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Vendredi, décembre 14, 2018

  1. Porn Sites Collect More User Data Than Netflix Or Hulu

    An anonymous reader quotes a report from Quartz: The biggest and perhaps best source of data about what people like to watch on the internet and what they would pay for doesn't come from streaming giants like Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, or Hulu. It comes from porn. While consuming porn is typically a private and personal affair, porn sites still track your every move: What content you choose, which moments you pause, which parts you repeat. By mining this data to a deeper degree than other streaming services, many porn sites are able to give internet users exactly what they want -- and they want a lot of it. [...] MindGeek is the world's biggest porn company -- more specifically, it's a holding company that owns numerous adult entertainment sites and production companies, including the Pornhub Network. Like other streaming giants, MindGeek's sites analyze user data, but the company has an edge when it comes to producing tailor-made content in-house. With at least 125 million daily visits, MindGeek has a massive range of users to draw data from and create content for. The average user can watch as much porn as they'd like without so much as making an account, let alone paying, but in exchange for meeting desires that can't always be met elsewhere, companies like MindGeek access user data because the user more willingly lets them. And it eventually pays off, when users decide to pay for premium content and the habits of paying subscribers become even clearer. What's more, Pornhub, in particular, operates one of the most sophisticated digital data analysis operations that caters primarily to users and not advertisers. Pornhub Insights provides transparency into its data collection -- on the most intimate of subjects -- by making research and analysis from billions of data points about viewership patterns, often tied to events from politics to pop culture, available to the public. It offers more than many other tech giants do.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 20:00:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  2. Apple iPhone X screen falls short of promises, lawsuit says

    Complaint argues false pixels, notch, and measurements don't fit with ad claims

    Two iPhone owners sued Apple on Friday claiming that company misrepresents the screen resolution and screen size of its recent model iPhones.…

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 19:45:43 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  3. VSCO will discontinue its desktop photo editing presets on March 1st

    VSCO is pretty well-known for its photo and video editing app, but the company has sold desktop presets as well. However, VSCO has now announced that it will shift its focus entirely towards mobile in the coming year and will, therefore, be discontin...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 19:37:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  4. 'Bomb threat' scammers linked to earlier sextortion campaign

    Scare tactic efforts may be the work of a single group

    Yesterday's 'bomb scare' spam campaign may have been a follow-up to another infamous email extortion effort.…

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 19:29:04 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  5. T-Mobile, Sprint Merger Will Reportedly Be Cleared By US National Security Panel

    According to CNBC, T-Mobile and Sprint are expecting their merger to be approved by a U.S. national security panel as early as next week, after their respective parent companies said they would consider dropping Huawei. From the report: U.S. government officials have been pressuring T-Mobile's German majority owner, Deutsche Telekom, to stop using Huawei equipment, the sources said, over concerns that Huawei is effectively controlled by the Chinese state and its network equipment may contain "back doors" that could enable cyber espionage, something which Huawei denies. That pressure is part of the national security review of T-Mobile's $26 billion deal to buy U.S. rival Sprint, the sources said. The Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS) has been conducting a national security review of the Sprint deal, which was announced in April. Negotiations between the two companies and the U.S. government have not been finalized and any deal could still fall through, the sources cautioned. Sprint's parent, SoftBank Group, plans to replace 4G network equipment from Huawei with hardware from Nokia and Ericsson, Nikkei reported on Thursday, without citing sources.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 19:20:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  6. Vitamin Water gets massive publicity for new flavor: Utter BS

    Says it will give people $100,000 to ditch their smartphone. It won't

    It's your lucky day: sugary soft drink maker Vitamin Water has said it will give you $100,000 if you are able to give up your smartphone for a year.…

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 19:12:03 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  7. Sony Released Its Playstation Classic Console In A Way That Makes It Eminently Hackable

    Gamers of a certain age will be very familiar with the insanity from roughly 2010 that was Sony's reaction to having its Playstation 3 console hacked to return functionality that Sony initially advertised and then rescinded via a firmware update. While PS3 owners cheered on the hack, as many of them loved the function that Sony took away, Sony instead began a full on legal war with the Geohot, the hobbyist who gave users what they wanted. The whole thing was a complete mess that made Sony look awful and ultimately resulted in the Playstation 4 of course not having the function that users wanted, and the console being much, much more locked down at release.

    I'm going to take a moment again to remind you that this all occurred only roughly 8 years ago. Why? Well, because Sony recently released its Playstation Classic retro console... and apparently made it very, very easy to hack.

    The PlayStation Classic was a great idea that was disappointingly executed. Not surprisingly, hackers have been hard at work trying to crack the novelty console as they’ve done already with Nintendo’s NES Classicand SNES Classic.

    The job’s been made easier, the hackers claim, thanks to Sony reportedly housing the key to decoding the PlayStation Classic’s firmware on the device itself, rather than utilizing a private key held by Sony. The underlying code that runs on game console is encrypted to prevent people from tampering with it, but in this case the tools to unlock and start changing how the console operates were available to anyone who dug through the code by copying it onto a PC. As first reported by Ars Technica, console hacker yifanlu pointed it out on Twitter late last week in-between streaming his attempts to break open the console’s digital architecture on Twitch. So far they’ve been able to play unincluded PS1 games like Spyro using a thumb drive and are currently working on getting other emulators working on it as well.

    Here again we see hackers enabling what gamers wanted out of their Playstation Classic devices, but which Sony failed to provide. The biggest disappointment in the Playstation Classic has been the short game library. By screwing around with the console, tinkerers can enable playing many, many more games. And, given that this is Sony we're talking about that just went through all of this with the PS3, you have to wonder just how much of this was done on purpose, and how much is Sony not having things buttoned up on their end.

    “There really isn’t any security on the device at all,” yifanlu told Kotaku in an email. “Sony managed to accidentally include their firmware update private keys on every console.”

    If that's true, you have to wonder if another round of stupid of the kind we saw with the PS3 is about to happen. Sony is notoriously protective of its hardware, often leading it down a litigious path. But if the company were to once again attack tinkerers and deprive users of useful features for its product, and did so after so willfully ignoring securing its consoles from this type of thing, that would nearly smack of a honeypot rather than Sony having any true gripe.



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    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 18:45:17 De: Techdirt Easily digestible tech news... Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  8. Apple Will Update iPhones In China To Avoid a Ban On Sales

    An anonymous reader quotes a report from The New York Times: Apple said it would update the software of iPhones in China (Warning: source paywalled; alternative source) to try to resolve a legal dispute that threatens to stop the company from selling older iPhones in the country. Apple and its longtime chip supplier, Qualcomm, have been fighting in court over Apple's use of Qualcomm's technology. On Nov. 30, a Chinese court ruled Apple must immediately stop selling seven older iPhone models in China because it infringed on two Qualcomm patents. But Apple has not stopped selling those iPhones there. The company has argued the phones are not subject to the ruling because they are running new software that was not discussed at trial. On Friday, Apple said in a statement that it would update its iPhones in China early next week "to address any possible concern about our compliance with the order." Apple said its update would change the iPhones' software so it did not infringe on Qualcomm patents, which relate to switching between apps and changing the size and appearance of photographs.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 18:40:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  9. Marci and Foggy Probably Would Have Gotten Married, 'Daredevil' Star Says

    Netflix’s decision to cancel Daredevil leaves fans with plenty of unanswered questions about where the show and its characters were headed next. We’ll probably never know the answer to most of those unresolved stories, but there’s one big question that we can now safely answer thanks to the help of one of the show’s stars: What happens to Marci and Foggy?

    In an interview, Amy Rutberg (Marci Stahl on the Netflix/Marvel universe) tells Inverse where the two characters would have ended up if Daredevil was allowed to continue into seasons 4 and 5.

    “From a personal level, I would have loved to see what would have happened with Marci and Foggy,” Rutberg says. “I would have liked to see them get married. There probably would have been some conflict before, but sadly none of those things happened.”

    Read More... Marci and Foggy Probably Would Have Gotten Married, 'Daredevil' Star Says

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 18:24:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  10. Scumbag hackers lift $1m from children's charity

    Utter asshats pull seven-figure heist on Save the Children Foundation

    A group of criminal asswipes have managed to steal $1m from the Save the Children Foundation.…

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 18:18:14 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  11. New York settles with Equifax and others over lax mobile app security

    New York Attorney General Barbara Underwood announced that the state has reached settlements with five companies regarding a security vulnerability present on each of their mobile apps. Going forward, the companies -- Equifax, Western Union, Pricelin...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 18:05:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  12. Nintendo Warns It Won't Make More Retro NES and SNES Consoles

    Nintendo's Reggie Fils-Aime warned that the NES Classic and SNES Classic will sell in the Americas through the holidays, but will be "gone" once they sell out. Engadget reports: If you want to walk down memory lane after that, you'll have to take advantage of the games that come with Switch Online. You might also want to tamp down your hopes for a Nintendo 64 Classic. Fils-Aime added that the existing systems are the "extent of our classic program." That wouldn't be completely surprising given that the N64 was considerably more complex than its predecessor. The executive likewise ruled out additional games for the mini NES and SNES models.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 17:58:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  13. Apple Music now streams on Echo speakers

    Apple Music support on Echo speakers is here earlier than expected. Users in the United States have been able to connect their Apple Music account in the Alexa app and play music through Amazon's line of smart speakers, according to 9to5Mac. The feat...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 17:33:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  14. The prefab Plugin House turns ruins into livable dwellings in just one day

    Beijing-based design studio People’s Architecture Office has proved yet again their knack for innovation and socially conscious design with their recent project the Shangwei Village Plugin House. Made with a modular building system of prefabricated panels, these customizable homes can slot into existing structures to make formerly uninhabitable spaces livable and attractive for far less than the cost of a typical renovation. The experimental dwellings were installed in the Chinese village of Shanghai...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 17:30:11 De: Inhabitat Green design & innovation for a better world Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  15. 'Chilling Adventures of Sabrina' Theory Explains Sabrina's Twin Plot Hole

    One of the weirdest throughlines that kept popping up in Chilling Adventures of Sabrina felt like a huge plot hole, but a somewhat gruesome theory could explain why the show is so obsessed with twins.

    Way back in the first episode of Chilling Adventures of Sabrina’s first season, Sabrina Spellman has a vision in which she sees herself as a baby, but lying next to her is another baby. It left all of us wondering where Sabrina’s evil twin is, especially because a similar plot played out in the Sabrina the Teenage Witch series featuring the same character.

    But there’s another, kinda gross explanation: Sabrina had an evil twin — but she absorbed it in the womb. Why else would this very specific phenomenon be mentioned twice in Season 1?

    Read More... 'Chilling Adventures of Sabrina' Theory Explains Sabrina's Twin Plot Hole

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 17:26:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  16. Watch the Tesla Gigafactory's Impressive Progress in Stunning Video Montage

    Tesla’s Gigafactory 1 isn’t even halfway finished and it’s already smashing records. Elon Musk’s electric vehicle company took to Twitter on Friday to flex that, though the battery factory in Clark, Nevada is only 30 percent constructed, it already produces the highest volume of lithium-ion batteries in the world.

    The company’s Twitter shared the above video along with a handful of stats to back up the impressive milestone. Gigafactory 1 is a pivotal part of manufacturing the Model 3, the Power Wall EV charger, and Power Pack energy storage unit. This is only made possible by the more than 7,000 employees that currently work at the subassembly factory. It has been under construction since 2015 and has employed more than 17,000 construction workers throughout those three years. Tesla expects the Gigafactory 1 to be fully built by sometime in 2020.

    Read More... Watch the Tesla Gigafactory's Impressive Progress in Stunning Video Montage

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 17:17:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  17. Discord Store To Offer Developers 90 Percent of Game Revenues

    DarkRookie2 shares a report from Ars Technica: Discord has announced that it will start taking a reduced, 10-percent cut from game revenues generated on its online store starting next year, one-upping the Epic Games Store and its recently announced 12-percent cut on the Epic Games Store. The move comes alongside a coming expansion of the Discord Games Store, which launched earlier this year with a tightly curated selection of games that now includes roughly 100 titles. The coming "self-serve publishing platform" will allow developers "no matter what size, from AAA to single-person teams" to access the Discord Store and the new 90-percent revenue share. "We talked to a lot of developers, and many of them feel that current stores are not earning their 30% of the usual 70/30 revenue share," Discord writes in the announcement. "Because of this, we now see developers creating their own stores and launchers to distribute their games instead of focusing on what's really important --making great games and cultivating amazing communities." "Turns out, it does not cost 30% to distribute games in 2018," the announcement continues. "After doing some research, we discovered that we can build amazing developer tools, run them, and give developers the majority of the revenue share."

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 17:15:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  18. 'The Grand Tour' confirmed for Season 4 and 'years to come'

    By Zac Palmer The boys are back on Amazon, but with a different show format.The Grand Tour is set to be on Prime Video for years to come, but it will be different, with Jeremy, Richard and James exclusively working on road trip specials. That means...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 17:01:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  19. An AI system has just created the most realistic looking photos ever

    Computers are getting better at generating pictures of humans. This will go down well.

    AI systems can now create images of humans that are so lifelike they look like photographs, except the people in them don’t really exist.…

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 16:59:08 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  20. FCC Does Wireless Carriers Another Favor By Reclassifying Text Messages

    The FCC this week voted yes on a new proposal the agency says will help combat the scourge of robocalls, but critics and consumer groups say opens the door to wireless carriers being able to censor text message campaigns they don't like, or SMS services that may compete with their own offerings.

    In a 3-1 party line vote, the FCC approved (pdf) redefining text messages as an "information service," therefore freeing such services from FCC oversight. In its announcement, the agency was quick to insist that this was done specifically to help carriers better fight robocalls and robotexts without worrying about running afoul of government rules:

    "In today’s ruling, the FCC denies requests from mass-texting companies and other parties to classify text messaging services as “telecommunications services” subject to common carrier regulation under the Communications Act—a classification that would limit wireless providers’ efforts to combat spam and scam robotexts effectively. Instead, the FCC finds that two forms of wireless messaging services, SMS and Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS), are "information services" under the Communications Act. With this decision, the FCC empowers wireless providers to continue taking action to protect American consumers from unwanted text messages.

    Critics, however, charge that this was another example of the FCC's motives not being made entirely clear to the public at large.

    As we've noted previously, this particular debate over text message classification began some time back, after Verizon decided to ban a pro-choice group named NARAL Pro-Choice America from sending text messages to Verizon Wireless customers that had opted in to receiving them. Ever since then, consumer groups, worried that cellular carriers would use their power as gatekeepers to stifle certain voices, have been urging the FCC to declare text messages a “telecommunications service," making it illegal for carriers to ban such select SMS services.

    This being the Ajit Pai FCC, the agency went the complete opposite direction in a move that largely benefits wireless carriers. The fight somewhat mirrors the net neutrality battle involving whether to classify ISPs themselves as "information services" under the telecom act (freeing them from significant oversight), or "telecommunications services"--keeping them locked into oversight by the FCC. Consumer groups like Public Knowledge were quick to issue statements pointing out this had everything to do with ensuring telecom giants are less accountable, and little to nothing to do with actually combating robocalls and robotexts:

    "No one should mistake today’s action as an effort to help consumers limit spam and robotexts. There is a reason why carriers are applauding while more than 20 consumer protection advocates -- along with 10 Senators -- have cried foul. This decision does nothing to curb spam, and is not needed to curb spam. It is simply the latest example of Chairman Pai’s radical agenda that puts companies ahead of consumers. We urge members of Congress to overturn this decision and ensure that wireless carriers cannot block or censor personal text messages."

    Those concerns were mirrored by FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel in her lone dissent:

    Today the @FCC makes the same mess for text messages it did for #NetNeutrality last year.

    That means your carrier now has the legal right to block your text messages and censor the very content of your messages themselves.

    I dissent.

    — Jessica Rosenworcel (@JRosenworcel) December 12, 2018

    Like net neutrality, gutting oversight of companies with decades of anti-competitive behavior under their belts (not to mention flimsy and dwindling organic free market pressure to behave) generally doesn't work out very well for end users or those looking to compete with these entrenched network operators. It's worth noting the ruling doesn't apply to the next-generation texting standard, RCS, though carriers like Verizon have already called for that to occur in future orders; something Ajit Pai is likely to approve as well.



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    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 16:30:42 De: Techdirt Easily digestible tech news... Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  21. PyText builds on PyTorch for language recognition

    Facebook has open-sourced its PyText project, a machine learning library for natural language processing (NLP) intended to make it easier to put together both experimental projects and production systems.

    PyText, built with Facebook’s existing PyTorch library for machine learning and used internally by the company, was created to address how machine learning using neural networks (such as for NLP). Such libraries typically were “a trade-off between frameworks optimized for experimentation and those optimized for production,” they said in a post.

    To read this article in full, please click here

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 16:30:00 De: Infoworld All Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  22. PyText builds on PyTorch for language recognition

    Facebook has open-sourced its PyText project, a machine learning library for natural language processing (NLP) intended to make it easier to put together both experimental projects and production systems.

    PyText, built with Facebook’s existing PyTorch library for machine learning and used internally by the company, was created to address how machine learning using neural networks (such as for NLP). Such libraries typically were “a trade-off between frameworks optimized for experimentation and those optimized for production,” they said in a post.

    To read this article in full, please click here

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 16:30:00 De: Infoworld News Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  23. One year on after US repealed net neutrality, policymakers reflect soberly on the future

    Don't be daft, of course they haven't, we're still in Crazytown USA

    Analysis One year ago today, the FCC passed a controversial measure that undermined its own rules, passed just two years earlier, over net neutrality.…

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 16:29:50 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  24. Nintendo warns it won't make more retro NES and SNES consoles

    Just because Nintendo revived the NES Classic doesn't mean you'll have the luxury of buying a retro console whenever you'd like. In a chat with the Hollywood Reporter, the company's Reggie Fils-Aime warned that the NES Classic and SNES Classic will...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 16:29:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  25. What Are Silicon Valley's Highest-Paying Tech Jobs?

    An anonymous reader writes: Job-search site Indeed crunched its Silicon Valley hiring numbers for 2018, looking at tech job searches, salaries, and employers, and found that engineers who combine tech skills with business skills as directors of product management earn the most, with an average salary of US $186,766. Last year, the gig came in as number two, at $173,556. Also climbing up the ranks, and now in the number two spot with an average annual salary of $181,100, is senior reliability engineer. Application security engineer is third at $173,903. Neither made the top 20 in 2017. And while it seems that machine learning engineers have been getting all the love in 2018, those jobs came in eighth place, at $159,230. That's still a bit of a leap from last year, when the job made its first appearance on Indeed's top 20 highest-paying jobs in the 13th spot at $149,519. This year's top 20 is below; last year's numbers are here. Further reading: 'Blockchain Developer' is the Fastest-Growing US Job (LinkedIn study).

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 16:28:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  26. Tumblr Is Making It Harder to Find Porn by Censoring Search Results

    The official date that Tumblr will start removing adult content was announced this month as Monday, December 17, but the steps toward the purge had already started on Friday, with Tumblr appearing to censor search results for people looking to find adult content on the site that’s become a home for artists and adult content creators.

    A search for porn on the site now yields zero results. On Thursday, a stream of GIFs and photos still appeared in the results. Meanwhile, a search for nude only yields images of paintings and sculptures, whereas, pictures of people and more explicit drawings populated the search results on Thursday. The Tumblr app has also returned to the Apple app store, Gizmodo reported Thursday evening.

    Read More... Tumblr Is Making It Harder to Find Porn by Censoring Search Results

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 16:03:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  27. Apple's streaming service will include new 'Peanuts' cartoons

    Apple's plans for streaming animated shows won't be limited to completely new properties. The tech firm has struck a deal with DHX Media to produce original shows (including shorts and specials) based on Charles Schultz's classic Peanuts comics and...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 16:02:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  28. Teens Started Snorting Condoms and Doctors Got Mad

    Whenever teens hop on some new fad, parents flip out. Without fail. That’s what happened when teens started the Condom Challenge — snorting condoms up the nostril and out the throat for viral fame — earlier this year. We at Inverse prefer not to play the role of parent or cop, but this trend was one that begged for a healthy Well, actually. So, we asked a doctor to tell us why it was so terrible.

    “Condom snorting is definitely not a good idea,” Dr. Jennifer Villwock, a University of Kansas Medical Center assistant professor of otolaryngology, told Inverse in April, when the trend peaked. “Do not recommend!”

    Read More... Teens Started Snorting Condoms and Doctors Got Mad

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 15:56:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  29. Stop us if you've heard this one: Facebook apologizes for bug leaking private photos

    Data gathering biz still having trouble keeping data secure

    Facebook on Friday apologized for a bug that may have exposed exposed private photos to third-party apps for the 12 day period from September 13 to September 25, 2018.…

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 15:51:01 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  30. Regular Windows 10 Users Who Manually Look For Updates May End Up Downloading Beta Code, Microsoft Says

    In addition to relying on Windows Insiders, employees, and willing participants for testing updates, Microsoft is pushing patches before they are known to be stable to regular users too if they opt to click the "check for updates" button on their own, the company said. From a report: In a blog post by Michael Fortin, Corporate Vice President for Windows, it is made clear that home users are intentionally being given updates that are not necessarily ready for deployment. Many power users are familiar with Patch Tuesday. On the second Tuesday of each month, Microsoft pushes out a batch of updates at 10:00 a.m. Pacific time on this day containing security fixes, bug patches, and other non-security fixes. Updates pushed out as part of Patch Tuesday are known as "B" release since it happens during the second week of the month. During the third and fourth weeks of the month are where things begin to get murky. Microsoft's "C" and "D" releases are considered previews for commercial customers and power users. No security fixes are a part of these updates, but for good reasoning. Microsoft has come out to directly say that some users are the guinea pigs for everyone else. In some fairness to Microsoft, C and D updates are typically only applied when a user manually checks for updates by clicking the button buried within Settings. However, if end users really wanted to be a part of testing the latest features, the Windows Insider Program is designed exactly for that purpose. Further reading: Windows 10's 'Check for updates' button may download beta code.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 15:49:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  31. Sony has a PS4 Pro bundle for 'Kingdom Hearts III' fans

    If you're a Kingdom Hearts super fan, you know the third installment of the franchise is just around the corner. Don't worry if you're currently without a console to play it on, Sony has you covered. On January 29, the worldwide release date for the...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 15:31:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  32. Climate change is killing reindeer in the Arctic

    A new Arctic Report Card from the US National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has revealed that the wild reindeer - or caribou - population has plummeted by more than half during the last two decades. According to the report, the impact of climate change in the Arctic has resulted in the reindeer population falling from 5 million to 2.1 million. The report found that the weather patterns and vegetation changes in the Arctic tundra have had a major negative impact on the reindeer,...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 15:30:00 De: Inhabitat Green design & innovation for a better world Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  33. Tender Monkey Video Shows That Humans Aren't Alone in Loving ASMR

    A monkey has more in common with a college kid watching ASMR videos than you’d think. As a new study shows, monkeys called Barbary macaques become more chilled out after watching another individual getting groomed, much like ASMR fans who have just experienced Cardi B’s iconic ASMR video. More than just point out a nice similarity between us and our primate relatives, this observation suggests that intimate ASMR experiences might even make both us and macaques nicer.

    Devotees of autonomous sensory meridian response videos — characterized by soft, repetitive, and mundane sounds and movements that in some people elicit a highly sought-after scalp frisson — claim that watching the videos makes them feel relaxed and sometimes even a bit tingly. In many of these videos, ASMRtists simulate grooming the viewer in order to elicit that response.

    Read More... Tender Monkey Video Shows That Humans Aren't Alone in Loving ASMR

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 15:08:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  34. Inspector General: FBI Lost Six Months Of Important Text Messages Because Its Retention System Sucks

    It's great to know the FBI wants encryption broken so it can forensically molest any devices in its possession to find the mother lode of culpatory evidence these devices always contain. ("Always," you ask? The FBI irritatedly taps the word "always" repeatedly in response.)

    The reason this is such good news is that the FBI can't even manage to reliably extract content from phones it issues to agents and other personnel. If you can't expertly handle data migration/storage from phones in your control at all times, how badly are you going to bungle forensic evidence extraction at scale if the government ever green lights encryption backdoors?

    The DOJ Inspector General has just released a report [PDF] detailing its investigation of missing text messages sent by two agents at the center of a Congressional hearing about supposed biased behavior during the FBI investigation of Hillary Clinton and Mueller's investigation of Donald Trump. Agents Peter Strzok and Lisa Page exchanged text messages expressing their dislike of Trump and made some comments suggesting they would do something to harm his presidential chances. Critics believed this showed these agents -- if not the agency itself -- were guided by political bias when investigating Trump's ties with Russia.

    Maybe there was more to this than there first appeared to be. Thousands of text messages from the agents' devices went missing -- a gap that stretched from December 2016 to May 2017. The Inspector General's office used forensic tools to recover roughly 19,000 text messages from the two phones. The culprit appears to be standard operating procedure rather than a deliberate attempt to destroy evidence.

    Strzok and Page had each returned their DOJ-issued iPhones six months earlier when their assignments to the SCO (Special Counsel's Office) had ended. The OIG was told that the DOJ issued iPhone previously assigned to Strzok had been re-issued to another FBI agent… CYBER obtained a forensic extraction of the iPhone previously assigned to Strzok; however, this iPhone had been reset to factory settings and was reconfigured for the new user...

    The same thing happened to Page's phone. It was reset in July 2017 by personnel at the DOJ's Justice Management Decision. It hadn't been issued to another agent but it had been restored in preparation for reassignment.

    Resetting phones just makes sense. Nothing about the FBI's handling of records its supposed to be retaining does. Text messages are official communications. They're subject to public records requests and they're often responsive to subpoenas in criminal cases. Wiping a phone without ensuring existing communications have been backed up is monumentally stupid and possibly illegal.

    To the agency's credit, it does try to retain these communications before resetting issued devices. The problem is its tool works poorly. As does its management:

    FBI Assistant General Counsel [redacted for some fucking reason] informed OIG that there does not appear to be a directive for preservation of texts by ESOC [Enterprise Security Operations Center], but that ESOC retains text messages as a matter of practice.

    Define "retain" and "matter of practice" in the context of a six-month gap of non-retention of Strzok/Page text messages. I guess it's the thought that counts?

    [E]SOC could not provide a specific explanation for the failure in the FBI's text message collection relating to Strzok's and Page's S5 phones…

    ESOC did offer up a set of possible explanations for the failure, none of which are reassuring. First, it could have been a bug reported by the vendor in 2016 but not fixed until March 2017. The application itself could have been misconfigured. The application may not have been compatible with device software updates.

    Efforts were made to mitigate the issue. But those failed as well. The FBI phased out Samsung S5s and replaced them with S7s. Nothing changed but the phone model.

    [A]ccording to FBI's Information and Technology Branch, as of November 15, 2018, the data collection tool utilized by FBI was still not reliably collecting text messages from approximately 10 percent of FBI issued mobile devices…

    That the OIG was able to recover thousands of messages from forensic extraction and scouring the FBI's enterprise database isn't really good news. It's unlikely the FBI will make the same effort when hit with discovery demands and it already won't thoroughly search databases it has full access to when responding to FOIA requests. So, records are going to go missing and it won't be until the OIG steps in that any effort will be made to find the missing records, much less take a good look at the broken processes that caused them to go missing in the first place.



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    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 15:01:16 De: Techdirt Easily digestible tech news... Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:03
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  35. Boeing 737 Passenger Jet Damaged in Possible Midair Drone Hit

    Grupo Aeromexico SAB is investigating whether a drone slammed into a Boeing Co. 737 jetliner as the aircraft approached its destination in Tijuana, Mexico, on the U.S. border. From a report: Images on local media showed considerable damage to the nose of the 737-800, which was operating Wednesday as Flight 773 from Guadalajara. In a cabin recording, crew members can be heard saying they heard a "pretty loud bang" and asking the control tower to check if the nose was damaged. The collision happened shortly before landing. "The exact cause is still being investigated," Aeromexico said in a statement. "The aircraft landed normally and the passengers' safety was never compromised." The potential drone strike stoked fears that the rising use of uncrewed aircraft will endanger planes filled with passengers. While most nations prohibit drones from flying in pathways reserved for airliners, the millions of small consumer devices that have been purchased around the world can't be tracked on radar, making it difficult for authorities to enforce the rules. In addition, many users don't know the rules or don't follow them.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 15:01:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  36. Fed up with Oracle's Sith, AWS wades into Big Red's lawsuit over Pentagon JEDI contract

    Long-standing cloud enemies to do battle in the courts

    AWS has intervened in Oracle's lawsuit against the Pentagon's plans to award a $10bn cloud contract to a single vendor.…

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 15:00:05 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  37. Maria Butina: Cybersecurity charlatan, spy

    Russian spy Maria Butina's cover story was her academic interest and expertise in cybersecurity. As cover stories go, this unfortunately wasn't a hard one to pull off. Except anyone holding even the barest minimum of cybersecurity knowledge could've...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 15:00:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
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  38. 4 Things You Can Only Learn After Using Bose's Sleep Buds for a Week

    A friend once told me, “I’ve never achieved REM sleep during my time living in Manhattan.” Even I, a person who once slept through the blaring of their home alarm system have trouble falling asleep.

    My surroundings may be in part to blame. A major commuter line, the Long Island Railroad, passes behind my building every hour, and my delightful neighbors seem to be fans of the mid-week rager. My roommates also enjoy playing video games in the living room until the wee hours of the night. So to combat all this ruckus-induced restlessness, I conscripted the help of the futuristic Bose Noise-Masking Sleepbuds.

    Read More... 4 Things You Can Only Learn After Using Bose's Sleep Buds for a Week

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 15:00:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
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  39. Ebola outbreak reaches city of 1 million residents

    Enlarge / Ebola treatment center at the Hospital in Beni, North Kivu Province. (credit: MONUSCO/Alain Coulibaly)

    The Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo has spread to a city of nearly 1 million residents. There are now 30 confirmed cases and 15 deaths in the city of Butembo reported in the latest update provided by the World Health Organization (WHO). The number of cases in the city center is still low, according to Doctors Without Borders, but that number is rising quickly in more outlying districts and suburbs.

    The outbreak, which has been going on since August, has so far resulted in 467 confirmed cases and a further 48 probable cases. More than half of the cases have resulted in death (including those of 17 health workers), while 177 patients have recovered, including a newborn baby.

    Limited containment

    The rate of transmission is beginning to slow down in Beni, a smaller city approximately 36 miles north of Butembo that has the highest number of reported cases so far. But “the outbreak is intensifying in Butembo and Katwa,” writes the WHO, “and new clusters are emerging elsewhere.”

    Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 14:43:29 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
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  40. Hyundai finally gives us a price for the 2019 Kona EV—$29,995

    Enlarge / The Kona EV is relaxing to drive but does not demand you take it by the scruff and carve some canyons. (credit: Hyundai)

    In October, we finally got a chance to drive the Hyundai Kona EV, a rather wonderful little electric vehicle. Based on the internal combustion-powered Kona, it packs in 64kWh of lithium-ion to give it an EPA range of 258 miles (415km). On top of that, the little Kona EV also sported a rather nifty Smart Regeneration System that uses the car's cruise control radar to maximize energy recuperation when following other cars. The one thing we couldn't tell you back then was how much this EV would cost.

    Wonder no more. On Friday, Hyundai finally revealed US pricing: the 2019 Kona EV will start at $36,450, which means it should cost $28,950 after the $7,500 IRS tax credit is taken into account. (On top of that, there's the delivery charge, which bumps the post-credit price up to $29,995.)

    That makes it more expensive than the base model Nissan Leaf, which starts at $29,990 before tax credits. However, the Leaf only offers 150 miles (241km) of range, and you'd need to spring for the $36,200 Leaf SL to get a similar level of equipment to the Hyundai. (A longer-range, more expensive Leaf with a 60kWh battery pack is coming at some point in 2019, but that adds $5,500 to the car's price.)

    Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 14:35:46 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  41. 8,000 barrels of oil spill in the Peruvian Amazon

    Approximately 8,000 barrels of crude oil have spilled into the Amazon, and the Peru State oil company Petroperu says its because some local indigenous people severed the pipeline. According to a company statement, members of the Mayuriaga community in the Loreto region first damaged the pipeline and then interfered with the technicians trying to repair it. “The townspeople prevented us from securing the pipe to stop petroleum from spilling from the pipe,” said Beatriz Alva Hart, a Petroperu...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 14:30:21 De: Inhabitat Green design & innovation for a better world Dernière modification:
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  42. Epic removes 'overpowered' Infinity Blade from 'Fortnite'

    Fortnite fans got a taste of the game's mythic items this week with the Infinity Blade (as in Epic's games of the same name). Only one such sword was available in a match, and the player who wielded it received a health and shield boost, HP regenerat...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 14:28:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  43. Hilarious Aviation Gin Ad Proves Ryan Reynolds Never Stops Playing Deadpool

    The line between reality and fiction has never been more blurred than in the latest video advertisement for Aviation Gin, the spirits company owned by Deadpool star Ryan Reynolds since February. Reynolds wears his own handsome mug rather Deadpool’s pizza face for the ad, but the tone of the whole thing reminds us so much of the Merc With a Mouth.

    Maybe this was always Reynold’s comedic style? Or maybe Deadpool directed this ad? We really can’t tell, but the timing is perfect with Once Upon a Deadpool — the PG-13 holiday cut of Deadpool 2 — just out in theaters.

    Reynolds himself shared the ad over social media on Thursday. Titled “The Process | Aviation Gin,” the visual storytelling structure riffs on stereotypical highbrow ads for comparable spirits, telling the step-by-step holistic process through which the gin is made.

    Read More... Hilarious Aviation Gin Ad Proves Ryan Reynolds Never Stops Playing Deadpool

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 14:28:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
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  44. In Booming Job Market, Workers Are 'Ghosting' Their Employers

    A notorious millennial dating practice is starting to creep into the workplace: ghosting. Employers are noticing with increasing frequency that workers are leaving their jobs by simply not showing up and cutting off contact with their companies [Editor's note: the link may be paywalled; syndicated source]. From a report: "A number of contacts said that they had been 'ghosted,' a situation in which a worker stops coming to work without notice and then is impossible to contact," the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago noted in December's Beige Book, which tracks employment trends. National data on economic "ghosting" is lacking. The term, which usually applies to dating, first surfaced in 2016 on Dictionary.com. But companies across the country say silent exits are on the rise. Analysts blame America's increasingly tight labor market. Job openings have surpassed the number of seekers for eight straight months, and the unemployment rate has clung to a 49-year low of 3.7 percent since September. Janitors, baristas, welders, accountants, engineers -- they're all in demand, said Michael Hicks, a labor economist at Ball State University in Indiana. More people may opt to skip tough conversations and slide right into the next thing.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 14:19:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  45. From 'Smurfenstein' to 'Fortnite': A Definitive History of Video Game Mods

    This week, Epic Games released Fortnite: Creative, a new mode for the video game phenomenon that gives players access to their own island where they can easily manipulate objects, build their own environments, and invite friends for private games. Players are already using it to build everything from wacky race tracks to perfect recreations of iconic video game levels.

    In the world of Fortnite, this might feel revolutionary, but it’s just the latest step in a long history of video games fans taking the things they love and turning them into something new. In the gaming world it’s called “modding,” and it’s come a long way in terms of accessibility and popularity over the past 37 years.

    Read More... From 'Smurfenstein' to 'Fortnite': A Definitive History of Video Game Mods

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 14:18:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
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  46. Formula E starts season 5 in Saudi Arabia with a faster electric race car

    Formula E

    Most of the motorsports world takes a well-deserved break in December. The long Formula 1 championship is done, as is the even longer NASCAR season. But this weekend, one series is about to get started: it's time for Formula E, which holds its first race of the 2018/2019 championship on Saturday. This is the fifth season for this electric racing championship, and it represents a new chapter for the sport as Formula E gets all-new cars and adds some new cities to the roster (including this weekend's race, which takes place in Ad Diriyah, Saudi Arabia).

    Here at Ars, we've been fans of the all-electric racing series from day one. We were at the first-ever US race in Miami in 2015, and that same year two of the cars even carried our logo at the season finale in London. Since then, we've been regulars at the NYC ePrix, a two-day doubleheader that marks the conclusion of the championship. Electric cars racing on temporary street circuits in city centers represented quite a departure from your average racing series, and it's fair to say that Formula E has had to deal with a lot of skeptics. But we like people who try new things, and, over the course of the past four years, the sport has done a lot to win many naysayers over.

    Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 14:10:19 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
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  47. New research may upend what we know about how tornadoes form

    New data on the birth of tornadoes suggest that the twisters don’t form from the top down.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 14:06:29 De: Science News Daily news, blogs and biweekly magazine articles from Science News. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 18:27
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  48. Hot on heels of 2.0, Vivaldi 2.2 adds tab session management among other goodies

    But built-in email and mobile clients still works in progress

    Only months after reaching the 2.0 milestone, the independent Chromium-based browser Vivaldi has added a bunch of useful features.…

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 14:00:12 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  49. Gift cards and subscriptions to give as last-minute gifts

    Sometimes it's better to pick out a gift for someone yourself and other times it's a good idea to let that picky loved one choose their own. (And if you've waited this long to buy gifts, that might be your easiest course of action.) This is where gif...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 14:00:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  50. I Asked Some Furries Whether the New 'Sonic the Hedgehog' Is Hot or Not

    2018 is going down as the horniest year on record. Everyone has been extremely, embarrassingly horny on main, from collectively popping a chubby for a pretty duck, to that New Yorker columnist who openly lusted after the mom from the Incredibles (yes, that happened this year!) to our obsession with the sexiest punk politician of a generation. While the powers-that-be tried to punish sexual speech on just about every online platform possible, the rest of us just got freakier and more creative in response. Not even No Nut November could slow us from pursuing a singular goal: Getting sweaty palms over otherwise benign, non-sexual things.

    Which brings us to the latest salacious meme to enter the internet’s bonersphere: a new character design for the upcoming semi-live-action Sonic the Hedgehog movie. Ever since the release of a teaser by the film’s studio, Paramount Pictures, we’ve been forced to reckon with the question: It only takes a quick Google image search to be reminded of the fact that Sonic has been an online sex symbol for years, but a new, major motion picture could introduce the blue hedgehog to an entire new generation. Is this new Sonic design from the movie fuckable? I asked some furries to find out.

    “Oh it's fucking ugly as hell.”

    In a moving teaser poster released last week, we get our first look at the new Sonic. He darts around collecting rings before skidding to a stop in front of the viewer, poised on muscular, hairy legs.

    For a very short clip, there’s quite a bit to unpack here. In the cartoons, you never really see hair on him. His body is smooth and his legs, skinny. Like the fibers in Crash Bandicoot’s rebooted jeans, this new Sonic’s high-def follicles are jarring. “It would be weird and it would feel like he was running around nude if he was some sort of otter-like thing,” the film’s executive producer Tim Miller told IGN, in an effort to explain why the fuck this Sonic is so hairy. “It was always, for us, fur, and we never considered anything different. It’s part of what integrates him into the real world and makes him a real creature.”

    A second poster, allegedly leaked from a movie theater and posted to Twitter (although still unconfirmed by Paramount as being official Sonic paraphernalia), gives a more detailed look at those ripped legs—plus some kind of... electrical.... speedtrail... emanating from between them?

    If we look at the works of art and erotica produced by the Sonic fandom as a whole, there’s no denying that he’s been an object of desire for a long time—and the character as a childhood figure plays into that. When Motherboard showed Mandy Jones, a licensed social worker, a bunch of NSFW Sonic fanart, she had a very accepting response to it. “The visualization of sexuality can be a somewhat 'healthy' outlet for [young people] to express their questions and curiosity about sex and sexuality,” Jones said.

    This version, however has struck a chord of disgust for fans. Is it the hair that makes this Sonic disturbingly sexual instead of sexy-sexual? Is it the musculature under that fur? What are these virile vibes? I asked the real experts in anthropomorphized sexuality—the furry fandom—to help me untangle whether this version of Sonic is hot or not.

    Read more: My Life as Sexy Sonic

    “No. Eww. He's creepy!” one member of the furry community who asked to remain anonymous told me. “They should've hired one of us design him. We would've done a better job anyway."

    “Oh it's fucking ugly as hell,” Amethyst Basilisk, whose fursona is a cyberpunk dragon, told me in a Twitter message. “We're making fun of it because there's an immense amount of extremely talented artists that already make Sonic incredibly boneable. Notable furry artists have been drawing incredibly arousing Sonic porn for decades—Tails, for example, is stereotypically a bottom when being represented in gay versions of this porn.”

    These furries are absolutely correct. Paramount definitely should have hired a furry to do this design, and help them avoid this unfortunate creature that’s stuck in this strange anthropomorphic pubescent state. Unlike Mandarin ducks or Beto O’Rourke, Sonic is not new to the internet’s full depravity, and we have the anthro fandom to thank for a rich history of fuckable Sonic and friends. People have been wanting to nail that hedgehog—or, more frequently, imagine him and his pals fucking each other—since the beginning of this fandom. The scads of DeviantArt entries alone prove this, and I don’t need to tell you there’s plenty of Sonic the Hedgehog hardcore porn available elsewhere on tube sites and Reddit.

    Basilisk helped me break it down from “ew” to specifics in character design, from a furry point of view. “So he's got an anthro humanoid body. To furries, with that, you've got our interest already,” she said. “However, there seems to be confusion in the actual design of Sonic as to which direction they want to go in: realistic or cartoony. In artwork it's really, really difficult to actually accomplish both styles of proportions at the same time. And that's primarily where Sonic is failing miserably at being an icon of eros to furries—his proportions don't know which direction to go in.”

    Read more: Hedgehog Healing: We Asked a Social Worker About Amateur Sonic Erotica

    If the new Sonic design could pick an artistic direction, Basilisk told me, it would be a more interesting—and perhaps less disturbing—interpretation of the speedy hedgehog we love. “Give Sonic a proportional head and a six-pack and I guarantee people would be swooning,” she said. “Or, you could make him cell-shaded or something like that and go more in the direction of cartoon styles, and even then, you'd have people inspired to make erotic versions, 'cause hey, we love sexy cartoons. Ultimately, though, the design decision to do the ‘why not both?’ approach just utterly fails to make something appealing to anyone, frankly.”

    Having viewed quite a lot of deeply depraved fan art at this point, I tend to agree with this analysis. I’ve seen bulky Sonics with bodies shaped like a ribbed protein shake, and I’ve seen skinny softboi Sonics, and none of these is more gross than what Miller and his design team has made here. Even this Microsoft Paint Sonic is acceptable, because it commits to a style and sticks with it:

    The new Sonic the Hedgehog movies is set to be released in November 2019, giving us a whole year to consider what a CGI Sonic might look like alongside humans. That’s also plenty of time to think on how the most chaotically horny character ever, Eggman, might be portrayed. Perhaps the biggest crime in all of this is that the true hottie of the Sonic universe is being ignored.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 13:56:24 De: Motherboard RSS feed for https://motherboard.vice.com Dernière modification:
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  51. Scientists Discover Upside-Down Lakes and Waterfalls At the Bottom of the Ocean

    A weird wonderland of new ocean life has been discovered in the depths of the Gulf of California.

    The otherworldly ecosystem was recently explored by scientists from the US and Mexico. Their expedition focused on a previously uncharted hydrothermal vent field—an area on the seafloor where volcanism has heated the water—in the Pescadero Basin near the Baja Peninsula.

    Here, the team found holes in the seafloor “gushing high temperature fluids,” and steaming sediments “laden with orange-colored oil and the rotten-egg stink of sulfide. The researchers also captured footage of strange upside-down lakes and waterfalls, formed as superhot fluids poured out of a vent and pooled beneath the lip of an underwater cavern.

    Oasisia and Riftia tube worms are common throughout the vent field. Image: Schmidt Ocean Institute

    The more than 500 degree Fahrenheit waters around the hydrothermal vents were teeming with other species, too—tubeworms, anemones, and blue scale worms.

    Thermophilic, or heat-loving, organisms are fascinating to scientists as they test the extreme limits of life on Earth. Also known as extremophiles, some deep sea creatures and their unique existences can provide an analog for possible life on other planets as well. Those which metabolize methane, for example, are key to the hunt for life on Mars and Enceladus where methane has been detected.

    The Pescadero Basin was first discovered in 2015 by a Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institution expedition. This current expedition was led aboard the Schmidt Ocean Institute vessel Falkor.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 13:54:16 De: Motherboard RSS feed for https://motherboard.vice.com Dernière modification:
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  52. Booze Study Shatters the Myth of Healthy Moderate Drinking

    According to the government-issued 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, “moderate drinking” means two drinks a day for men and one drink a day for women. But University of Washington global health professor Emmanuela Gakidou, Ph.D., says this standard for healthy drinking is baloney. One or two drinks a day aren’t healthy, Gakidou told Inverse in August, and she’s co-authored a study that “shatters” that myth.

    Gakidou’s conclusion, published in The Lancet, is one of the most surprising things we learned about human health this year predominantly because of the longstanding idea that drinking alcohol can sometimes be a healthy act. Previous reports claimed that “moderate” drinking was good for the heart and circulatory system, and a number of studies have demonstrated very limited drinking can be beneficial to the body. But the science is shifting — and things don’t look great for lushes.

    Read More... Booze Study Shatters the Myth of Healthy Moderate Drinking

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 13:45:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
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  53. Encrypted Messaging App Signal Says It Won’t Comply With Australia’s New Backdoor Bill

    Last week, Australia’s parliament passed a new law that theoretically allows the country’s government to compel tech companies to assist law enforcement agencies by modifying software, should that be needed for officials to retrieve whatever information it is they want.

    This so-called “technical capability notice” is the most controversial part of the law, which critics fear will allow the Australian government to essentially mandate backdoors to encryption software like secure messaging apps, or mobile devices like the iPhone.

    Open Whisper Systems, the organization that makes the popular Signal encrypted messaging app, has now come out with a strong statement against the law: “We can’t include a backdoor in Signal,” developer Joshua Lund wrote in a blog post published on Signal’s official site on Thursday.

    “By design, Signal does not have a record of your contacts, social graph, conversation list, location, user avatar, user profile name, group memberships, group titles, or group avatars,” Lund added. “The end-to-end encrypted contents of every message and voice/video call are protected by keys that are entirely inaccessible to us. In most cases now we don’t even have access to who is messaging whom.”

    Got a tip? You can contact this reporter securely on Signal at +1 917 257 1382, OTR chat at lorenzofb@jabber.ccc.de, or email lorenzo@motherboard.tv

    As we wrote in the Motherboard Guide to Not Getting Hacked, Signal is one of our favorite messaging apps for security and privacy. Millions of people around the world use the app. And the company’s statement is a well-argued reaction to the law that sends a clear message: Signal would rather have the app banned than comply with an overreaching order.

    “Although we can’t include a backdoor in Signal, the Australian government could attempt to block the service or restrict access to the app itself. Historically, this strategy hasn’t worked very well. Whenever services get blocked, users quickly adopt VPNs or other network obfuscation techniques to route around the restrictions,” Lund’s post concluded. “This doesn’t seem like smart politics, but nothing about this bill seems particularly smart,”

    Signal isn’t alone there either. Apple, Google, Microsoft, and other tech giants have already sent a strong-worded letter condemning the bill.

    And it’s not just rhetoric. What Signal is saying here is that it can’t, at a technical level, comply with orders to turn over the encrypted content of messages sent over the app. And according to critics, therein lies the danger of Australia’s bill, which has yet to become law. Will it allow the country-continent, home to nearly 25 million people, to compel Apple to create a one-off version of its operating system to get into, say, a terrorist’s phone?

    At this point, no one knows for sure. But privacy-minded companies and organizations are already fearing, and speaking against, this worst case scenario.

    Listen to CYBER, Motherboard’s new weekly podcast about hacking and cybersecurity.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 13:43:55 De: Motherboard RSS feed for https://motherboard.vice.com Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  54. Ex-Sheriff Joe Arpaio Claims Three Publications Did $300 Million In Damage To His Pristine Reputation

    Former sheriff (and ongoing blight on the state of Arizona) Joe Arpaio has decided to sue a handful of new agencies for defamation. The slightly-overwrought press release from FreedomWatch (and founder Larry Klayman) alleges defamation per se on the part of CNN, the Huffington Post, and Rolling Stone and claims these three publications caused $300.5 million in damage to Arpaio's otherwise impeccable reputation.

    Here's Freedom Watch's zesty summation of the lawsuit:

    "It's time that someone stood up to the Left's 'Fake News' media, which is bent on destroying anyone who is a supporter of the president and in particular Sheriff Arpaio. My client will not be bullied by the likes of Jeff Zucker, Chris Cuomo, the Huffington Post, and Rolling Stone, as he alone has the courage to stand up for not just himself, the President of the United States but also all fair-minded and ethical Americans."

    Ok, then. If you think the lawsuit itself is a much more buttoned-down affair, then you haven't read a Larry Klayman complaint before. It starts with the usual stuff establishing standing before getting down to the focus of the complaint. The alleged defamation committed by all three defendants is referring to Joe Arpaio as a "convicted felon" when his only conviction was for a misdemeanor. Rolling Stone issued a correction but the other two defendants haven't corrected their original misstatements. Hence the lawsuit -- Arpaio and Klayman's public attempt to stick it to the "Left Fake News media."

    Here's why Arpaio feels he's owed $300 million for a couple of standing misstatements. Running for an open US Senate seat must pay really well.

    Plaintiff Arpaio’s chances and prospects of election to the U.S. Senate in 2020 have been severely harmed by the publication of false and fraudulent facts in the Defamatory Article. This also harms Plaintiff financially, as his chances of obtaining funding from the Republican establishment and donors for the 2020 election have been damaged by the publication of false and fraudulent representations in the Defamatory Article.

    Given the pardon issued to him by the Republican president currently in office, it seems unlikely his reputation suffered any damage from these incorrect statements. If anything, it only further damaged the reputation of these publications, at least in the eyes of Arpaio supporters (which presumably includes a sizeable percentage of Republican voters).

    Arpaio managed to survive hundreds of self-inflicted reputational wounds during his years as sheriff, so it's a bit of a stretch to claim three "fake news" sources have done anything more than further cement his reputation as a martyr to the cause.

    Arpaio also claims this has damaged his reputation within the law enforcement community. Again, it seems unlikely to have budged the needle there either. Law enforcement agencies tend to view the press with the same suspicion Arpaio does and probably agree the ex-sheriff was persecuted rather than prosecuted.

    Nevertheless, there's potential money to be made. And Klayman, representing Arpaio, isn't above using a federal lawsuit as soapbox. At times, the complaint [PDF] more resembles a transcript of a YouTube monologue than a statement of facts and allegations.

    Defendants are aware of these prospective business relationships and thus, given their malice and leftist enmity of Arpaio sought to destroy them with the publication of the subject Defamatory Publications.

    Defendants published the Defamatory Publications to influence the RNC, the RNCC and affiliated political action committee and persons, and other donors, to withhold funding for Plaintiff Arpaio’s 2020 political campaign by smearing and destroying his reputation and standing in his law enforcement, government and political community.

    Plaintiff Arpaio has been harmed as to his reputation as “America’s Toughest Sheriff” and financially by the publication of the Defamatory Article.

    [insert fire emoji]

    While it's true publications got the facts wrong, Joe Arpaio is an extremely public person. This raises the bar he must meet to succeed in this lawsuit. While the publications may have been careless in incorrectly noting the level of the offense that Arpaio was convicted for, that's not nearly enough to secure a favorable ruling.

    The difference between convicted felon and convicted misdemeanant probably doesn't mean much when placed in the totality of Arpaio's recent history. Arpaio was convicted of contempt and spent part of the last decade being investigated by the DOJ. Add this to his long history of civil liberties violations and refusal to adhere to court orders, and the difference between a felony conviction and a misdemeanor is a rounding error.

    Arpaio's reputation has been leaking hit points for a long time, but it has never affected his popularity with his presumed voter base. The rest of America may hate "America's Toughest Sheriff," but his supporters can't get enough of him. Three mistakes by three publications is unlikely to have caused $300-worth of damage to the ex-sheriff's Senatorial chances, much less $300 million. Some people are just defamation-proof and it's a good bet Joseph Arpaio is one of them.

    Arpaio's welcome to waste the court's time and his own money claiming the "fake news" media dinged his rust bucket of a reputation, but he's not going to be happy when the court apprises him of the above facts. The problem is these three publications will have to spend some money of their own defending against a seriously weak lawsuit. With the DC circuit having decided it doesn't need to apply the District's own anti-SLAPP law to federal cases, it's likely the defendants will be stuck with covering their own costs, even if they prevail. On top of that they'll have to deal with an opposing counsel with a penchant for pissing off judges and treating the courtroom like a heated Periscope broadcast. It's a waste of everyone's time and money but Klayman's. I'm pretty sure he didn't take this on contingency.



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    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 13:42:16 De: Techdirt Easily digestible tech news... Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:03
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  55. A New Engine Could Bring Back Supersonic Air-Travel

    An anonymous reader shares a report (may be paywalled): Every morning, time once was, a giant roar from Heathrow Airport would announce the departure of flight BA001 to New York. The roar was caused by the injection into the aircraft's four afterburners of the fuel which provided the extra thrust that it needed to take off. Soon afterwards, the pilot lit the afterburners again -- this time to accelerate his charge beyond the speed of sound for the three-and-a-half hour trip to JFK. The plane was Concorde. Supersonic passenger travel came to an end in 2003. The crash three years earlier of a French Concorde had not helped, but the main reasons were wider. One was the aircraft's Rolls-Royce/Snecma Olympus engines, afterburners and all, which gobbled up too much fuel for its flights to be paying propositions. The second was the boom-causing shock wave it generated when travelling supersonically. That meant the overland sections of its route had to be flown below Mach 1. For the Olympus, an engine optimised for travel far beyond the sound barrier, this was commercial death. That, however, was then. And this is now. Materials are lighter and stronger. Aerodynamics and the physics of sonic booms are better understood. There is also a more realistic appreciation of the market. As a result, several groups of aircraft engineers are dipping their toes back into the supersonic pool. Some see potential for planes with about half Concorde's 100-seat capacity. Others plan to start even smaller, with business jets that carry around a dozen passengers. The chances of such aircraft getting airborne have recently increased substantially.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 13:41:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  56. 'Donald' Is Now One of the Top 25 Most Commonly Used Passwords

    For the eighth year in a row, password management security company SplashData has scraped password dumps to find the worst passwords of the year. The company evaluated more than 5 million passwords leaked on the internet, excluding hacks of adult websites. This year, 'donald' has moved into the list of top 25 passwords, presumably a reference to President Donald Trump.

    Sure enough, the bad passwords of 2018 looked much like the bad passwords of 2017. The top two slots were unchanged: “123456” and “password” remained in first and second place. And like last year, SplashData estimated that almost 3 percent of people have used the worst password, and nearly 10 percent used one of the top 25 worst passwords.

    Additional repeat offenders epitomized predictability. They included ‘123456789,’ ‘12345678,’ ‘12345,’ ‘1234567,’ ‘qwerty,’ ‘iloveyou,’ ‘admin,’ ‘welcome,’ ‘abc123,’ ‘football,’ ‘123123,’ and ‘monkey.’

    But there were some changes on this year’s list… primarily numeric strings and such, but also “sunshine” (#8), princess (#11), charlie (#21) and donald (#23). Other new passwords this year were ‘111111,’ ‘666666,’ ‘654321,’ ‘!@#$%^&,’ ‘aa123456,’ ‘password1’ and ‘qwerty123.’ These replaced last years’ ‘letmein,’ ‘login,’ ‘starwars,’ ‘dragon,’ ‘passw0rd,’ ‘master,’ ‘hello,’ ‘freedom,’ ‘whatever,’ ‘qaxwsx,’ and ‘trustno1.’

    SpashData, Inc. CEO Morgan Slain, who was unsure who ‘Charlie’ was, said the biggest surprise was how slowly people’s behavior is changing as far as bad passwords go. “One of the reasons that we put this list out every year is to keep highlighting, ‘hey everybody you’re putting yourself at risk by using these familiar, weaker passwords over and over again,” he said.

    It seems surprising in this day and age that sites would even allow passwords with all-lowercase letters and no numbers or symbols.

    “Often these leaked passwords are from sites that have by definition weaker security, so either they don’t have those restrictions in place or maybe they’re an older site and these are older passwords,” said Slain. “It could be one or the other or both: weak security on the website or grandfathered-in old passwords that have never been changed based on the old policies. We hope that most robust sites and more recent sites would require stronger passwords, but they don’t always.”

    Last year, people tweaked the password “password” by adding a zero instead of the letter O. This year, users seem to have gone full nihilist and didn’t even attempt this (useless) tweak.

    Password advice hasn’t changed any more than people’s proclivity for awful, predictable passwords, but we’ll repeat it again: use unique passphrases for each account (so if one is hacked, you only have to change that password instead of 50 of them), and use a password manager to generate and store your passwords. Setting up two-factor authentication, especially when it’s generated on a phone app like Google Authenticator or on a small hardware device like Yubikey, can add an extra layer of security.

    The complete list of the 25 most common passwords SplashData found this year follows below:

    123456
    password
    123456789
    12345678
    12345
    111111
    1234567
    sunshine
    qwerty
    iloveyou
    princess
    admin
    welcome
    666666
    abc123
    football
    123123
    monkey
    654321
    !@#$%^&*
    charlie
    aa123456
    donald
    password1
    qwerty123

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 13:37:38 De: Motherboard RSS feed for https://motherboard.vice.com Dernière modification:
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  57. Daily Deal: Nix Mini Color Sensor

    Whether you're painting a room, designing a site, or anytime you're searching for just the perfect color, the Nix Mini Color Sensor is here to help. Simply scan any color critical surface, save it to your phone or tablet, and match it to an existing color library of more than 31,000 brand name paint colors, as well as RGB, HEX, CMYK, and LAB colors. It's smaller than a ping pong ball, and fits comfortably on your key chain. The Nix features high CRI white LEDs provide a consistent light source for every scan. It's on sale for $69 and comes with lifetime access to the Nix Paints and Nix Digital Android and iOS apps.

    Note: The Techdirt Deals Store is powered and curated by StackCommerce. A portion of all sales from Techdirt Deals helps support Techdirt. The products featured do not reflect endorsements by our editorial team.



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    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 13:37:16 De: Techdirt Easily digestible tech news... Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:03
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  58. Later School Day Start Times Benefit Teens, but Adults Must Pay the Price

    It’s no longer up for debate that high school start times in America are far too early. But as powerful as the evidence is that these early starts are detrimental to the health of teens, most of America still refuses to let them sleep in. If you ask the authors of a new Science Advances paper, showing concrete evidence that later school start times benefit teens, they’ll tell you it’s a persistent problem — but one that has more to do with economics than with public health.

    From a medical perspective, it’s clear that early start times are bad for youth. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the American Academy of Pediatrics have both issued policy statements urging schools to consider pushing back start times to 8:30 a.m. or later. But despite these warnings, 93 percent of high schools still start before 8 a.m., according to a CDC report from 2014. Horatio De La Iglesia Ph.D., first author of the new paper, tells Inverse that there are two major reasons that school districts and even some parents are hesitant to start their days a little later.

    Read More... Later School Day Start Times Benefit Teens, but Adults Must Pay the Price

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 13:35:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  59. MAD Architects curvaceous Himalayas Center nears completion in Nanjing

    Beijing-based architecture firm MAD Architects is nearing completion on yet another of their massive mountain-inspired projects: the Nanjing Zendai Himalayas Center. Inspired by the Chinese traditional painting style of ‘shan shui’ (‘mountain water’), the mixed-use development was designed as the “spiritual and poetic retreat in the middle of the city” and features curvaceous forms that mimic Nanjing’s surrounding mountains and waterways. In addition to its impressive mountain-like...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 13:30:56 De: Inhabitat Green design & innovation for a better world Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  60. Starbucks will offer Uber Eats delivery from more than 2,000 US stores

    It might be almost too easy to get a Starbucks fix in the near future. In the wake of trials, the coffee giant will offer delivery through Uber Eats from over 2,000 US stores (roughly a quarter of its footprint in the country) in early 2019. The co...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 13:25:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  61. Rotting Whale Carcasses Are Bringing Risk of Shark Swarms to Australian Coast

    More and more dead whales are washing up on the shores of Western Australia, luring swarms of hungry sharks to popular beaches.

    At least 44 whale carcasses were reported on or near the coastline this year, the state’s Department of Biodiversity and Conservation told The West Australian on Monday.

    That represents more than half of the 85 carcasses found over the past eight years, and excludes the 150 pilot whales that beached themselves in Western Australia’s Hamelin Bay in March for unknown reasons. The state expects the number of dead whales to keep growing.

    The messy aftermath of giant, decomposing corpses has been predictably sharky, and numerous beaches were closed this year due to shark alerts.

    In May, authorities scrambled to remove a putrefying 75-foot-long fin whale that left an “oil slick” of remains on a beach in Albany.

    A dead pilot whale calf on Swanbourne Beach last month prompted the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development to warn: “While it’s not uncommon for sharks to be present off the Western Australian coast throughout the year, people should exercise additional caution until the whale carcass is removed.”

    And according to Sharksmart, a website launched by the Western Australia government that provides real-time shark updates, a whale carcass currently near Yallingup “may continue to act as an attractant to sharks.”

    Western Australia researchers have tagged 542 resident sharks, including 297 great whites, as part of a government program to increase awareness about the ocean predators. Sharks outfitted with acoustic tags ping a network of satellite receivers, allowing authorities to monitor their whereabouts.

    The state’s relationship with sharks has been a tumultuous one. More than a dozen shark related deaths since 2012 bolstered a controversial movement that aimed to trap and kill those deemed an “imminent threat.” These methods were opposed by conservationists and eventually canned for lacking sufficient evidence.

    As for the historic rise in whale deaths, the state seems unworried, even attributing it to good news.

    “The humpback whale population recovery along the WA coastline is one of the strongest in the world for this species and it is likely that the numbers of whales migrating up the coast has increased in recent years,” said the Department of Biodiversity and Conservation.

    Indeed, humpbacks near Western Australia have rebounded to 90 percent of their pre-whaling numbers—a record-setting comeback for the species, according to a 2015 survey by Australian researchers.

    The agency said this year’s deaths were due to “natural attrition” and that it’s reasonable to expect mortality to be proportionate to population size.

    However, other whale deaths, such as the mass stranding of 150 pilot whales in Hamelin Bay, are more mysterious. Scientists speculated at the time that “illness, navigation errors, and human interference” may have been to blame.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 13:23:00 De: Motherboard RSS feed for https://motherboard.vice.com Dernière modification:
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  62. Endangered northern bettongs aren’t picky truffle eaters

    Without the northern bettong, the variety of Australia’s truffle-producing fungi could take a hit, a new study finds.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 13:21:43 De: Science News Daily news, blogs and biweekly magazine articles from Science News. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 18:27
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  63. “We’re sorry,” Facebook says, again—new photo bug affects millions

    Enlarge (credit: JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)

    Another day, another privacy issue with Facebook.

    The company announced Friday morning that a photo API bug might have resulted in millions of people having their private photos become improperly accessible by up to 1,500 apps for a period of 12 days in September 2018.

    As Facebook described it in a blog post by Tomer Bar, a company staffer:

    Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 13:19:30 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  64. 'Mortal Engines' Thunders in as One of 2018's Most Surprising Movies

    If you’ve ever wished Mad Max had less grit and a wider, more juvenile Young Adult appeal, then Mortal Engines is for you.

    Look, I will never think that roaming cities on wheels is anything but a profoundly dumb concept for a dystopia, but the most surprising thing about Mortal Engines — a movie that wields that very premise — was how much I loved it. Despite getting a ton of negative reviews, Mortal Engines is a thrilling and unexpected ride that takes tired dystopian cliches and flips them upside down. It may feel familiar at times, there’s still tons of interesting action and plenty of surprises.

    Read More... 'Mortal Engines' Thunders in as One of 2018's Most Surprising Movies

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 13:12:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
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  65. ZipRecruiter has been flying low: User email addresses exposed to unauthorised accounts

    Looking for work? Spammers could well be looking for you

    Tinder for job-seekers ZipRecruiter has copped to a data breach after the names and email addresses of job-seekers were flung to the wind in a permissions screw-up.…

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 13:00:07 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  66. Facebook Says A Bug May Have Exposed The Unposted Photos Of Millions Of Users

    A day after hosting a pop-up store in New York City's Bryant Park to explain how privacy is the "foundation of the company," Facebook disclosed that a security flaw potentially exposed the public and private photos of as many as 6.8 million users to developers. From a report: On Friday, the Menlo Park, California-based company said in a blog post that it discovered a bug in late September that gave third-party developers the ability to access users' photos, including those that had been uploaded to Facebook's servers but not publicly shared on any of its services. The security flaw, which exposed photos for 12 days between Sept. 13 and Sept. 25, affected up to 1,500 apps from 876 developers, according to Facebook. "We're sorry this happened," Facebook said in the post. "Early next week we will be rolling out tools for app developers that will allow them to determine which people using their app might be impacted by this bug. We will be working with those developers to delete the photos from impacted users." Facebook has not yet responded to questions about whether company representatives staffing its privacy pop-ups yesterday were aware of this security flaw as they were meeting with reporters and customers to discuss privacy.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 13:00:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  67. Experts Urge U.S. to Continue Support for Nuclear Fusion Research

    An international fusion project could help the nation eventually develop its own, smaller reactor

    -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 13:00:00 De: Scientific American Science news and technology updates from Scientific American Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  68. Chinese hackers reportedly hit Navy contractors with multiple attacks

    Chinese hackers have been targeting US Navy contractors, and were reportedly successful on several occasions over the last 18 months. The infiltrators stole information including missile plans and ship maintenance data, according to a Wall Street Jou...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 12:58:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  69. Join Blue Planet II Live-Tweet

    Starting December 16, ocean scientists will live-tweet the BBC documentary series Blue Planet II, available via Netflix.

    -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 12:54:00 De: Scientific American Science news and technology updates from Scientific American Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  70. Despite Government Crackdown, Kratom Scientists Awarded $3.5M for Research

    The controversial plant kratom, a drug with opioid-like properties, is directly in the crosshairs of American federal regulators. Because it has some similarities to problematic opioids like oxycodone and fentanyl, multiple government agencies have attempted, with some success, to severely curtail its availability. That’s why it was so unexpected when on Monday the University of Florida announced it had a received a $3.5 million grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to research the drug.

    The two-year grant, awarded to researchers in the school’s College of Pharmacy, will fund studies on the dozen or so active compounds in the plant, not just mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine, the two that are most commonly studied and most abundant in the plant. The hope is that understanding the various chemical ways in which kratom generates its effects will help both scientists and federal regulators determine whether kratom is safe and effective as a medicine.

    Read More... Despite Government Crackdown, Kratom Scientists Awarded $3.5M for Research

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 12:54:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  71. For these critically endangered marine turtles, climate change could be a knockout blow

    Researchers suggest that projected increases in air temperatures, rainfall inundation and blistering solar radiation could significantly reduce hawksbill hatching success at a selection of major nesting beaches.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 12:40:52 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  72. Can stem cells help a diseased heart heal itself? Researcher achieves important milestone

    Scientists have taken an important step toward the goal of making diseased hearts heal themselves -- a new model that would reduce the need for bypass surgery, heart transplants or artificial pumping devices.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 12:40:49 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  73. Self-perception and reality seem to line-up when it comes to judging our own personality

    When it comes to personality, it turns out your peers probably think the same way about you as you do about yourself.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 12:40:45 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  74. Get your binge on: Season 3 of sci-fi gem Travelers is out now

    Enlarge / Travelers. (credit: Netflix)

    One of our favorite streaming shows of the last few years has been time-travel adventure Travelers.

    The world of the future is in some ill-defined crisis, and the only way this can be averted is to send people back in time to make better decisions. But in a Quantum Leap-style twist, only people's consciousnesses can be sent back in time. To minimize disruption to the timelines, the mastermind of this plan, the Director, uses people who were just about to die as its targets, narrowly averting their deaths (at least most of the time) and allowing a traveler to resume their life.

    Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 12:40:10 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  75. Super Injunction Silences News About Vatican Official's Child Molestation Conviction, And That's Bullshit

    We've written in the past about things like "super injunctions" in the UK and elsewhere that often put a huge and near absolute gag order on writing about a famous person enmeshed in some sort of scandal, and apparently Australia has such a thing as well -- and it's now scaring off tons of publications from writing about the fact that George Pell, the Vatican's CFO and often called the "3rd most powerful person in the Vatican" was convicted on all charges that he sexually molested choir boys in Australia in the 1990s. However, the press is barred from reporting on it based on one of those gag orders. The Herald Sun in Australia did post a brilliant, Streisand Effect-inducing front page display about how it was being censored from publishing an important story:

    Front page of Thursday's edition of Australia's Herald Sun: "CENSORED"

    "A statement to our readers...The world is reading a very important story that is relevant to Victorians. The Herald Sun is prevented from publishing details of this significant news." https://t.co/bzFOluucy9 pic.twitter.com/J0vSkBrB1g

    — Oliver Darcy (@oliverdarcy) December 12, 2018

    Though, if you click on the link in that tweet it now shows an error message reading Error 400 and "Content is deleted, expired or legal killed." Legal killed.

    And here's the thing. Very few publications -- even those outside of Australia -- seem to be willing to pick up on the story. To their credit, the NY Post, owned by Australian Rupert Murdoch has posted about it as has Margaret Sullivan at the Washington Post, who included an impassioned plea for this kind of censorship to not be allowed to continue.

    The secrecy surrounding the court case — and now the verdict — is offensive. That’s especially so because it echoes the secrecy that has always been so appalling a part of widespread sexual abuse by priests.

    That has changed a great deal in recent years — in part because of the Boston Globe’s Pulitzer Prize-winning investigation in 2002 that broke open a global scandal and was the subject of the Oscar-winning film “Spotlight.” (Current Washington Post Executive Editor Martin Baron was executive editor at the Globe at that time.)

    But clearly, it hasn’t changed entirely. And the news media shouldn’t be forced to be a part of keeping these destructive secrets.

    Steven Spaner, Australia coordinator from the Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests told the Daily Beast he felt frustrated and left “in the dark” because of the suppression of news about Pell.

    “It’s hard to know if there are any shenanigans going on — things the church did that are illegal themselves,” he said. “There is always suspicion when you don’t know what is going on.”

    The story itself was actually broken by The Daily Beast (first link up top), but as that site's editor told Sullivan at the Washington Post, they were a bit worried about doing so:

    Editor in chief Noah Shachtman told me that he waded carefully into the dangerous legal waters.

    “We understood there could be legal, and even criminal, consequences if we ran this story,” said. “But ultimately, this was an easy call. You’ve got a top Vatican official convicted of a horrific crime. That’s major, major news. The public deserves to know about it.”

    Shachtman said the Daily Beast did its best to honor the suppression order, consulting with attorneys here and in Australia, and even “geo-blocking” the article so that it would be harder to access in Australia, and keeping headlines “relatively neutral.”

    If you do look around, there are a bunch of news articles, including some in Australia, all published after the verdict, talking about how the Pope has "removed" Pell from his "inner circle" and hinting at "historical sexual offences" but not saying that he's been convicted. And even the news of the removal is made to sound rather benign:

    A Vatican spokesman said Francis had written to the prelates “thanking them for the work they have done over these past five years”.

    Or here's an article from the Australian again published after the conviction, but not mentioning a word of it, and making it sound like Pell's removal was merely his term being up:

    The Vatican said it had written to Cardinal Pell and his two colleagues in late October, telling them their roles on the C9 council had expired at the end of their five-year tenure.

    [....]

    “In October, the Pope had written to three of the more ­elderly cardinals — Cardinal Pell from Australia, Cardinal ­Errazuriz from Chile and Cardinal Monsengwo of Congo — thanking them for their work,” he said.

    “After a five-year term, these three have passed out for the ­moment.”

    And the Washington Post's Editor, Marty Baron, has now had to defend publishing Sullivan's piece:

    Statement from @washingtonpost editor @PostBaron about Australian press suppression order involving conviction of Cardinal George Pell: pic.twitter.com/pxUv3Zgimf

    — Paul Farhi (@farhip) December 13, 2018

    If you can't read that, it says:

    This story is a matter of major news significance involving an individual of global prominence. A fundamental principle of The Washington Post is to report the news truthfully, which we did. While we always consider guidelines given by courts and governments, we must ultimately use our judgment and exercise our right to publish such consequential news. Freedom of the press in the world will cease to exist if a judge in one country is allowed to bar publication of information anywhere in the world.

    It seems heavily implied by this statement that the Washington Post has been contacted about its story.

    Some may argue that there is, in fact, a good reason for the suppression orders. Specifically, the idea is to have trials of prominent figures be "impartial" and not influenced by media coverage. And you can understand the basic reasoning for that -- though, in this case, there is already a conviction, and that seems obviously newsworthy. The response to that argument is that Pell is still facing more such charges in another trial. I'm sympathetic to these arguments, but only to the point that I understand the emotional position from which those arguments are made. I cannot, however, agree that they are good reasons. Yes, media sensationalism around a trial can be an issue, but in the US we've been able to deal with that fairly successfully over the years with the way courts treat jurors and order them not to read the press coverage. Is it a perfect system? Nope. Not at all. But it does mostly function. On the flip side, the ability to do damage through these gag orders is immense.

    Among other things, it hides the details of what's happening at the trial, and those details can really matter, as Sullivan's article quote above makes clear. In addition, only being able to reveal details way after the fact very much dilutes or even totally destroys the impact of such stories. It is much harder to make people care about this news much later, after it has been suppressed, than when it first comes out.

    On top of that, all of this relies on the idea that those issuing these gag orders always do so with the best of intentions, and that's a huge leap of faith. The opportunity for mischief here is great, as we've seen in the UK with some of its super injunctions.

    This kind of thing is one of the reasons why we're so concerned here about encroachments on free speech by governments. The ability to order platforms to censor material is a massively slippery slope. Indeed, in searching for the news coverage about this, I couldn't find any of the actual coverage of the convictions on Google News. I could only find the stories about the much more tame "removed from the inner circle." It may be that Google News algorithms picked up on that story more prominently (in part because there are many more such stories) or it could be because Australia has told Google News not to post such stories. At the very least, it's ambiguous and concerning.

    Having a free and open press is a pretty key aspect of democracy. Australia is making it clear that it doesn't buy into that, and tragically, it's leading to new publications around the world choosing not to report on a huge story with immense public impact.



    Permalink | Comments | Email This Story

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 12:40:00 De: Techdirt Easily digestible tech news... Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:03
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  76. This Alien World Is Evaporating Faster Than Any Known Planet

    Some 97 light years from Earth, a Neptune-sized exoplanet is disappearing.

    Discovered in 2012, GJ 3470b is about four times the size of Earth and orbits its star at a tenth of the distance between Mercury and the Sun. As a result of this proximity, the planet is wasting away at a record pace, scientists reported on Thursday in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics, as stellar radiation and wind blows off its upper atmosphere.

    "GJ 3470b is losing more of its mass than any other planet we've seen so far; in only a few billion years from now, half of the planet may be gone,” said study co-author David Sing, an exoplanet expert at Johns Hopkins, in a statement. “This is the smoking gun that planets can lose a significant fraction of their entire mass."

    The researchers, led by astronomer Vincent Bourrier of the University of Geneva, observed three transits of GJ 3470b using the Hubble Space Telescope, which enabled them to calculate the planet’s probable evaporation rate.

    The team estimates that GJ 3470b may have already lost as much as 35 percent of its mass since it was born two billion years ago. All that remains of those layers is an extended gas cloud that envelopes this fading world.

    Read More: Explore Distant Exoplanets With These NASA Simulations

    The results of the study shed light on the curious absence of similarly Neptune-sized planets observed in close orbits around their stars. Scientists have discovered loads of “hot Jupiters,” large gas giants close to stars, as well as Earth-scale exoplanets that have a stellar front row seat. Bourrier’s team suggests that Neptune-sized planets may occupy tight orbits too, but they simply can’t take the heat, and eventually diminish into smaller worlds.

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    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 12:38:56 De: Motherboard RSS feed for https://motherboard.vice.com Dernière modification:
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  77. Grave accident suite à une intervention policière à Longueuil

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 12:35:40 De: Zone911 - Tout le Quebec ZONE911 est un média collaboratif de l'actualité et de l'information du domaine de l'urgence au Québec. Pompiers, policiers, paramédics, sécurité et plus. Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  78. Mecanoo unveils stunning glass lake house that harmonizes with nature

    Related: + Mecanoo Via Archdaily Mecanoo, Villa on the Lake,

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 12:30:45 De: Inhabitat Green design & innovation for a better world Dernière modification:
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  79. ‘Travis Strikes Again’ is an indie-sized comeback for Suda51

    In 2010, Goichi Suda seemed unstoppable. The Japanese game developer, known by his nickname 'Suda51,' had just released No More Heroes 2: Desperate Struggle, a vibrant clash of stylized decapitations and eccentric, oftentimes sexually-charged humor....

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 12:30:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  80. Hiding in Plain Sight: The YouTubers' Crowdfunding Piracy

    Some YouTube channels are publishing full-length episodes of TV shows, rights of which they obviously do not own, and on top of this, they are trying to crowdfund their piracy efforts by asking viewers to donate some cash. From a report: YouTube creators asking for money is nothing new, be it through the site's built-in membership features or third-party services such as Patreon. But trying to profit off someone else's intellectual property isn't the same as asking for support on an original video they've created. The person who runs the Kitchen Nightmares Hotel Hell and Hell's Kitchen channel did not respond to multiple requests for comment from Engadget, but their Patreon page (named YoIUploadShows) isn't coy. "Hey! It's not as easy as you might think to make my content, I have to look for the best quality episodes I can find, download them, convert them, edit them, render them and upload them," YoIUploadShows' Patreon page reads. "This can sometimes take at least a few hours. Especially because the downloads are usually slow and the rendering itself can take a couple hours, because I started making all my uploads in HD instead of 480p to give them a little extra clarity." It's not easy, folks, so for that he or she "would really appreciate the extra support if you have any money to spare :)"

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 12:25:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  81. 'Last Jedi' Killed Snoke, but Andy Serkis Wishes He Could Be in 'Episode 9'

    We’ll never know if the First Order would’ve fared better under Supreme Leader Snoke’s guidance in the upcoming Star Wars: Episode IX rather than Kylo Ren, but the actor behind the powerful Dark side Force-user wishes we could’ve found out.

    In an interview published Thursday by Games Radar to promote his new Netflix film Mowgli, Andy Serkis spoke about his role as Supreme Leader Snoke and how shocked he was to learn about the character’s death in The Last Jedi.

    “It was a bit of a shock, but I could see exactly why they were going that route,” Serkis said, referring to a scene in the middle of The Last Jedi when Kylo Ren uses the Force to ignite the blue Skywalker lightsaber and sliced Snoke in half. “I think it was a huge surprise in the middle of the film. But I really loved the scene where Rey plays with Snoke. That scene was a fantastic. I just wish he’d survived, but who knows?”

    Read More... 'Last Jedi' Killed Snoke, but Andy Serkis Wishes He Could Be in 'Episode 9'

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 12:22:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  82. Early physical therapy can reduce risk, amount of long-term opioid use, study finds

    Patients who underwent physical therapy soon after being diagnosed with pain in the shoulder, neck, low back or knee were approximately 7 to 16 percent less likely to use opioids in the subsequent months, according to a new study.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 12:18:14 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  83. HIV vaccine protects non-human primates from infection

    New research shows that an experimental HIV vaccine strategy works in non-human primates. In the study, rhesus macaque monkeys produced neutralizing antibodies against one strain of HIV that resembles the resilient viral form that most commonly infects people, called a Tier 2 virus.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 12:18:11 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  84. Adhesives for biomedical applications can be detached with light

    Pulling off a little plastic bandage may soon get a lot less painful. Researchers have developed a new type of adhesive that can strongly adhere wet materials -- such as hydrogel and living tissue -- and be easily detached with a specific frequency of light. The adhesives could be used to attach and painlessly detach wound dressings, transdermal drug delivery devices, and wearable robotics.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 12:18:08 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  85. Colorado River Delta report provides restoration road map

    Four growing seasons after the engineered spring flood of the Colorado River Delta in March 2014, the delta's birds, plants and groundwater continue to benefit. The diversity and abundance of birds of special conservation concern remains high in the restoration sites, groundwater was recharged and some of the trees are now more than 14 feet (4.2 meters) tall, according to a new article.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 12:18:06 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  86. A New 'Game of Thrones' Theory Gives Jaime a Very Important Role to Play

    As the clock ticks down to the Game of Thrones Season 8 premiere date — we know it’s sometime in April 2019, but when?!? — speculation over which characters will prevail in the coming battle against the Night King and his undead army keeps ramping up.

    Now, a new theory with some strong evidence behind it suggests that one character could be destined to stop the Night King: Jamie Lannister. It might be a bit of a stretch, but we wouldn’t rule it out entirely. At the very least, it’s something fun to think about while you wait for Game of Thrones Season 8 to actually release.

    Read More... A New 'Game of Thrones' Theory Gives Jaime a Very Important Role to Play

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 12:08:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  87. Discord Store to offer developers 90 percent of game revenues

    Enlarge / Discord wants to attract more developers to its game store as it continues to expand beyond simple communications features.

    Discord has announced that it will start taking a reduced, 10-percent cut from game revenues generated on its online store starting next year, one-upping the Epic Games Store and its recently announced 12-percent cut on the Epic Games Store.

    "We talked to a lot of developers, and many of them feel that current stores are not earning their 30% of the usual 70/30 revenue share," Discord writes in the announcement. "Because of this, we now see developers creating their own stores and launchers to distribute their games instead of focusing on what’s really important—making great games and cultivating amazing communities.

    "Turns out, it does not cost 30% to distribute games in 2018," the announcement continues. "After doing some research, we discovered that we can build amazing developer tools, run them, and give developers the majority of the revenue share."

    Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 12:06:53 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  88. Better get cramming... Xamarin University due to close early next year

    Orphaned cross-platform code students, your new home is Microsoft Learn

    Cross-platform dev darling Xamarin is to shutter its online University in favour of Microsoft Learn as its absorption into the Windows giant continues.…

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 12:00:05 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  89. You Can't Save a Species If It Doesn't Have a Name

    A newly discovered plant genus could be wiped out by dams and mining. Could giving it a name save it from extinction?

    -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 12:00:00 De: Scientific American Science news and technology updates from Scientific American Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  90. Hacker Banner Ads Are Totally Wild

    Even hackers need to pull customers in. Part of that may be writing forum threads advertising their services, giving out ‘review’ copies of their tools, or getting other hackers to vouch for them. But one staple of underground forums is ridiculously over the top, 90s style banner ads, designed to grab the attention of potentially interested cybercriminals.

    The adverts are “somewhat of a throwback to an older way of developing websites,” Harrison Van Riper, senior analyst in intelligence development at cybersecurity firm Digital Shadows told Motherboard in an email. “You look at modern web design, you don’t see a lot of flashy banner advertisements like this, it’s very much an old school way to present content. Since a lot of these sites advocate the hacker lifestyle, these ads are call backs to earlier times.”

    Motherboard is presenting a sample of some of the most audacious and straight-up bizarre hacking adverts, pulled from a variety of underground sites selling stolen credit card details, botnets, fake identity documents, hacker-for-hire services, and bitcoin laundering services. Motherboard does not condone any of the services offered here, and is sharing them as a slice of criminal hacker culture. Don’t buy from them if you enjoy not being indicted.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 12:00:00 De: Motherboard RSS feed for https://motherboard.vice.com Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  91. Signal says it can't allow government access to users' chats

    Last week, the Australian government passed the country's controversial Access and Assistance Bill 2018 into law, legislation that allows government agencies to demand access to encrypted communications. Companies that don't comply with the new law c...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 11:58:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  92. ‘Marie’ Is the First Life-Sized, 3D-Printed Human Body

    Meet Marie, the very first life-sized 3D-printed human body made from bioplastic, developed by LSU engineering student Meagan Moore to test real-time radiation exposure and figure out optimal radiation therapy dosing for treating conditions like cancer.

    According to an LSU press release, Marie is five-foot-one-inch tall and weighs 15 pounds. She also has a detachable head, and a 36-gallon water storage capacity for up to eight hours.

    Also, Marie is also a lovely shade of purple. (“Purple was on sale,” Moore said in a press release.)

    Marie is the amalgamation of five full-body scans of women taken at Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, per an LSU press release. Then, over the course of 136 hours, LSU’s BigRep industrial 3D printer churned out Marie. But the 3D printer had to produce Marie in four chunks, so Moore used “a combination of soldering, friction stir welding, and sandblasting” to piece her together.

    Image: LSU.

    To be clear, Marie isn’t a product of bioprinting, or the process of applying 3D printing technology to create biological tissue. Scientists have used this process to transplant artificial organs into rats, and for years, the US Army has been actively looking into making bioprinted hearts, blood vessels, and even skin.

    In the future, according to Moore, Marie could potentially to create personalized treatments for people with complex forms of cancer. “Children and breast cancer patients have really differing morphology that is usually very difficult to treat,” Moore said in a press release. “I find that the more we learn about any body, the more complex it’s going to be. We’re still getting medicine wrong on a lot of levels. We have a lot to learn.”

    For the record, Motherboard was not able to confirm whether Marie was named after famed radiation scientist Marie Curie, but the scenario seems likely.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 11:45:39 De: Motherboard RSS feed for https://motherboard.vice.com Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  93. Chinese Hackers Breach US Navy Contractors

    Chinese hackers are breaching Navy contractors to steal everything from ship-maintenance data to missile plans, triggering a top-to-bottom review of cyber vulnerabilities, WSJ reported Friday, citing officials and experts. From the report: A series of incidents in the past 18 months has pointed out the service's weaknesses, highlighting what some officials have described as some of the most debilitating cyber campaigns linked to Beijing. Cyberattacks affect all branches of the armed forces but contractors for the Navy and the Air Force are viewed as choice targets for hackers seeking advanced military technology, officials said. Navy contractors have suffered especially troubling breaches over the past year, one U.S. official said. The data allegedly stolen from Navy contractors and subcontractors often is highly sensitive, classified information about advanced military technology, according to U.S. officials and security researchers. The victims have included large contractors as well as small ones, some of which are seen as lacking the resources to invest in securing their networks. One major breach of a Navy contractor, reported in June, involved the theft of secret plans to build a supersonic anti-ship missile planned for use by American submarines, according to officials.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 11:40:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  94. These People Are Not Real—They Were Created By AI

    Computers are getting better at generating fake images and video of people saying or doing things they never did in real life. The latest work from chip maker Nvidia takes this a step further by generating convincing-looking images of people who never existed in the first place—they’re AI creations, but they look incredibly real.

    Machine-learning enthusiasts have been freaking out about the results of Nvidia’s latest work—published to the arXiv preprint server this week—and for good reason. Not only do the images produced by the AI program look crystal clear and hyper-realistic, but the process for creating them was rather novel and opens up some mind-blowing possibilities.

    The researchers combined the typical design of Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs)—computing architecture that very loosely mimics the human brain and “learns” from source images to generate new ones—with tips from the world of AI style transfer. In doing this, the Nvidia researchers could effectively blend human features to generate faces that morph in surprising and impressive ways.

    While this no doubt raises the specter of rampant AI-generated images fooling us into thinking they’re real, it’s worth noting that pulling this off took a week of AI training on eight Nvidia Tesla graphics processors that cost thousands of dollars each—not something you find in your average gaming rig.

    Get six of our favorite Motherboard stories every day by signing up for our newsletter.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 11:39:12 De: Motherboard RSS feed for https://motherboard.vice.com Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  95. DNAFit's at-home blood test wrote my 2019 resolutions for me

    What do you get the amateur athlete who already bought the fancy shoes, had their gait analyzed and owns a too-tight triathlon onesie? Genetic testing, of course. It's in this field that weekend warriors are now looking for ways to shave seconds from...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 11:30:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  96. Here Are All the Character Changes Included in 'Smash Bros. Ultimate' 1.2

    If you’re an avid Super Smash Bros. Ultimate player, you may be aware that Nintendo rolled out the game’s first big post-launch update, a “v1.2.0” patch. And if you’re sweating changes to several specific characters and the reworked tier lists that come with it, worry not. Most of the changes in 1.2.0 appear to fix technical glitches, with little to no actual changes to character rankings.

    On Thursday, Nintendo rolled out patch 1.2.0 for Smash Bros. Ultimate that, for the most part, fixes technical issues with the game’s online multiplayer. Other updates included tweaks to several specific characters, but Nintendo was opaque about what changes were made.

    Read More... Here Are All the Character Changes Included in 'Smash Bros. Ultimate' 1.2

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 11:13:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  97. Quantum chemical calculations on quantum computers

    A new quantum algorithm has been implemented for quantum chemical calculations such as Full-CI on quantum computers without exponential/combinatorial explosion, giving exact solutions of Schroedinger Equations for atoms and molecules, for the first time.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 11:08:05 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  98. How complexity science can quickly detect climate record anomalies

    When making sense of the massive amount of information packed into an ice core, scientists face a forensic challenge: how best to separate the useful information from the corrupt. Tools from information theory, a branch of complexity science, can quickly flag which segments, in over a million data points, require further investigation.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 11:07:58 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  99. Scientists warn of slow progress towards United Nations biodiversity targets

    Researchers praises widespread commitment but call for broader participation to better protect global marine ecosystems.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 11:07:50 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  100. Blizzard shifts developers away from Heroes of the Storm

    Enlarge / Heroes of the Storm will continue to increase this character roster going forward, but maybe not as quickly as previously.

    Blizzard may only have seven active games listed on its Battle.net launcher at the moment, but that list includes some of the biggest in the gaming world. So when the company announces it's shifting its development priorities away from one of those ongoing online titles, it's a big deal.

    So it is with last night's surprise update on the status of Blizzard-universe MOBA Heroes of the Storm. Blizzard now says "we need to take some of our talented developers and bring their skills to other projects," and thus has "made the difficult decision to shift some developers from Heroes of the Storm to other teams."

    This doesn't mean the immediate end of the game or anything of the sort. Blizzard promises continued active support, "with new heroes, themed events, and other content that our community loves, though the cadence will change." We're guessing that last part means the "cadence" will get less frequent, for what it's worth.

    Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 11:07:36 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  101. Cloud giants, enterprise refreshes keep storage market poppin': Global sales up 20% in Q3

    IBM and Hitachi fail to surf crest of spending wave as rivals seize the day

    IDC's Q3 storage tracker numbers show a tier of the tech industry growing by almost a fifth versus the same period a year ago, though not all of the big players are keeping pace. Looking at you IBM and Hitachi.…

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 11:00:11 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  102. We Might Not Have Enough Materials for All the Solar Panels and Wind Turbines We Need, an Analysis Finds

    An anonymous reader writes: Plenty of high-tech electronic components, like solar panels, rechargeable batteries, and complex circuits require specific rare metals. These can include magnetic neodymium, electronic indium, and silver, along with lesser-known metals like praseodymium, dysprosium, and terbium. These metals are mined in large quantities in countries around the world, and they make their way into the supply chains of all sorts of electronics and renewables companies. A group of researchers from the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure determined how many of these important metals will be required by 2050 in order to make enough solar panels and wind turbines to effectively combat climate change. With plenty of countries, states, cities, and companies pledging to go 100 percent renewable by 2050, the number of both solar panels and wind turbines is expected to skyrocket. According to the analysis, turbines and solar panels might be skyrocketing a bit too much. Demand for some metals like neodymium and indium could grow by more than a dozen times by 2050, and there simply might not be enough supply to power the green revolution.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 11:00:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  103. The Future of American Broadband Is a Comcast Monopoly

    The FCC this week released a new, 182-page Communications Marketplace Report it claims proves the US broadband industry is awash with vibrant competition. In reality, consumer groups, third-party data and the report itself paint a starkly different picture; one where consumers increasingly only have access to just one ISP: Comcast.

    FCC Chairman Ajit Pai attempted to put a rosy spin on the report, and commissioner Brandon Carr issued a statement claiming it showed unprecedented competition and price reductions across the broadband market thanks to Pai’s policies.

    “This is not like any competition we’ve seen before,” Carr proclaimed. “After broadband investment fell during the final two years of the last Administration, the key indicators have turned around. Broadband investment is up. Speeds have increased. Infrastructure deployments have accelerated. And prices have declined. All great signs for consumers.”

    But actual consumer groups and the FCC’s own data indicate a different reality.

    For one thing, all publicly-available earnings data and public CEO statements contradict Carr’s claim that investment declined during the last two years of the previous FCC, something both ISPs and the Pai FCC have repeatedly, falsely attempted to blame on net neutrality.

    The FCC also appears to have simply buried many of the less flattering portions of the report under layers of policy arcana and footnotes. For example, data showing that DSL providers like Windstream and CenturyLink routinely fail to deliver advertised speeds is buried on page 474 of a 581 page collection of associated appendices few will read:

    Image: FCC



    Most DSL providers still fail to deliver the FCC’s base definition of broadband (25 Mbps) to huge swaths of their footprints. Why? Despite billions in subsidies over the years, upgrading these aging networks isn’t profitable enough, quickly enough, for Wall Street’s liking. As a result, many telcos have shifted their focus elsewhere, leaving frustrated users in their wake.

    As a result, companies like Comcast and Charter Spectrum are quietly securing a greater monopoly over broadband. Less competition means that, contrary to Carr’s claims, American consumers continue to pay some of the highest prices for broadband in the developed world—while receiving some of the worst customer service of any sector in America.

    Few companies are eager to go head to head with Comcast. And towns and cities frustrated by a lack of options often run into protectionist laws passed in more than 21 states (quite literally written by giant ISPs) when they attempt to build their own networks.

    Other contradictory findings are similarly buried deep in the FCC’s latest report. Page 48, for example, quietly informs readers that telco fiber upgrades “appear to have slowed recently,” highlighting both CenturyLink and Google Fiber’s stalled ambitions.

    Consumer groups weren’t particularly impressed by the FCC’s claims.

    “This slowdown coincides with the complete deregulation of the ISP industry under the “Restoring Internet Freedom Order” and a massive tax cut stimulus from Congress to the tune of billions,” the EFF said in a blog post. “We are the only advanced market in the world to take this approach to the broadband industry and the results of dwindling and declining competition for the future comes as no surprise.”

    The EFF says its own data indicates that 68 million American households either have access to no broadband or just one ISP (most often Comcast), resulting in prices that are 200 to 400 percent higher in uncompetitive markets.

    While many look to fifth-generation (5G) wireless to provide supplemental competition, 5G’s impact could be muted courtesy of both Sprint and T-Mobile’s looming megamerger and the monopoly AT&T and Verizon enjoy over cellular tower connectivity.

    Lawmakers and Pai’s own fellow Commissioners have also stated that the FCC and industry’s coverage claims are far too generous, something the FCC itself acknowledged just this week.

    “The draft report says that nearly one hundred percent of our country is served by one or more LTE wireless providers, which is a joke,” argued US Representative Mike Doyle in a statement.

    At the heart of the problem is the FCC’s broadband mapping methodology, which declares an entire zip code “served” by broadband if just one home in a census tract has service. Efforts to improve this methodology have repeatedly been derailed by ISP lobbyists with a vested interest in protecting the broken, but profitable, status quo, critics charge.

    “In evaluating the availability and competition in the fixed broadband market, the Commission continues to rely on self-reported data by broadband providers and has been found to be inaccurate and overstates service availability in much of the US,” consumer group Public Knowledge said in a statement.

    Users looking to confirm the FCC’s rose-colored-glasses approach to measuring broadband need only go check out the agency’s $350 million national broadband map, which routinely hallucinates both competitors and the speeds they’re able to offer consumers.

    While the FCC insists that broadband is getting cheaper, faster, and more widely available thanks to its recent policies (like killing net neutrality), most American consumers’ first-hand experiences—and the FCC’s own data—continue to paint a dramatically different picture.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 11:00:00 De: Motherboard RSS feed for https://motherboard.vice.com Dernière modification:
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  104. Discord will let anyone sell games on its platform

    In an effort to usurp Steam's position as the one-stop shop for gamers, Discord announced that it will open up its game store for all developers in 2019. Game makers who choose to use the Discord store will receive 90 percent of the revenue share. Me...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 11:00:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  105. 'Runaways' Season 2 Review: The Highest Stakes of Any Marvel TV Show

    Now, more than ever, Marvel’s Runaways is starting to feel like the junior league Avengers, doing for Marvel what Young Justice or, to a lesser extent, Titans, has done for DC Comics shows. Season 2 delivers compelling interpersonal teen drama that caters to fans of The OC and Gossip Girl, but it also delivers truly intense stakes that threaten the entire Marvel Cinematic Universe as we know it.

    Yeah, this doesn’t even begin to compare to Avengers: Infinity War, but it definitely has everything from Legion to Marvel’s now defunct Netflix shows beat.

    The entire 13-episode Runaways Season 2 hits Hulu on December 21, and even though it technically takes place inside the broader Marvel Cinematic Universe, it’s unlikely we’ll ever see a crossover happen. Thankfully, that doesn’t stop the series from ramping up to its own apocalyptic climax.

    Read More... 'Runaways' Season 2 Review: The Highest Stakes of Any Marvel TV Show

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 11:00:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  106. What I Learned By Quitting Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Google, and Microsoft

    In May I made the decision to excise the so-called “Big Five” tech companies from my life for a month. That meant no services offered by Google, Microsoft, Amazon, Facebook, Apple, or any of their subsidiaries.

    There were a number of reasons I wanted to undertake this experiment, ranging from reclaiming my privacy to learning more about how the technology I use every day actually works. The main reason, however, was simply to see if the Big Five services were actually necessary or merely convenient.

    I found that there were adequate open-source or independent replacements for pretty much every major Big Five service. In some cases, such as mapping software or social media platforms, the gulf between the Big Five and alternative services was so large that it made a noticeable, negative impact on my life. But in most cases, the open-source or independent alternatives worked just fine and it was simply a matter of getting used to their quirks.

    I’ve written a long reflection and extensive guide to quitting the Big Five if you’re interested in hearing more about how the experiment went. If you just want to know some of the main takeaways from my month without Google, Amazon, Facebook, Apple, and Microsoft, this list is for you:

    FACEBOOK
    • One of my biggest concerns before I deleted my Facebook profile was that it would destroy my social life. After almost a year off the platform, however, I’ve found that this wasn’t the case at all. Facebook’s insistence that it is the heart and soul of communities and friendships is a marketing ploy, not reality. If anything, leaving the social media platform decreased my FOMO.
    • Quitting the social media platform is significantly more of a pain in the ass if you’ve linked other third-party applications to your Facebook profile. Just use your email address and a password manager to log in to these apps instead.
    • Facebook makes it quite difficult to download high-resolution copies of your photos from the site in bulk. There are scripts that will do this, but they take a long time and crash often, so be prepared to spend several hours pulling your photos if you’ve stored a lot of them on Facebook.
    APPLE
    • You can build an incredibly powerful computer for far less than the cost of a Apple desktop or MacBook. Apple products are just luxury items backed by intensive ad campaigns targeted at “creatives.” If you’re really worried about functionality, you can get better PC performance for a fraction of the price by picking your own components and assembling the computer yourself. I promise it’s not nearly as hard as it sounds.
    MICROSOFT
    • Linux is great. It’s also free, which is exactly $139 cheaper than Windows.
    AMAZON
    • It turns out you can get most things you need at IRL stores and everything else is available at speciality websites. Strange, but true! Getting things in two days is nice, but ultimately unnecessary. If you must have Amazon Prime, however, it’s possible to get the service for free for life. Also, Amazon owns the Internet Movie Database—who knew?
    GOOGLE
    • There still isn’t a great replacement for Google Maps, but Here is pretty close.
    • Setting up your own “cloud” service can be done for as little as $50 without needing a ton of technical skill.
    • There are really no good open source alternatives for Google Drive as far as collaborative document editing goes.
    • Ditching Android is hard. Sailfish is pretty much the only remaining independent mobile operating system still in existence, but it’s basically impossible to get onto some phones. Although there is a vibrant community of hackers who are developing their own forked versions of Android, Google is cracking down on these unofficial versions by making it impossible to download Google apps from its app store with unofficial Android OSes. On the other hand, it’s really not difficult to sideload apps onto an unofficial Android version using APK files.
    • DuckDuckGo is a pretty good replacement for Google search and shows that an ad-supported search engine doesn’t require violating users’ privacy.
    MAIN TAKEAWAY

    The important thing is to realize that none of these services are necessary. We may have come to develop a deep reliance on them, but that’s not the same thing. Being an “Apple person” or a “Windows person” is a marketing gimmick, not a personality trait. Amazon is just a version of Walmart that collaborates with cops. Your community existed before Facebook. Google wasn’t always a verb. We have the ability to change these companies by the way we interact with them—but only if we want to.

    Want a more in-depth account of quitting the Big Five? Check out: How I Quit Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Google, and Microsoft

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 10:45:02 De: Motherboard RSS feed for https://motherboard.vice.com Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  107. Facebook bug let apps access unposted photos for millions of users

    Facebook has disclosed yet another privacy flub. This time around, it says a bug in the Photo API led to third-party apps being able to access not only timeline photos (which users had permitted them to do), but Stories, Marketplace images and photos...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 10:39:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  108. A guide to the best eco-friendly holiday gifts for children

    While it’s obvious that we want the children in our lives to have only the most natural, clean, organic clothes and toys, it’s also important to our planet that we introduce sustainable goods from the start. As children grow up with eco-friendly items at their side, they will naturally grow up to respect the Earth, seeking out these types of green products for the rest of their lives. To get them started on the right foot, here are some of our favorite sustainable gifts for kids and babies. Veggie...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 10:30:08 De: Inhabitat Green design & innovation for a better world Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  109. Imax is Shutting Down Its VR Business, Closing Remaining Three VR Centers in Q1

    Imax is making its exit from virtual reality (VR) official: The company notified shareholders with a SEC filing this week that it will close down its remaining three VR centers, and write off "certain VR content investments." From a report: A company spokesperson confirmed the planned closures and shared the following statement with Variety: "With the launch of the IMAX VR centre pilot program our intention was to test a variety of different concepts and locations to determine which approaches work well. After a trial period with VR centres in multiplexes, we have decided to conclude the IMAX VR centre pilot program and close the remaining three locations in Q1 2019." The company previously closed four of its seven VR centers, including most recently its sole European outpost in Manchester. Imax launched Imax VR in early 2017 with a flagship location adjacent to the Grove mall in Los Angeles. At the time, the expansion into VR was billed as an experiment, and a way for Imax to determine whether VR could be the next big thing for the company. [...] Imax also set up a $50 million VR content fund, and got CAA, China Media Capital, and the Raine Group to co-produce VR experiences. Further reading: The virtual reality dream is dying.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 10:20:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  110. 15 Findings in PornHub's Massive Data Dump That We're Still Processing TBH

    Look, everybody loves a good pornography fact. Awkward first date? Low-energy house party? Stuffy high school reunion? All it takes is just one particularly off-the-wall piece of porno trivia to get! The! Party! Going! Trust us. If you’re in need of your own fun fact, here are the 15 findings from Pornhub’s massive data dump that we’re still processing TBH.

    Earlier this week, Pornhub released its sixth-annual Year in Review, a blindingly extensive data summation culled, in part, from Pornhub’s Insights blog. All the information you’d ever need about how people are getting off, and where, and why, and when.

    Read More... 15 Findings in PornHub's Massive Data Dump That We're Still Processing TBH

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 10:12:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  111. Apple says iOS update will avoid Qualcomm patents, China iPhone ban

    Enlarge / iPhones are seen at an Apple Store in Tianjin, China. (credit: Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images)

    Apple's patent battle with Qualcomm in China has intensified this week, with Qualcomm seeking a broader ban and Apple claiming it has a workaround to avoid Qualcomm's patents.

    On Monday, Qualcomm announced that a Chinese court had banned the sale of most iPhone models. However, Apple's newest models, the iPhone XS and XR, were not covered by the ban because they had not yet been introduced when Qualcomm filed its lawsuit late last year.

    Qualcomm remedied that oversight this week, asking the same Chinese court to ban sales of the XS and XR.

    Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 10:03:01 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  112. Forget your deepest, darkest secrets, smart speakers will soon listen for sniffles and farts too

    All the better to sell you stuff

    Smart speakers will listen for your farts, yawns and sneezes and analyse it to sell you stuff, a British AI company hopes.…

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 10:00:09 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  113. Huge Brain Study Uncovers "Buried" Genetic Networks Linked to Mental Illness

    Enormous genomic analysis yields tantalizing insights into mechanisms behind conditions such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 10:00:00 De: Scientific American Science news and technology updates from Scientific American Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  114. The Paris ‘Yellow Vest’ Protests Show the Flaws of Capitalism

    Over the past several weeks, grassroots protests have been sweeping through France, resulting in the worst rioting the country has seen in decades and more than 1,700 arrests.

    The Yellow Vest protestors (or, the Gilets Jaunes), as they've come to be known, are an essentially decentralized movement, united only by wearing fluorescent yellow vests that French drivers are required to keep in their cars. A Change.org petition helped ignite the demonstrations when it demanded President Emmanuel Macron to lower fuel prices and stop a proposed fuel tax. The fuel tax was designed to help meet the terms of the Paris Climate Accord, from which the US has unofficially withdrawn.

    This inciting incident prompted media outlets to characterize the Yellow Vest demonstrations as “fuel protests,” which suggests that people are taking to the street for sole purpose of demanding lower fuel prices or are generally against “saving the planet.” But it’s not as simple as a fuel protest, and these are not “anti-environment” protests.

    The Yellow Vest protestors are demonstrating against a neoliberal system in which the only way politicians try to help society—by, say, mitigating the effects of climate change—is through taxing the poor. When these taxes get enacted, they do what they’re designed to do: hurt low-income individuals. The ruling class uses these failures as evidence that any tax for a good cause is not worth it.

    But taxing the poor to save the climate is a self-fulfilling prophecy that is destined to fail, because it uses the same neoliberal logic that created global climate change in the first place. The solution is simple: tax the rich, not the poor.

    The characterization of the Yellow Vest movement as being either pro- or anti-environment is inaccurate. On November 23, certain Yellow Vest protestors requested hydrogen alternatives to gasoline and diesel vehicles, as well as better maintenance of public transit in rural areas. Environmentalists have claimed that the Yellow Vests protests are actually about “green piety," or socially and economically just forms of environmental policy.

    Then, certain Yellow Vest protestors conducted a survey released November 28 which explicitly asks the government to end taxes on energy product consumption and carbon use, end initiatives to promote biofuel and electric vehicles, and of course, halt the tax on diesel fuel.

    For this reason, it would be fundamentally incorrect to characterize the protests as a green or environmental protest, or even an anti-environment protest. It’s a fight for survival.

    The list of demands released November 28 includes a reduction on all taxes, an increase for social programs like social security and student financial assistance, the creation of a citizens’ assembly and the suppression of the Senate (a house of indirectly elected French officials), and bolstering the benefits for people with disabilities, among other proposals.

    That’s why protesters weren’t satisfied when President Macron simply put off implementing the fuel tax for six months. It’s also why they weren’t satisfied with an increase in the minimum wage, announced by Macron on Tuesday. The frustration in France runs much deeper than a single economic policy, or a single tax. It’s about material concerns like having enough money to feed your family, pay your rent, and survive.

    Although the Yellow Vest protests aren’t singularly rooted in environmental and ecological policies, there’s a reason why a fuel tax specifically ushered people into the streets.

    The policies designed to combat climate change are designed to weaken long-term, or future, material concerns about climate change—meaning damage from disasters like hurricanes, flooding, water scarcity, and desertification. Weakening any of these disasters will help the world’s most vulnerable, meaning low-income populations and people of color, and future generations. However, these climate policies often come at the cost of immediate material concerns—in other words, the things that affect people’s livelihoods directly and in the present.

    But long-term climate protection doesn’t need to come at a short-term cost. And when it does, people justifiably get angry.

    “Some political scientists have described green parties and environmental movements as post-materialist—they developed to represent people for whom material survival was no longer a dominant concern, such as middle class, university-educated people,” Kimberly Morgan, a professor of political science at George Washington University, told Motherboard in an email. “The yellow vest movement appears to be a movement of people primarily animated by material concerns: by unemployment, stagnant wages, lack of economic opportunities.”

    These material concerns are exacerbated by a global capitalist economy in which the only imaginable way to make changes in a society is to tax the poor and concede to the rich ruling class. According to the protestors, many of these frustrations are embodied by Macron, who has been dubbed “the president of the rich.”

    “It’s really not about the environment or fuel, it’s really about the fact that people don’t like Macron,” Harvey Feigenbaum, a professor of political science at George Washington University, told Motherboard in a phone call. “They see him as arrogant, as not listening to the people, as essentially abusing his mandate.”

    This is a problem with climate negotiations generally: the policies that are supposed to mitigate damage in the present and future and protect the world’s most vulnerable are negotiated by people who are largely immune to the short-term material concerns of living paycheck-to-paycheck, and the long-term material concerns of climate change are purely theoretical to them, given their economic status. That’s why the policies that end up coming into practice don’t consider the urgency and immediacy of the material, life-and-death concerns of the working class. The working class is asked to sacrifice now, and upper classes, meanwhile, are rarely asked to make many material sacrifices at all.

    However, all sides of the American political spectrum have tried to apply the frustrations of the protestors to their own politics. Socialist magazine Jacobin published an endorsement titled “We’re With the Rebels.” Similarly, libertarian magazine Reason published “France’s High Taxes Breed a Populist Revolt, Again,” arguing that if France had implemented low-tax, libertarian policies, the protests wouldn’t have happened.

    But the reductions on taxes and improved social programs demanded by Yellow Vest protestors don’t fall into American notions of “left” or “right”: these proposals are symptoms of the failures of a global capitalist economy.

    “The people who are resistant to climate policies on the right constantly argue that the reasons we can’t do climate policies is it’s gonna cost the economy, and it’s gonna cost families, and it’s gonna cost everyday people,” Matthew Huber, an associate professor of geography at Syracuse University, told Motherboard in a phone call. “So when we propose these policies that have the words ‘taxes’ in them and ‘fees,’ and talk about internalizing costs into the market, we just fall into that right wing trap that argues that that’s exactly what we’re trying to do.”

    For instance, Macron’s proposed fuel tax hikes stand to primarily affect working class rural communities who depend on cars to get to work. Meanwhile, politicians such as Macron don’t have immediate or long-term material concerns. For this reason, the ruling class has the privilege of seeing climate change policies as post-material abstraction. It’s a game, and the only stakes are preserving the assets of the ruling class under the guise of “saving the planet.” (To be clear, we do need to mitigate the effects of climate change. But it is becoming increasingly clear that this will require a complete rethinking of the capitalist economy that has enshrined people liked Macron.)

    Feigenbaum said that Macron’s policies have consistently focused on helping the “free market” to address unemployment problems—but these policies have come at a cost.

    “The orientation of him being towards free market is especially because he got rid of a wealth tax when he first came in, because he saw it has inhibiting investment,” Feigenbaum said, “pissed off a lot of people in France, who began to see him as a president for the rich and not for everybody else. So the fact that he then introduces this oil and gasoline tax, which affects poor and rural people disproportionately, fits with this narrative of a president that’s out of touch and is mainly sympathetic to the problems of the rich.”

    Of course, climate change is not a “post-material” concern, since working class, low-income, and marginalized communities are vulnerable to suffering the material consequences from climate change, and people realize this. A Libération petition signed by over three hundred French social and environmental activists directly calls for a reconstruction of environmental policies in a way that targets and taxes the rich, not working class and low-income communities.

    “More broadly, the neoliberal policies implemented [are] at stake,” a translated version of the petition reads. “At a time when the global warming is urgent, this movement also emphasizes the link between the social and environmental issues: the biggest polluters are free from any effort, the main causes of global warming are not dealt with, the breakdown of public services and local shops and urban sprawl continues, alternatives to public transport are not developed.”

    So, how exactly, do we move away from a neoliberal approach to climate policies? After all, according to a recent IPCC report, we have about 12 years to fundamentally restructure the way we produce energy and consume resources if we have any hope of avoiding the very worst consequences of climate change. According to Huber, the solution is largely to just tax the people who actually have money to fund public resources—or, as he put it, “we should not tax molecules, we should tax the rich.”

    “By making it about taxing the rich rather than taxing everybody that uses carbon, which is essentially everyone, you are able to harness a much more popular and populist economic platform that’s based not on taxing people but on delivering things that people need—like jobs, like cheaper and more reliable electricity and energy,” Huber told Motherboard. “A real leftist climate platform would be about transforming those systems that not only green the environment and lessen emissions, but also improve people’s access to things that they need, and improve their material conditions of access.”

    It is possible to make climate policies that protect the livelihoods of working class and low-income populations, both on a short-term and long-term basis. But it doesn’t seem like the French government is considering taxing the rich in order to make this happen.

    The French government has urged Yellow Vests protestors to stop protesting in the wake of a recent terror attack, but the demonstrations are likely to continue. And similar policies that harm the working class and leave the rich relatively untouched are likely to be similarly rejected—in France and around the world.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 10:00:00 De: Motherboard RSS feed for https://motherboard.vice.com Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  115. The Renewable Energy Company You Should Know About

    Despite the interest in renewable energy sources and how to leverage them to practice more eco-responsibility, it’s actually difficult for the average consumer to find affordable ways to use clean energy. If you’re a homeowner, it can be quite costly to set up solar panels — in fact, only 8% of Americans can. It’s either too expensive, or you might live in a multi-tenant home where you need to abide by HOA regulations (meaning you can’t just put a solar panel anywhere you want). Arcadia Power is helping answer those concerns while still meeting the desire for cleaner power sources — and they’re giving normal consumers options for cheaper energy plans, that also save you money in the long run.

    Read More... The Renewable Energy Company You Should Know About

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 10:00:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  116. Big Telecom Wants To Tax Netflix To Pay For Broadband Upgrades ISPs Refuse To Deploy Themselves

    Last year, FCC boss Ajit Pai repeatedly hyped the creation of a new "Broadband Deployment Advisory Council" (BDAC) purportedly tasked with coming up with creative solutions to the nation's broadband problem(s). Unfortunately, reports just as quickly began to circulate that this panel was little more than a who's who of entrenched telecom operators with a vested interest in protecting the status quo. The panel has yet to really offer up a meaningful proposal, but it has been rocked by several resignations due to cronyism, and at least one member who was arrested for fraud.

    As the FCC looks to expand the council's charter for another few years, the panel itself has been pushing a plan that pretty clearly highlights the cronyism intentionally inherent in its design. More specifically, the panel has been pushing the FCC to adopt a new system that urges states to tax Netflix and Google to fund rural broadband deployment:

    "A Federal Communications Commission advisory committee has proposed a new tax on Netflix, Google, Facebook, and many other businesses that require Internet access to operate. If adopted by states, the recommended tax would apply to subscription-based retail services that require Internet access, such as Netflix, and to advertising-supported services that use the Internet, such as Google and Facebook. The tax would also apply to any small- or medium-sized business that charges subscription fees for online services or uses online advertising."

    To be clear, this is extremely unlikely to come to pass, even in the most myopic of states. Still, if you're playing along at home, this is just an extension of a multi-decade effort by ISPs to force somebody else to pay for network upgrades they refuse to fund, despite having received countless billions to accomplish this goal. In fact this push to have content companies pay for ISP network upgrades is really what began the net neutrality fight back in 2003 or so, when former AT&T CEO Ed Whitacre proclaimed that Google should pay him an additional troll toll just to access his network. You know, just because.

    This mantra was long rooted in telecom envy of Silicon Valley online ad revenues, and a belief by telecom executives that they're somehow "owed" a cut of those revenues. Over time it evolved into endless claims by telecom sector allies, think tankers, and other cronies that companies like Google and Netflix were somehow getting a "free ride" on incumbent ISP networks, despite having invested billions into their own global transit and network operations. Over time it became a global telecom executive mantra of sorts, even if it never made coherent sense.

    People forget, but it's this telecom industry attempt to "double dip" that truly launched the modern net neutrality debate just about fifteen years ago. That point has gotten lost as ISP efforts to extract unearned rents have gotten more elaborate over the years, but at its heart the fight has always been about monopoly ISPs trying to offload network construction and operation costs off to somebody else, while already earning fat revenues thanks to limited competition.

    Of course AT&T, who generally drives most dubious DC telecom policy moves and would reap the lion's share of said tax, had originally tried to insist that the panel's recommendations (and the proposed tax) should apply to pretty much all traffic that touches the internet:

    "An AT&T executive who is on the FCC advisory committee argued that the recommended tax should apply even more broadly, to any business that benefits financially from broadband access in any way. The committee ultimately adopted a slightly more narrow recommendation that would apply the tax to subscription services and advertising-supported services only."

    The real problem here (or one of many) is that companies like AT&T and Verizon were already given billions upon billions in taxpayer dollars to fund these upgrades years ago. American history is filled with examples of these companies getting massive tax cuts or subsidies to deploy fiber, then using their lobbying prowess to wiggle out from under the obligations after the fact. Had the government ever conducted any real audit, you'd likely find American taxpayers have paid to upgrade the country with fiber several times over, yet still somehow often only have access to pricey, sluggish DSL.

    That, nearly two decades later, AT&T's still running a lame variation of the same ploy is equal parts frightening and sad, but seems to be par for the course for a country that refuses to learn from history, and an FCC that has made it abundantly clear it's a glorified rubber stamp for lumbering natural monopolies and their very worst instincts.



    Permalink | Comments | Email This Story

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 09:46:21 De: Techdirt Easily digestible tech news... Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  117. WordPress Plugs Bug that Led to Google Indexing Some User Passwords

    A week after releasing v5.0 major update, WordPress has pushed the first security patch for its popular CMS service. ZDNet: Released hours ago, WordPress version 5.0.1 fixes seven security vulnerabilities (some of which allow site takeover) but also plugs a pretty serious privacy leak. The latter was found by the authors of the popular Yoast SEO plugin, who discovered that in some cases the activation screen for new users could end up being indexed by Google. With specially crafted Google searches, an attacker could find these pages and collect users' email addresses, and in some rare cases, default-generated passwords. This leak could have catastrophic consequences if the user has an admin role or if the user didn't change his default password, as is regularly advised.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 09:40:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  118. Protein involved in nematode stress response identified

    When humans experience stress, their inner turmoil may not be apparent to an outside observer. But many animals deal with stressful circumstances -- overcrowded conditions, not enough food -- by completely remodeling their bodies. These stress-induced forms, whether they offer a protective covering or more camouflaged coloration, can better withstand the challenge and help the animal survive until conditions improve.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 09:38:43 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  119. Prostate cancer: New computer model enables researchers to predict course of disease

    How does a normal cell turn into a deadly cancer? Seeking an answer to this Question researchers examined the tumor genomes of nearly 300 prostate cancer patients. Their findings describe the ways in which changes in the prostate cells' genetic information pave the way for cancer development. Using a newly developed computer model, it is now possible to predict the course of the disease in individual patients.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 09:38:34 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  120. A role for microRNAs in social behavior

    Researchers have uncovered a microRNA cluster that regulates synaptic strength and is involved in the control of social behavior in mammals. The researchers presume that their discovery may point to new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of social deficits in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder or schizophrenia.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 09:38:31 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  121. A young star caught forming like a planet

    Astronomers have captured one of the most detailed views of a young star taken to date, and revealed an unexpected companion in orbit around it.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 09:38:27 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  122. A co-worker's rudeness can affect your sleep -- and your partner's

    A new study found workplace incivilities has the potential to not only negatively affect an employee's sleep but their partner's as well.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 09:38:25 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  123. Mammalian keratin genes and adaptation to living on land or sea

    Scientists have performed one of the largest comparative genomic studies to help determine the key molecular and evolutionary origins of mammalian adaptations seen in skin proteins.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 09:38:22 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  124. Ebola-fighting protein discovered in human cells

    Researchers have discovered a human protein that helps fight the Ebola virus and could one day lead to an effective therapy against the deadly disease, according to a new study. The newly discovered ability of the human protein RBBP6 to interfere with Ebola virus replication suggests new ways to fight the infection.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 09:38:17 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  125. Atmospheric aerosol formation from biogenic vapors is strongly affected by air pollutants

    According to a recent study, air pollution not only affects air quality, but it also changes the pathways along which new particles are formed in the atmosphere.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 09:38:14 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  126. Satellite Spies Methane Bubbling up from Arctic Permafrost

    Radar instrument aboard a Japanese probe can spot signs of gas seeping from lakes that form as the ground thaws

    -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 09:30:00 De: Scientific American Science news and technology updates from Scientific American Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  127. Blizzard cancels 'Heroes of the Storm' eSports plans

    Blizzard is putting an end to Heroes of the Storm eSports events amid shifting priorities for the publisher. In a new blog post, it says it's taken the "difficult" step of moving some developers from the free-to-play MOBA title to other projects. Bot...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 09:26:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  128. Spending watchdog points finger at Capita for 1,300 shortfall in British Army rookies

    No one knows if recruitment system will be usable once contract ends in 2022

    The British Army has missed its recruitment targets by between 21 and 45 per cent each year since 2013 because of a botched project with Capita, according to a damning report released today.…

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 09:00:07 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  129. A Corporate-issued Laptop Stolen From a Lenovo Employee in September Contained Unencrypted Payroll Data on APAC Staff

    A corporate-issued laptop lifted from a Lenovo employee in Singapore contained a cornucopia of unencrypted payroll data on staff based in the Asia Pacific region, news outlet The Register reports. From the report: Details of the massive screw-up reached us from Lenovo staffers, who are simply bewildered at the monumental mistake. Lenovo has sent letters of shame to its employees confessing the security snafu. "We are writing to notify you that Lenovo has learned that one of our Singapore employees recently had the work laptop stolen on 10 September 2018," the letter from Lenovo HR and IT Security, dated 21 November, stated. "Unfortunately, this laptop contained payroll information, including employee name, monthly salary amounts and bank account numbers for Asia Pacific employees and was not encrypted." Lenovo employs more than 54,000 staff worldwide, the bulk of whom are in China.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 09:00:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  130. Facebook's Portal video hub gains major news channels and recipes

    Facebook's Portal and Portal+ smart calling devices have only been available for a month, but they're already getting significant updates. The latest version will get news content from ABC and CNN, sports like Monday Night Football from ESPN, AllReci...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 09:00:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
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  131. The Decline of American Peyote

    This story appears in VICE Magazine's Burnout and Escapism Issue. Click HERE to subscribe.

    Peyote has been a part of Dawn Davis’s life for as long as she can remember. The small, mescaline-producing cactus is native to the southwestern United States and northern Mexico, but Davis’s first encounter with the plant was on the Fort Hall Indian Reservation in southeastern Idaho, where her family would store peyote “buttons” in jars tucked away in the kitchen cabinets. The scientific name of the peyote cactus is Lophophora williamsii, but Davis and her family simply call it “medicine.”

    Davis is a member of the Shoshone-Bannock tribes, and she was first brought to a “peyote meeting” as an infant. When she was older she learned these meetings were religious ceremonies of the Native American Church (NAC), a syncretic religion that blends elements of Christianity and American Indian ritual, including the use of peyote as a sacrament. Over the years, Davis noticed the peyote used in the ceremonies wasn’t nearly as abundant as when she was a child. When peyote buttons reach maturity, they can be several inches in diameter, but at many of the ceremonies Davis attended, it wasn’t unusual for the buttons to be the size of a penny.

    Although she didn’t know it at the time, what Davis observed was the beginning of a deep conservation crisis. Over the last few decades, the peyote supply in the US has rapidly declined because of habitat destruction, illegal poaching, and unsustainable harvesting practices. As she began to look into the issue, Davis realized that she had to take action to preserve this disappearing natural resource that is a core element of the largest indigenous religion in the United States.

    Dried peyote buttons. Image: Kelvin Box/VICE

    One of the biggest issues when it comes to peyote conservation is characterizing the extent of the problem. To this end, Davis is developing a program to use satellite remote sensing technologies to map peyote populations in southern Texas. But she said that it will be necessary to push for the DEA to reschedule peyote in order to further the conservation of the natural peyote habitat. Although the Indian Religious Freedom Act was passed in 1978 and amended in 1994 to protect the rights of indigenous people to use peyote for religious purposes, the DEA still considers the cactus to be a Schedule I substance that has “no currently accepted medical use.” This makes it exceedingly hard for individuals to become licensed peyoteros.

    “When you go and apply for this license, it’s not like you can just fill out this application and they get back to you in seven to ten days,” Davis said. “It’s a really deep process. They’re looking at your wife, your kids, your friends. They go into a very, very intense background search.”

    Peyoteros are the link between landowners and peyotists that Davis considers to be vital for conserving peyote. Indeed, their businesses make them some of the strongest advocates for the plant’s conservation. If no new peyoteros receive licenses from the DEA, it will eventually be incumbent upon NAC members to harvest their own peyote, form relationships with landowners, and self-monitor for sustainable harvesting practices. At the same time, now that the Texas Department of Public Safety no longer requires peyoteros to report their peyote sales, it’s nearly impossible for researchers like Davis to accurately assess peyote decline.

    Johnson takes issue with researchers’ characterization of the peyote crisis. He said he hasn’t had any problem meeting the demand of his customers and that researchers coming into the area declaring a conservation problem don’t know the whole picture.

    “People who do research come once or twice a year, and now they’re an expert of how we’re supposed to grow it and how often we should cut it,” Johnson said. “They don’t really know firsthand or have never been in a garden to harvest peyote."

    “I have a big problem with anybody that would say we are short, because now they’re putting themselves in the same category as God, and he’s the one that put it here on earth,” Johnson added. “We can only harvest what God gives us. We have no control over it.”

    At a time when the United States is experiencing what the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies has called a “psychedelic renaissance,” peyote continues to be woefully under studied compared with other entheogens, such as ayahuasca. Davis said this is likely due to the cactus’s association with an organized indigenous religion. For now, the future of peyote gardens in the United States looks bleak, but research by people like Davis shows that it doesn’t have to be.

    “The work I do is bigger than me,” Davis said. “If you take the entire religious aspect out of it, you have a plant that’s in danger. One way or the other it needs protection.”

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 09:00:00 De: Motherboard RSS feed for https://motherboard.vice.com Dernière modification:
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  132. 7 bémols sur les tests génétiques pour révéler le pays de nos ancêtres

    7 bémols sur les tests génétiques pour révéler le pays de nos ancêtres Actualité Salomé Gotreau ven 14/12/2018 - 08:48 19112 Biologie Blogue Détecteur de rumeurs

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 08:48:07 De: Science Presse Detecteur de Rumeurs Dernière modification:
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  133. The Boring Company’s Chicago ‘X Line’ Faces a Tight Deadline

    The Boring Company and the mayor of Chicago are under pressure to get the company’s planned tunnel through the city council as soon as possible, a report this week revealed. Elon Musk’s tunnel-digging venture is making progress on its plan to connect the city airport to downtown, but mayor Rahm Emanuel’s announcement that he won’t seek a third term has started a countdown timer.

    The firm announced the project at a joint press conference with Musk and Emanuel back in June, describing a tunnel that connects O’Hare Airport to Block 37 downtown around 17 miles away, dubbed the “X Line.” Three months after the conference, though, Emanuel announced his plan not to contest the February 2019 election. The new mayor will take office in May 2019, giving the groups a window of five months to get the project cleared with the council, avoiding the prospect of his successor scrapping the tunnel. “It’s a very quick timetable that they’re under, but not impossible,” Rick Harnish, executive director of the Midwest High Speed Rail Association, told the Chicago Tribune.

    Read More... The Boring Company’s Chicago ‘X Line’ Faces a Tight Deadline

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 08:43:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
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  134. Québec : Barrage routier à la sortie de l'autoroute Félix Leclerc

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 08:38:15 De: Zone911 - Tout le Quebec ZONE911 est un média collaboratif de l'actualité et de l'information du domaine de l'urgence au Québec. Pompiers, policiers, paramédics, sécurité et plus. Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  135. Facebook might cut funding for some Watch news shows

    Facebook plans to cut the funding for some news shows on the Watch platform, according to The Information. The social media just renewed four Watch originals and recently brought the tab to desktop and its stripped-down Lite app, signifying that it's...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 08:31:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
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  136. Nearly 100 Lyft drivers sue, complaining of illegally being paid too little

    Enlarge / Sticker for Lyft on the back of a Lyft ride-sharing vehicle in the Silicon Valley town of Santa Clara, California, August 17, 2017. (credit: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images)

    Several dozen Lyft drivers across California have filed a new labor lawsuit against the ride-hailing company, arguing—like many before them—that they are being inadequately paid.

    According to the lawsuit, Abdeljabbar et al. v. Lyft, which was filed in federal court in San Francisco on Wednesday, drivers are being paid “less than $8 per hour.” That’s far less than the California minimum wage of $11 per hour, and even further behind the minimum in some other Golden State cities, which mandate even higher pay.

    A substantial portion of the drivers' lawsuit is based on a May 2018 decision by the California Supreme Court known as Dynamex.

    Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 08:20:08 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
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  137. Ofcom asks networks, ISPs: Hey, wouldn't it be nice if you let customers know the best deal once their contract's up?

    You know, they've paid for the phone a few times over now...

    UK regulator Ofcom wants ISPs and networks to tell customers when they're contract is up and inform them of better deals. The consultation (PDF) was launched today alongside a review of broadband prices.…

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 08:00:09 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
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  138. Don’t buy a 5G smartphone—at least, not for a while

    Enlarge / 5G is here, but that doesn't mean you have to buy into it.

    2019 is going to be the year of 5G—at least, that's what the cellular industry keeps saying. We're going to see the launch of several 5G smartphones from OEMs like Samsung, Motorola, and OnePlus, and carriers will be tripping over themselves to tell you how awesome their new 5G networks are despite coming with a slew of asterisks. I would like to make something up about how ridiculous the 5G hype has gotten, but it's hard to top actual quotes from industry executives, like Verizon's claim that 5G will "dramatically improve our global society." Faster mobile Internet is coming, but should you care about it yet?

    Qualcomm recently had its big 2019 chip announcement, and as the world's biggest provider of smartphone chips, that gives us a good idea of what the upcoming 5G hardware will look like. The industry is doing its best to hype 5G up as The Next Big Thing™, but 5G hardware in 2019 is going to be a decidedly first-generation affair. Early adopters for 5G will have to accept all manner of tradeoffs. And when there might not even be 5G reception in your area, it might be better to just wait the whole thing out for a year or two.

    A 5G mmWave primer: Making use of the spectrum that nobody wanted

    "5G" is a shorthand reference to the next generation of cellular network technology that is launching in 2019. The whole "G" naming scheme started in the 1990s with the launch of GSM, which was called the "second generation"—aka "2G"—of mobile networking technology. GSM upgraded early networks from analog to digital, and those old analog networks were retroactively given the name "1G." Since then, we've gotten new "G" numbers with major coordinated network upgrades about every 10 years. These iterations brought important features like SMS and MMS messages, IP-based networking and mobile Internet, and, of course, more speed.

    Read 33 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 08:00:04 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
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  139. Facebook Doesn't Care About Fixing Fake News Problem On Its Platform

    An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: Journalists working as factcheckers for Facebook have pushed to end a controversial media partnership with the social network, saying the company has ignored their concerns and failed to use their expertise to combat misinformation. Current and former Facebook factcheckers told the Guardian that the tech platform's collaboration with outside reporters has produced minimal results and that they've lost trust in Facebook, which has repeatedly refused to release meaningful data about the impacts of their work. Some said Facebook's hiring of a PR firm that used an antisemitic narrative to discredit critics -- fueling the same kind of propaganda factcheckers regularly debunk -- should be a deal-breaker. Facebook now has more than 40 media partners across the globe, including the Associated Press, PolitiFact and the Weekly Standard, and has said false news on the platform is "trending downward." While some newsroom leaders said the relationship was positive, other partners said the results were unclear and that they had grown increasingly resentful of Facebook. Facebook has said that third-party factchecking is one part of its strategy to fight misinformation, and has claimed that a "false" rating leads an article to be ranked lower in news feed, reducing future views by 80% on average. The company has refused, however, to publicly release any data to support these claims. Facebook said in a statement that it had "heard feedback from our partners that they'd like more data on the impact of their efforts," adding that it has started sending "quarterly reports" with "customized statistics" to partners and would be"looking for more statistics to share externally in early 2019." Facebook declined to share the reports with the Guardian.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 08:00:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  140. Inifniti to unveil its first fully-electric crossover concept in January

    Nissan's Infiniti will mark its 30th birthday next month by unveiling its first all-electric crossover at the place where it all began for the luxury car brand: the North American International Auto Show (NAIAS) in Detroit. The crossover will give th...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 08:00:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
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  141. Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse just became your must-see December film

    Enlarge / Spider... sweatpants? That's just one of the many weird things you'll find in the hilarious, entertaining Into the Spider-Verse. (credit: Sony Pictures Animation)

    I'll keep this glowing review short for two reasons: because I'm on vacation, and because there's not much I need to say to make my point.

    Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse is right up there with Black Panther and Deadpool 2 as one of the best comic book adaptations in theaters this year. What's more, it's easily the best comic-nerd film in years to warmly embrace the kinds of viewers who know their comics canon front and back, all without intimidating the inevitable kid and newbie viewers attracted to this incredibly family-friendly adventure.

    Miles and Peter and Gwen and...

    Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 07:30:01 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  142. Next-gen EV charger adds 62 miles of range in three minutes

    Reducing charge times is a key factor for widespread EV adoption, and BMW and Mercedes just took a new step in that direction. A Porsche EV prototype charged at a record 400 kW rate, gaining 100 km of range in just three minutes, while BMW brought it...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 07:25:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
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  143. Rocket Report: Virgin soars, Falcon Heavy cores on the go, Astra failure

    Enlarge / A Falcon 9 rocket launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base. (credit: Aurich Lawson/SpaceX)

    Welcome to Edition 1.29 of the Rocket Report! This week, we send our hearty congratulations to Virgin Galactic, which reached an important milestone Thursday with its first flight above 80km. We also have some good news on the commercial crew front, with multiple flights looking promising for 2019.

    As always, we welcome reader submissions, and if you don't want to miss an issue, please subscribe using the box below (the form will not appear on AMP-enabled versions of the site). Each report will include information on small-, medium-, and heavy-lift rockets as well as a quick look ahead at the next three launches on the calendar.

    Virgin flies into space (probably). With Mark "Forger" Stucky and C.J Sturckow piloting the vehicle, the VSS Unity vehicle was dropped from its White Knight Two carrier aircraft on Thursday before burning its rocket motor. During that 60-second burn, it reached a velocity of Mach 2.9 and soared to an altitude of 82.68km. These were records for the company, which may begin flying space tourists in 2019.

    Read 26 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 07:15:38 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  144. Update: More Evidence Supports Delaying School Start Times for Sleep Deprived Teens

    Sleep deprivation is a serious health and academic concern for teenagers. A new study adds more support for calls to push back school start times as an effective strategy.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 07:00:37 De: Science-Based Medicine Exploring issues and controversies in the relationship between science and medicine Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 08:17
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  145. Careful with this latest Microsoft release – tug too hard on the threads and it tends to unravel

    The Windows Christmas Jumper Day Update is here!

    Those whacky guys on the Windows team have taken time out from slapping plasters all over Microsoft's flagship OS to slip a special Christmas gift under the tree of the faithful.…

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 07:00:13 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  146. In the Nature–Nurture War, Nature Wins

    Environmental influences are important, too, but they are largely unsystematic, unstable and idiosyncratic

    -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 07:00:00 De: Scientific American Science news and technology updates from Scientific American Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  147. Coal power emissions in the US are even higher than we thought

    The carbon emissions from lugging coal around can be much higher than thought - up to a third as much as is emitted when the stuff is burned

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 07:00:00 De: New Scientist New Scientist - News Dernière modification:
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  148. Protesters Are Slowly Winning Electronics Right-to-Repair Battles in Europe

    On Monday, December 10, protestors gathered outside of the Albert Borschette Conference Centre in Brussels. They’d brought an unhappy refrigerator with them. Inside the building, European Union member states had gathered to vote on changes to the EU’s Eco Design and Energy Label Directives—a set of policies and laws governing the safe manufacture of various appliances.

    Groups such as Schraube locker!? (Screw Loose in English) and the European Environmental Bureau (EEB) had been working towards this moment for months—agitating for EU politicians to take the opportunity to enshrine the right-to-repair in European law. It’s going to be a long fight. Monday was all about refrigerators.

    “They decided, for refrigerators, that spare parts should be available,” Joyce-Ann Syhre, a founding member of Schraube locker!?, told me over Skype. Going forward, manufacturers selling refrigerators in the EU will have to sell consumers the spare parts they need to fix their own machines. They also have to be designed to be repaired with common tools. It’s one small step in a long process. Next week will see another vote all about regulations about lights, and in January they’ll vote on washing machine regulations.

    Schraube locker!? is a German group dedicated to agitating for the right to repair in its home country of Germany. It gathered more than 100,000 signatures on a petition aimed at encouraging German legislators to vote to enshrine the right-to-repair in EU law. Monday’s vote was a small but important victory in the fight right-to-repair legislation in Europe. A fight groups such as Schraube locker!? are pioneering.

    In Europe, the fight for the right-to-repair is new and legislative wins are often two steps forward and one step back. That’s how it was with the refrigerators. “They said the spare parts and information should be mainly there for professional repairers,” Syhre said. “This would mean that all the bottom-up repair initiatives and people at home will still have problems getting information and spare parts.”

    European activists are still optimistic.

    “This vote is an opportunity to open the floodgates towards developing regulations which set the minimum requirement for repair,” Jean-Pierre Schweitzer, Product Policy and Circular Economy Officer for the European Environmental Bureau—a network of people and groups dedicated to fighting for environmental legislation in Europe—told me over Skype. “There’s a greater awareness around issues such as mining of critical materials in conflict zones and electronic waste...but how quickly the changes necessary to right-to-repair are going to happen, I’m not sure.”

    Part of the problem is that Western European countries don’t have a repair culture. Schweitzer told me that, in general, people in the EU buy new devices when the old ones break down. In Eastern Europe, there’s a more robust repair culture that’s been making its way west, but slowly. “We have a similar situation to the US now,” he said. “You have repair cafes that started in Amsterdam, the counterculture of repair is being revived in Western Europe.”

    The vote on changes to the Eco Design laws were the perfect opportunity for the EEB and other groups to make real political changes. “For the first time, within these proposals, they’re including some recommendations about repair...and how to expand the life of these products,” Schweitzer said.

    But industry lobbyists have fought against the provisions and, ahead of the vote, draft legislation for the right-to-repair refrigerators looked like it had been written by a lobbyist. “The provisions that were going to support repair have been massively watered down,” Schweitzer said. The laws seemed to encourage recycling rather than repair. Manufacturers wanted people buy new products instead of repairing their own. “There’s a big corporate opposition to repair in the EU.”

    There’s also ground support among activists to fight the lobbyists. Schraube locker!? is a new organization and its focus is concrete political change. Shyre got interested in the right-to-repair after several of her devices failed once their warranties ended. “You feel very dependent as a consumer but you don’t know what’s going on,” she said. “Is this planned obsolescence?” The EU has laws against against planned obsolescence, but it varies from country to country and its hard to prove a manufacturer created a product that’s designed to fail.

    Shyre met two other like-minded women and decided they wanted to attack the problem of planned obsolescence and secure the right-to-repair. “In Germany there are a lot of organizations working on [the right-to-repair],” she said. But most of those groups work on informing consumers and providing resources to facilitate repairs. Nobody was working to change the laws so the women founded Schraube locker!? to do just that.

    It was a good year for it because the EU had planned to vote on changes to its Eco Design and Energy Label Directives. “This is a political issue,” she said. Then they started their petition, gathered signatures and submitted it to Germany’s Environmental Ministry. The Ministry rejected it. Undeterred, Schraube locker!? tracked the head of the Ministry down at a conference, scheduled a meeting, and got her tacit support of the petition.

    Next, Schraube locker!? enlisted 500 supporters to tweet at Germany’s Economic Ministry demanding it take a position on the right-to-repair. “The Ministry answered one day afterwards,” Shyre said. Berlin’s Economic Ministry told Schraube locker!? it was pro-repair, but only when it made sense. When there were better, more environmentally friendly products available, consumers should purchase those. The politicians, again, encouraged recycling over repair and reuse.

    Despite the pushback, Monday’s vote was still a win. Going forward, refrigerator manufacturers selling the appliances in Europe will have to make them easier to disassemble. Before, the products were often welded shut or glued together, making it hard to replace parts without destroying the appliance. It’s an important first step towards enshrining the right-to-repair in European law, and the first such legislation that will affect the entire EU.

    The coming votes on lighting and washing machines will probably follow a similar course, but none of the laws will go into effect until March 2019 when the European Parliament will formally approve the legislation. Shyre, Schraube locker!?, and the EEB aren’t waiting around to see what happens. The fight for the right-to-repair is starting with refrigerators and washing machines, but the groups have their sights set on consumer electronics like smartphones and laptops. Refrigerators are just the beginning.

    “There will be a bigger right-to-repair campaign next year,” Shrye said. “The EEB, together with iFixit and other organizations are getting ready. There will be more votes after January, further steps at the political level, and they want to run a campaign in parallel...it’s important to create a network between all the actors in the different member states to create pressure on the national governments.”

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 07:00:00 De: Motherboard RSS feed for https://motherboard.vice.com Dernière modification:
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  149. These Incredible Holiday Gift Items Are All Less Than $50

    No two ways about it, folks: We’re knee deep in holiday shopping season and things are getting dire out there. The best TVs are selling out, the stores are overrun with desperate idiots willing to overpay, and everything is so damn expensive.

    So, what are you, an actually smart person with a modest checking account to do? You come to a relatively los-stakes listicle that features ten foolproof gifts for anyone under $50, that’s what.

    To that end, we enlisted the help of Huckberry, our favorite lifestyle site for products, gadgets, and life hacks that would make anyone happy this holiday. here are the 10 best gifts under $50 on the site.

    Read More... These Incredible Holiday Gift Items Are All Less Than $50

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 07:00:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
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  150. How Elon Musk Used ‘Monty Python’ to Give Tesla Model 3 Its Unique Sound

    Would you prefer your Tesla Model 3 to sound “woody” or “tinny”? For Elon Musk, it was imperative that engineers achieved the former rather than the latter. The CEO confirmed on Twitter Thursday that he stopped meetings to play clips from Monty Python’s Flying Circus to communicate the goal when developing the company’s mass market electric vehicle.

    A report published Thursday, describing Musk’s unusual managerial style, claimed that he would regularly interrupt meetings to show people clips from the 1970s British sketch comedy. A particular favorite was a clip from season four, where an upper-class family discusses the merits of “woody” words like “sausage,” “gourd” and “bound,” dismissing words like “antelope” as “a tinny sort of word.” The Wired report claims that Musk “would play it more than once, laughing uproariously each time, as his colleagues waited to return to the issues at hand.” On Twitter, Musk said: “This part is true. I was trying to explain that we don’t want our cars to have a “tinny” sound.”

    Read More... How Elon Musk Used ‘Monty Python’ to Give Tesla Model 3 Its Unique Sound

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 06:57:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
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  151. When will electric airliners make sense?

    Enlarge (credit: NASA)

    Currently, the world is struggling to keep its carbon emissions from rising. But to reach the longer-term goals we have for stabilizing the climate, we're going to have to do far more than roll out some renewable energy. Keeping the earth from warming by 2°C above preindustrial temperatures means a deep decarbonization of our energy use. Which means that we not only have to go fully carbon neutral in generating electricity, but we have to start using those emissions-free electrons to handle our heating and transportation needs.

    For things like cars and busses, that process has already started. But there's one weight-sensitive mode of transportation where batteries may not be able to bail us out: air travel. The relatively low energy density of batteries means that you need a lot of them—plus the weight and space they take up—to power an aircraft. For this reason, many people have decided that we'll need biofuels to power air travel. Yet there are companies that are planning on developing electric passenger aircraft.

    So who's being realistic? To find out, an international team has done an evaluation of whether battery-powered electric aircraft can become viable and when it's possible they'll reach the market.

    Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 06:45:07 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  152. Car tires and brakes spew harmful microplastics

    Wear and tear on car tires, brakes and roads releases harmful microplastics to the air. These end up polluting waterways and harming fragile ecosystems.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 06:45:02 De: Science News for Students Latest Science News for Students Articles Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 08:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  153. The Morning After: Virgin Galactic goes to space

    Hey, good morning! You look fabulous. What'd you do this week? If it didn't involve a historic trip into space then Richard Branson and Virgin Galactic have you beat. Other out-of-reach experiences include hopping behind the wheel of McLaren's 720S...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 06:45:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
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  154. "Spy" Virus Eavesdrops on Bacteria, Then Obliterates Them

    Viruses use bacteria’s chemical language to time their destruction; this might lead to new ways to fight infections 

    -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 06:45:00 De: Scientific American Science news and technology updates from Scientific American Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  155. Top EU Court's Advocate General Says German Link Tax Should Not Be Applied -- But On A Technicality

    As numerous Techdirt posts have explained, there are two really problematic areas with the EU's proposed copyright directive. Article 13, which will require pretty much every major online site to filter uploaded content, and Article 11, the so-called "link tax", more formally known as an "ancillary copyright". It's yet another example of the copyright ratchet -- the fact that laws governing copyright only ever get stronger, in favor of the industry, never in the other direction, in favor of the public. We know for sure that Article 11 will be a disaster because it's already been tried twice -- in Germany and Spain -- and failed both times.

    Despite that fact, the German and Spanish laws are still on the law books in their respective countries. VG Media, the German collective management organization handling copyright on behalf of press publishers and others lost no time in bringing a case against Google. It alleged that the US Internet company had used text excerpts, images and videos from press and media material produced by VG Media's members without paying a fee.

    Alongside the issue of whether Google did indeed infringe on the new law, there is another consideration arising out of some fairly obscure EU legislation. If the new German ancillary copyright law is "a technical regulation specifically aimed at a particular information society service", then it would require prior notification to the European Commission in order to be applicable. The German court considering VG Media's case asked the Court of Justice of the European Union, (CJEU), the EU's top court, to decide whether or not the link tax law is indeed a "technical regulation" of that kind. As is usual for CJEU cases, one of the court's Advocates General has offered a preliminary opinion before the main ruling is handed down (pdf). It concludes:

    the Court should rule that national provisions such as those at issue, which prohibit only commercial operators of search engines and commercial service providers which edit content, but not other users, including commercial users, from making press products or parts thereof (excluding individual words and very short text excerpts) available to the public constitute rules specifically aimed at information society services. Further, national provisions such as those at issue constitute a technical regulation, subject to the notification obligation under that Directive.

    It follows therefore, that in the absence of notification of these national provisions to the [European] Commission, these new German copyright rules cannot be applied by the German courts.

    Although that sounds great, there are two caveats. One is that the CJEU is not obliged to follow the Advocate General's reasoning, although it often does. This means that it is quite likely that the top EU court will rule that Germany's link tax cannot be applied, and thus that Google has not infringed on any snippets produced by VG Media's members. The more important caveat is that even if the CJEU does take that view, it won't affect Article 11, which is EU, not national, legislation, and not finalized yet. So we are still facing the dire prospect of an EU-wide ancillary copyright that not only won't work, but also is something that many publishers don't even want.

    Follow me @glynmoody on Twitter or identi.ca, and +glynmoody on Google+



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    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 06:40:21 De: Techdirt Easily digestible tech news... Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:03
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  156. Prominent artists banned last-minute by Chinese art and tech show

    Several contemporary artists tackling the social implications of technology have been banned by censors from China's upcoming Guangzhou Triennial. One of them was Heather Dewey-Hagborg, whose works often critique biotechnology, notably including por...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 06:35:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
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  157. Quelle couleur voit-on dans le noir total ? L’eigengrau, évidemment

    Vous avez déjà réfléchi sérieusement à la couleur de l’obscurité totale ? Probablement que non, à moins que vous passiez beaucoup de temps avec votre dealer local. Maintenant, vous savez : pour l’œil et le cerveau humain, l’obscurité a une couleur très particulière, et personne n’a trouvé mieux que la langue allemande pour la baptiser : eigengrau (qui signifie « gris intrinsèque » dans la langue de Husserl) ou eigenlicht (« lumière intrinsèque »).

    Le terme apparaît dans des expériences de psychologie datées de 1894 qui visaient à prouver la possibilité de contrôler la forme d'une persistance rétinienne pour faire apparaître des croix. Depuis, l’eigengrau apparaît assez peu dans la littérature scientifique, le consensus lui préférant le terme plus générique de « bruit visuel ». Mais la question que vous vous posez probablement, après être allé vous enfermer dans les chiottes pour vérifier que oui, l’obscurité est bel et bien différente du noir et tournerait autour d’un gris sombre teinté de bleu (sa valeur hexadécimale exacte est #16161D, pour les amateurs de traitement d’image), est celle du « comment ça fonctionne, Jamy ? ».

    Dans la vie de tous les jours, le contraste entre deux couleurs est bien plus important pour notre capacité de spatialisation que leur luminosité intrinsèque (qui ne serait qu’un différentiel de contraste entre un objet et son environnement), raison pour laquelle le ciel nocturne nous apparaît plus foncé que l’eigengrau — les étoiles fournissent le contraste.

    Lorsque notre rétine cesse d’être bombardée de photons, notre cerveau continue néanmoins à recevoir un « potentiel d’action » le long du nerf optique — en d’autres termes, un signal électrique élémentaire, qui colporte les informations de la rétine vers le cerveau avant de libérer, dans les synapses, les neurotransmetteurs en charge de délivrer le message sous forme chimique. Plus qu’une véritable stimulation, il s’agirait plutôt d’un « bruit » résiduel de la rétine, qui se balade le long du nerf optique. Lorsque l’oeil est exposé à l’obscurité pendant 20 minutes, l’eigengrau a même tendance à s’éclaircir, nous apprend l'une des rares études sur le sujet, datée de 1973.

    Et puisque l’oeil n’est pas stimulé par des photons lorsqu’il est placé dans l’obscurité totale et que des expériences ont montré que la fréquence des potentiels d’action (qui conditionne la présence ou non d’eigengrau) est fortement corrélée à la température. Il semblerait que l’eigengrau provienne de l’isomérisation de la rhodopsine, la protéine responsable de notre sensibilité à la lumière, qui réagit habituellement aux… Photons (normal, me direz-vous). Et voilà, c’est à peu près tout. De nos jours, l’eigengrau est surtout un concept qui plaît vachement aux fans de metal et de techno indus, et comment ne pas les comprendre ? Le gris intrinsèque généré par un cerveau privé de photons… Y a-t-il seulement plus dark ?

    Motherboard est aussi sur Facebook, Twitter et Flipboard.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 06:34:15 De: Motherboard French RSS feed for https://motherboard.vice.com Dernière modification:
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  158. Some Nintendo Fans Believe 'No More Heroes' Is the New 'Smash Bros.' DLC

    It’s only been a week since Super Smash Bros. Ultimate arrived on the Nintendo Switch, and fans already know the first of five post-launch downloadable content (DLC) characters. But the imminent return of another cult hit Nintendo franchise, No More Heroes has fans collectively guessing that series could be DLC #2.

    On Wednesday, game director Goichi Suda (also known by his nickname, Suda51) announced on plans for a two-hour December 20 livestream with Japanese gaming publication Famitsu. The stream will feature Suda exploring, Travis Strikes Again: No More Heroes, the newest game in Suda51’s cult No More Heroes series and the first in nine years.

    Read More... Some Nintendo Fans Believe 'No More Heroes' Is the New 'Smash Bros.' DLC

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 06:06:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
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  159. If most punters are unlikely to pay more for 5G, why all the rush?

    5G is like 3G, except this time they mean it

    Analysis 5G is a technical and economical miracle that you cannot help but admire. Soon our streets will be drenched in high-speed connectivity as all kinds of far-out radio boffinry get commercialised, productised, and deployed for something useful. Many billions of pounds of other people's money will be spent here. But the mobile networks are haunted by an awkward economic reality: for all the 5G razzle-dazzle, most punters just won't pay more for it.…

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 06:00:14 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  160. Counting the breaths of wild porpoises reveal their revved-up metabolism

    A new method tracks harbor porpoises’ breathing to collect rare information on the energy needs of the marine mammals.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 06:00:05 De: Science News Daily news, blogs and biweekly magazine articles from Science News. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 18:27
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  161. Counting the breaths of wild porpoises reveals their revved-up metabolism

    A new method tracks harbor porpoises’ breathing to collect rare information on the energy needs of the marine mammals.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 06:00:05 De: Science News Daily news, blogs and biweekly magazine articles from Science News. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 18:27
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  162. 8 new WebAssembly tools you should know

    WebAssembly, aka Wasm, lets you execute code in a browser, support other languages besides JavaScript on the web, and speed up applications. A tools ecosystem is growing around the technology, which is backed by browser makers Apple, Google, Microsoft, and Mozilla.

    To read this article in full, please click here

    (Insider Story)

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 06:00:00 De: Infoworld All Dernière modification:
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  163. Salesforce releases JavaScript-friendly Lightning to bypass Aura’s limits

    With the introduction of Lightning Web Components, Salesforce.com is extending its cloud application development platform to better support JavaScript developers.

    Now in a beta release, Lightning Web Components is a programming model to ease JavaScript coding on the Lightning Platform, which is used to build business capabilities such as credit checks and other reusable processes. The production version is expected in February 2019.

    [ All about low-code development: Why developers shouldn’t just dismiss low-code platforms. | 25 simple tools for building mobile apps fast. | Reviews: OutSystems makes React apps drag-and-drop easy. • Review: Appian aces low-code dev, at a price. | Keep up with hot topics in programming with InfoWorld’s App Dev Report newsletter. ]

    Lightning Web Components supports the ECMAScript 6 (2015) specification, along with some ECMASCript 2016 capabilities, with developers able to use JavaScript features such as classes, modules, and imports. More code is executed on the browser, for faster component performance.

    To read this article in full, please click here

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 06:00:00 De: Infoworld All Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  164. 8 new WebAssembly tools you should know

    WebAssembly, aka Wasm, lets you execute code in a browser, support other languages besides JavaScript on the web, and speed up applications. A tools ecosystem is growing around the technology, which is backed by browser makers Apple, Google, Microsoft, and Mozilla.

    Existing WebAssembly tools inclide Rust-wasm, which provides a WebAssembly interpreter, and Wasmlib, a C# library for reading and writing WebAssembly binary files. But more tools are joining the WebAssembly ecosystem. Here are eight new ones.

    To read this article in full, please click here

    (Insider Story)

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 06:00:00 De: Infoworld News Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  165. Salesforce releases JavaScript-friendly Lightning to bypass Aura’s limits

    With the introduction of Lightning Web Components, Salesforce.com is extending its cloud application development platform to better support JavaScript developers.

    Now in a beta release, Lightning Web Components is a programming model to ease JavaScript coding on the Lightning Platform, which is used to build business capabilities such as credit checks and other reusable processes. The production version is expected in February 2019.

    [ All about low-code development: Why developers shouldn’t just dismiss low-code platforms. | 25 simple tools for building mobile apps fast. | Reviews: OutSystems makes React apps drag-and-drop easy. • Review: Appian aces low-code dev, at a price. | Keep up with hot topics in programming with InfoWorld’s App Dev Report newsletter. ]

    Lightning Web Components supports the ECMAScript 6 (2015) specification, along with some ECMASCript 2016 capabilities, with developers able to use JavaScript features such as classes, modules, and imports. More code is executed on the browser, for faster component performance.

    To read this article in full, please click here

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 06:00:00 De: Infoworld News Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  166. IMAX drops VR, will close its last three locations next year

    Two years ago, IMAX had big plans for VR experiences, with its CEO anticipating 10-minute movie tie-ins that people would pay up to $10 to try at one of its locations. Now that dream is dead, as Variety points out an SEC filing from the company revea...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 05:32:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
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  167. The future is bright, the future is NVMe

    It's time has come

    Promo Technical work on the first spec for Non-Volatile Memory express (NVMe) began in 2009 with a first version released two years later. A decade on, NVMEe’s time has come.…

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 05:15:10 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  168. NASA's Jupiter Mission Juno Reveals Giant Polar Storms

    NASA's Juno mission to the gas giant Jupiter has reached its halfway mark and has revealed new views of cyclones at the poles. The BBC reports: As it orbits the planet every 53 days - Juno performs a science-gathering dive, speeding from pole to pole. Its sensors take measurements of the composition of the planet, in an effort to decipher how the largest world in our Solar System formed. Mapping the magnetic and gravity fields should also expose Jupiter's structure. But images from JunoCam -- a camera that was intended to capture images that could be shared with the public -- has already given us some surprising insights. "When we made our first pass over the poles, we knew we were seeing a territory on Jupiter we had never seen before," said Dr Candice Hansen, from the Planetary Science Institute in Arizona. "What we did not expect was that we would see these orderly polygons of cyclones; huge storms - twice the size of Texas."

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 05:00:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
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  169. Breathing in moon dust could release toxins in astronauts’ lungs

    We already knew that lunar dust is highly abrasive, but now it seems minerals in the dust can easily react with human cells and release large amount of toxins

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 05:00:00 De: New Scientist New Scientist - News Dernière modification:
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  170. A Christmas classic: Cloudera founder asks staff to stay another day

    But y'know, maybe we will terminate positions post-merger if there's a business case

    Cloudera founder Mike Olson has asked staffers to turn down recruiters' advances ahead of the firm's merger with Hortonworks – despite acknowledging there could be layoffs.…

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 04:44:12 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  171. Le luxe parisien se barricade

    En règle générale, les manifs parisiennes se déroulent dans l'est de la capitale en suivant des tracés classiques du type République – Nation ou Bastille – Place d'Italie. Mais depuis trois semaines, les « gilets jaunes » ont décidé d'investir les quartiers chicos de l'ouest parisien histoire de se faire entendre d'un des locataires du coin : Emmanuel Macron, président de la République de son état.

    Outre l'Élysée et l'Arc de Triomphe, l'ouest de Paris regorge aussi de boutiques luxueuses qui n'ont pas très bien vécu la manifestation du samedi 1er décembre. Du coup, pour éviter de refaire leurs vitrines toutes les semaines, les proprios du quartier ont mis en place les grands moyens pour calfeutrer leurs précieux commerces.

    Avant l'Acte V des gilets jaunes, qui a eu lieu samedi dernier, le photographe Baptiste César s'est baladé dans le Triangle d'Or pour immortaliser les devantures de Balmain, Ralph Lauren ou Kenzo, recouvertes de panneaux de bois aggloméré – panneaux qui ont en réalité surtout servi aux manifestants à dresser de belles barricades enflammées.

    Les photos ci-dessous :

    VICE France est aussi sur Twitter, Instagram, Facebook et sur Flipboard.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 04:38:23 De: Vice French RSS feed for https://www.vice.com Dernière modification:
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  172. Respectez-vous, supprimez toutes vos applications

    Lundi 10 décembre, le New York Times a publié une enquête glaçante dans laquelle ses journalistes exploitent une base de données de localisation « anonymes » récoltées par des applications smartphone. Après avoir « dé-anonymisé » ces informations, Jennifer Valentino-DeVries, Natasha Singer, Michael H.Keller et Aaron Krolik ont pu les utiliser pour suivre les déplacement d'individus ordinaires, notamment dans des lieux sensibles comme des centres de planification familiale, leur maison ou leur bureau.

    L'article confirme les vieilles inquiétudes des plus méfiants d'entre nous : les applications smartphone nous traquent. Toutes ces promesses d'anonymisation et de collecte en agrégation uniquement ne valent rien. Nos habitudes personnelles sont si spécifiques, voire si uniques qu'une petite dose d'ingénierie inversée permet de traquer des individus isolés à partir de facteurs d'identification anonymes.

    Le New York Times a accompagné son article d'un guide pour apprendre à limiter le tracking sur certaines applications, une tâche moins ardue sur iOS que sur Android. Tout le monde devrait le faire régulièrement. Pourtant, chez Motherboard, nous pensons que l'essentiel n'est pas de maîtriser nos paramètres de localisation. Ce qu'il nous faut, c'est beaucoup plus d'exigence et de vigilance vis-à-vis des applications que nous installons sur nos téléphones.

    Nos smartphones nous suivent partout. Le truc, c'est qu'ils contiennent tout le nécessaire pour cartographier nos déplacements et transmettre ces informations à des entreprises privées qui s'empressent de les monétiser d'une manière ou d'une autre. Il suffit qu'un smartphone se connecte à une antenne relais pour révéler des informatiques basiques sur la position de son propriétaire. La meilleure façon de protéger sa vie privée serait donc d'opter pour un dumb phone, un iPod Touch ou rien du tout. Malheureusement, difficile de s'en sortir sans smartphone par les temps qui courent. Nous vous proposons donc de passer en revue les spécificités et les promesses des applications qui se sont incrustées dans notre vie.

    Posez-vous une question simple : « Pourquoi cette application existe-t-elle ? »

    Les décisions originelles de Google, Apple et leurs développeurs partenaires concernant les applications continuent de nous hanter après plus d'une décennie. Depuis le début de l'ère des smartphones, sortir des centaines d'euros pour un téléphone nous horrifie moins que mettre 99 centimes dans une application. Comment pouvions-nous savoir que notre vie privée allait payer (cher) pour ces réticences ? Même les applications de lampe-torche ou de coussin péteur ont un coût de développement. La majeure partie des applications « gratuites » ne sont pas altruistes pour un sou : elle sont conçues pour faire de l'argent, bien souvent grâce à la collecte-revente de vos données.

    Au moment d'évaluer vos téléchargements, posez-vous une question simple : « Pourquoi cette application existe-t-elle ? » Existe-t-elle parce qu'elle est payante ou parce qu'elle dépend d'un service payant ? Dans ce cas, elle est sans doute capable de survivre sans collecter et vendre vos données. Au contraire, si c'est une application gratuite qui n'existe que pour attirer le plus grand nombre d'abonnés possible, vous pouvez supposer qu'elle monnaie vos données.

    Le New York Times note qu'une bonne partie des données utilisées dans son enquête provenait d'application météo ou sportives qui collectent et revendent les informations de leurs utilisateurs. De la même manière, des centaines de jeux gratuits, de lampes-torches, d'applications pour podcasts demandent des autorisations dont ils n'ont pas besoin pour monétiser vos données.

    Même des applications qui peuvent sembler à peu près réglo fonctionnent souvent de cette manière. Facebook et ses sbires — Instagram, Messenger, etc — ramassent autant de données que possible, tant en mesurant votre comportement sur l'application qu'en piochant dans votre téléphone (Facebook a fait des pieds et des main pour cacher le fait que son application Android piochait dans l'historique d'appel). L'écosystème Android lui-même est un instrument d'espionnage pour Google. Qui sait ce que nos applications d'information, de podcasts, de réservation diverses et de réseaux sociaux récoltent et vendent ?

    Et le problème s'aggrave. Facebook a transformé Whatsapp, une application jadis profitable grâce à un abonnement annuel d'un pauvre dollar, en service « gratuit » dans l'espoir de gagner plus d'argent grâce à un business model basé sur la publicité.

    La conclusion de tout ça, vous la connaissez sans doute : pour la plupart des applications smartphone, l'élément à monétiser, c'est vous. Opter pour des alternatives payantes et surveiller les autorisations peut permettre de limiter votre exposition mais pas de vous protéger complètement. Pour une libération totale, deux solutions : lâcher votre smartphone ou le nettoyer de fond en comble.

    Il est peut-être temps de supprimer toutes ces applications à fonctionnalité unique. Après tout, elles ne sont que des sites web retaillés pour un smartphone. Accéder à vos données sur un navigateur est moins pratique, mais aussi plus sûr pour vos données personnelles en général. À moins que vous n'optiez pour la résolution la plus efficace : supprimer toutes vos applications pour les remplacer par des alternatives respectueuses de votre vie privée. On sait, ce n'est pas facile. Sur iOS, cela peut même impliquer de se servir des applications constructeur d'Apple. Que préférez-vous ? Accepter la destruction progressive de l'intimité ou continuer à traîner sur Instagram à 2h du matin en semaine ?

    Motherboard est aussi sur Facebook, Twitter et Flipboard.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 04:33:20 De: Motherboard French RSS feed for https://motherboard.vice.com Dernière modification:
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  173. 'Shattered State' is a VR political thriller designed for the Netflix crowd

    Supermassive Games is best known, at least in recent times, for the story-driven horror title Until Dawn, which spawned both a spin-off and a prequel in subsequent years. Other than occasionally flirting with Windows over its nigh decade-long history...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 04:30:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
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  174. So you want to archive our enterprise data? Well, let's see where you fall on Gartner's magic square...

    Surprise, surprise, the execs want someone SaaSy

    Mimecast headed up a crew of the usual suspects – which included Proofpoint and Microsoft – in the leaders' square of the latest Gartner magic quadrant that ranks enterprise information archivers.…

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 04:06:06 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  175. Samsung Galaxy S10 Leaks Reveal Release Date, Price, and Display Details

    Ahead of what could be a lackluster year for iPhones, Samsung appears to be pulling out all the stops.

    The tech giant plans to be an early adopter of high-speed 5G technology, launch the Galaxy F foldable handset, and introduce a notch-eliminating display concept with its Galaxy S10 models.

    Samsung is already the world’s leading smartphone company, but the United States is still largely dominated by Apple. A recent cascade of Galaxy S10 leaks have revealed a device that that might just have what it takes to dethrone the iPhone.

    Anonymous sources “at a major tech retailer” told Gizmodo UK that Samsung is revamping the design for the Galaxy S10. The S9 and S9+ models both saw relatively lower sales numbers following their launch, but the Galaxy S10 variants that have leaked in recent weeks show a phone that’s inventive, sleek, and futuristic.

    Read More... Samsung Galaxy S10 Leaks Reveal Release Date, Price, and Display Details

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 04:00:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
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  176. Anki's cute Vector robot will soon get Alexa integration

    Vector, Anki's tiny Wall-E look-alike, is getting Alexa integration by way of a software update rolling out on December 17th. Company chief Boris Sofman first announced Anki's efforts to add Alexa support to the cute assistant robot's repertoire back...

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 03:38:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
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  177. Pourquoi certains n’aiment pas le petit coup du matin

    Si l’on exclut les quelques fois où j'ai demandé à l’avance à mon compagnon de me réveiller par une pénétration (j'atteins l’orgasme grâce à des aspects psychologiques), mon entrejambe est inerte le matin. Il est comme quelqu’un qui ne se réveille pas, peu importe la force avec laquelle vous le secouez. Mon compagnon et moi avons une relation communicative, saine et équilibrée, et contrairement à mes précédentes relations, on ne profite pas de moi, quelle que soit la manière. Mais récemment, je me suis demandée comment il parvient à être aussi excité tous les matins, alors que je me sens comme un pauvre mollusque au clitoris flasque.

    Les libidos à la force inégale se présentent sous toutes les coutures, de la quantité de sexe qu’on désire jusqu’à la façon dont on désire le pratiquer. J’ai 25 ans, et même si ma libido est bien plus faible qu’il y a cinq ans, je pense que le sexe du matin n’a jamais été mon truc. De l’autre côté, le moment clé, le moment premium pour la jouissance de mes partenaires, semble toujours coïncider avec l’heure du réveil. Récemment, je suis sortie avec deux copines qui ont remarqué qu’elles aussi détestaient faire l’amour le matin. À force de mettre le sujet sur la table, je me suis rendu compte que tout le monde, d’une manière ou d’une autre, a un avis tranché sur la question.

    « Tout le monde a un rythme différent au sein de son corps, des flux de désir différents, des formes d’excitation différentes. Alors que les études montrent que tous les organes génitaux connaissent des érections pendant le sommeil, que ce soit le pénis ou le clitoris, la façon dont les gens réagissent au réveil diffère beaucoup », explique Sinclair Sexsmith, un confrère écrivain et éducateur sexuel. Lui-même sexuellement du matin, Sexsmith apporte une nouvelle perspective. « Certains sont juste du matin et veulent commencer la journée dès qu’ils se réveillent. Certains sont des gens câlins et veulent roupiller une petite heure pour avoir un moment de proximité. Et certains ressentent dans leur corps cette excitation qui les démange et veulent la soulager, même par un petit coup rapide. »

    « Tout comme il y a différentes formes de sécrétions vaginales à travers un mois, cela ne veut pas dire qu’on veut automatiquement faire l’amour parce qu’on remarque qu’on est un peu plus humide tel ou tel jour » – Candice Nicole, psychologue du sexe

    Même si je sais que, quelle que soit notre configuration génitale, nous sommes tous plus semblables que différents, je me demande constamment, en tant qu’éducatrice sexuelle, ce qui fait que nous avons une telle variété dans nos préférences. Y a-t-il une différence physiologique entre les gens qui se réveillent et qui veulent immédiatement faire l’amour, et les gens qui ne veulent pas ?

    J’ai discuté avec le docteur Candice Nicole, une psychologue du sexe qui conseille et qui dirige des équipes de recherche scientifique, et je lui ai demandé d’expliquer pourquoi des conjoints peuvent avoir des libidos matinales aussi radicalement différentes. « Chez une personne sans souci de santé, l’acte de dormir provoque le repos et la remise en état du corps, m’écrit-elle par mail. Le système nerveux parasympathique (SNP), la partie qui nous aide à nous sentir tranquilles et à expérimenter l’excitation sexuelle, est plus propice à être actif pendant le sommeil. Quand on vient juste de se réveiller, il se peut que le SNP soit encore en activité. Cela signifie que le corps est moins stressé et plus ouvert à l’excitation sexuelle, ce qui inclut une circulation optimale des parties génitales. Les taux de testostérone sont également plus importants le matin, et baissent à mesure que la journée avance. »

    Mais cette augmentation n’est pas si simple. Pour les propriétaires de vulves, l’humidité (pas la dureté) est mise en avant comme le signe de l’excitation – et l'humidité n’a pas forcément grand-chose à voir avec l’excitation, constate le docteur Nicole. « Une réponse physiologique ne suggère pas automatiquement un impératif sexuel. Tout comme il y a différentes formes de sécrétions vaginales à travers un mois, cela ne veut pas dire qu’on veut automatiquement faire l’amour parce qu’on remarque qu’on est un peu plus humide tel ou tel jour. L’érection matinale peut être, mais n’est pas toujours un signe d’excitation sexuelle. Pour certains, cela peut même être une nuisance ».

    « Mes érections matinales sont parfois des érections de pipi, m’a confirmé mon compagnon alors que je pensais tout haut à écrire cet article. Il faut faire attention à celles-là. Parfois tu penses que tu bandes mais c’est juste que ton pénis durcit parce que ta vessie est pleine ». J’ai repensé à toutes les fois où ma baise du matin a été interrompue parce qu’en plein milieu, mon partenaire se rendait compte qu’il avait besoin de pisser. Ça a pris beaucoup de sens, et je me suis déjà demandé si j’avais déjà eu une érection du clitoris qui était en fait une simple envie d’uriner.

    « Pour les femmes, peu importe le chronotype, la plupart préfèrent faire l’amour entre 18 heures et minuit » – Candice Nicole

    Si l’on enlève ces rares occasions où je suis déshydratée et où ma vessie n’est pas prête à exploser, je ne peux personnellement pas faire l’amour le matin à moins d’avoir d’abord fait une halte aux toilettes. La vessie se situe le long du canal vaginal sur le côté du ventre, et pour moi, le sexe vaginal avec une vessie pleine est la recette de l’inconfort. Mais il est vrai que j’ai entendu des filles dire qu’elles apprécient la pression que cela exerce contre leur point G – peut-être que c’est valable aussi en partie en faveur de l’excitation matinale.

    Heureusement, le docteur Nicole avait encore quelques pépites scientifiques en réserve afin d’expliquer ce phénomène. Elle cite une étude de 2014 qui analyse comment le genre et le chronotype – les gènes qui déterminent un quart des constantes du sommeil – influencent le moment de la journée où on est le plus excité. « Pour les femmes, peu importe le chronotype, la plupart préfèrent faire l’amour entre 18 heures et minuit, même si les femmes qui ont un chronotype matinal ont une seconde vague d’intérêt sexuel entre 6 heures et 9 heures ».

    J’ai vu plusieurs articles prétendre que « le sexe est inscrit dans les gènes des hommes » le matin, et me suis demandée si cette étude pourrait l’expliquer. « Selon la même étude, les hommes avaient plus de chances d’avoir du désir sexuel le matin (de 6h à midi) peu importe le chronotype, mais le chronotype détermine quelle partie de la matinée », explique le docteur Nicole. « Les hommes avec un chronotype du soir préfèrent faire l’amour de 9h à midi, ce qui peut correspondre à leurs heures naturelles de réveil. Les hommes avec un chronotype matinal ou non-orienté ont plus de chances de préférer faire l’amour dès 6 heures du matin ».

    Cela paraît sensé : les hormones et les cycles du corps varient fortement d’une personne à une autre. Le savoir m’apaise beaucoup par rapport à la façon dont j’ai compromis de nombreuses fois mes excitations paresseuses pour laisser mes partenaires lâcher une goutte à l’intérieur de moi. « C’est le MEILLEUR moyen de commencer la journée », tel est le constat qu’a fait mon compagnon quand j’ai poussé l’enquête de ses besoins matinaux personnels un peu plus loin. « C’est comme faire de l’exercice dès le réveil, on se sent bien, c’est une libération. » J’étais obligée d’être d’accord. C’est une super façon de me faire attaquer la journée, et c’est vrai que j’adore le sentiment du sperme qui s’égoutte lentement de moi tout le long de la journée. (Bien sûr, mon compagnon et moi ne mettons pas de capote. Mais je ne vous encourage pas à renoncer aux préservatifs dans l’intérêt de la sensation.)

    Alors comment quelqu’un comme moi, dont la libido du matin diffère de celle de son compagnon, doit faire pour gérer au mieux les besoins dépareillés ? Le docteur Nicole a une approche très directe : la planification ! « Si le couple choisit de planifier deux expériences sexuelles par semaine, il peut choisir des moments qui correspondent à la libido de chacun », remarque-t-elle. « Ils peuvent assouvir tout besoin sexuel potentiel avec spontanéité le restant de la semaine, mais les deux sessions établissent un compromis équitable ». Pour les personnes endormies le matin comme moi, elle recommande en plus la position de la cuillère car elles permettent aux deux d’être à l’horizontale.

    Sexsmith partage une anecdote qui est survenue lors d’une expérience personnelle afin de me faire plus relativiser, lui aussi. « Je suis plus réveillé le matin - mon corps ralentit le soir et j’ai moins d’énergie. Personnellement je pourrais avoir un rapport sexuel tous les matins, mais ce n’est pas vraiment le cas de mon partenaire. Donc on négocie - je prends note des matins où aucun de nous n’a besoin d’être quelque part et je fais des allusions ou j’en parle ouvertement la nuit d’avant, j’y vais doucement et je me concentre sur des attouchements sensuels et des petites choses qui excitent, plutôt que d’être orienté vers le but de l’orgasme ».

    D’accord ? Ça ne devrait pas être aussi compliqué de capter quand son partenaire est sur la même longueur d’ondes, peu importe notre degré d’assoupissement. « Un simple baiser, une simple caresse, un glissement doit souvent suffire à satisfaire le désir qu’a mon corps », ajoute-t-il. « Si ce n’est pas le cas, et que mon partenaire n’est toujours pas dedans, je me fais jouir tout seul et je peux commencer ma journée ».

    VICE France est aussi sur Twitter, Instagram, Facebook et sur Flipboard.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 03:37:11 De: Vice French RSS feed for https://www.vice.com Dernière modification:
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  178. Time for a cracker joke: What's got one ball and buttons in the wrong place?

    The user in this On Call would prefer we didn't tell...

    On Call How many sleeps 'till Christmas? We don't care, because here at El Reg, we count in On Calls, and we can tell you there are plenty to come, so fret not.…

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 03:29:11 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  179. Razer offers freebies to gamers who descend into its coin mine

    Generate made-up currency in exchange for a different made-up currency

    Gamer hardware specialist Razer is asking customers to turn their graphics cards into cryptocurrency miners in exchange for rewards points.…

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 02:01:07 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  180. Supernovae May Explain Mass Extinctions of Marine Animals During Pliocene Era

    "The Register has an article on the possibility that a supernova or a series of them could explain a mass die-off of marine animals around 2.6 million years ago," writes Slashdot reader KindMind. From the report: A gigantic supernova explosion may have triggered mass extinctions for creatures living in Earth's prehistoric oceans some 2.6 million years ago, according to new research published in Astrobiology. Marine animals like the megalodon [...] suddenly disappeared during the late Pliocene. Around the same time, scientists [...] noticed a peak in the iron-60 isotope in ancient seabeds. "As far back as the mid-1990s, people said, "Hey, look for iron-60. It's a telltale because there's no other way for it to get to Earth but from a supernova.' Because iron-60 is radioactive, if it was formed with the Earth it would be long gone by now. So, it had to have been rained down on us" explained Adrian Melott, lead author of the paper and a physics and astronomy professor at the University of Kansas. The team believes that a supernova located 150 light years away set of a chain of supernovae bursts and covered the Earth in a shroud of deadly cosmic ray radiation. This was amplified, Melott said, because the Solar System is right on the edge of an area of the interstellar medium called the Local Bubble. The Local Bubble extends about 300 light years across and contains the two main clouds of dust and gas: Local Interstellar Cloud and the G-Cloud. As the supernovae ejected cosmic rays, these beams of energetic particles would have repeatedly bounced off the clouds to create a "cosmic-ray bath" that could have lasted 10,000 to 100,000 years. Some of that radiation such as cosmic ray muons would have leaked onto Earth, and over time it could have led to genetic mutations and cancers [that would have caused animals like the megalodon to die off prematurely].

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 02:00:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  181. The Best Wireless Earbuds for an Active Lifestyle Are 49% Off

    The Details:

    • True wireless Bluetooth tech combined with adjustable hook ergonomics makes these ideal for an active lifestyle.
    • Portable case-charger combo gives you 6 additional 3-hour cycles.
    • Custom 8mm driver delivers amazing sound across the spectrum.
    • Special omnidirectional mic keeps background noise to a minimum during calls.
    • Why You Want It: AXUM far surpassed their Indiegogo fundraising goals for good reason: there’s a huge demand on the part of those with an active lifestyle for an option that sounds great and has the ergonomics necessary for strenuous activity. Offering an adjustable hook for optimum fit, a custom driver for fantastic sound, a case-charger combo ala AirPods, and reliable Bluetooth tech, these wireless earbuds are the crème de la crème.

      Read More... The Best Wireless Earbuds for an Active Lifestyle Are 49% Off

      Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 01:00:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Apple will update iPhones in China due to Qualcomm's patent claim

      Now that a Chinese court has granted Qualcomm an injunction against Apple that could block the sales of several older iPhone models (6S through X), Apple says it can fix things with a software update. When the ruling came down Apple said only devices...

      Vendredi, 14 décembre 2018 00:25:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
      Article complet à lire: Ici

Jeudi, décembre 13, 2018

  1. Tumblr is back on the App Store ahead of 'adult content' ban

    Tumblr is back in the App Store. Apple pulled the app from iTunes in November, and it was reportedly due to the presence child exploitation photos on the platform. Tumblr said it found those photos during a routine check and that they slipped through...

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 23:42:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  2. How Big Data Can Help in Disaster Response

    Technology is enabling better management of risks and crises

    -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 23:00:00 De: Scientific American Science news and technology updates from Scientific American Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  3. Deux décès dans un violent accident sur l'autoroute 55 à Bécancour

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 22:30:50 De: Zone911 - Tout le Quebec ZONE911 est un média collaboratif de l'actualité et de l'information du domaine de l'urgence au Québec. Pompiers, policiers, paramédics, sécurité et plus. Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  4. Neurosurgery Could Spread Protein Linked To Alzheimer's, Study Finds

    An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: Surgical instruments used in brain operations should be treated to ensure they are not contaminated with proteins linked to Alzheimer's disease, according to scientists who found evidence that they may be spread by certain medical procedures. The researchers urged doctors to decontaminate neurosurgical tools more thoroughly as a precautionary measure to reduce the potential risk of spreading abnormal proteins known to build up in the brains of Alzheimer's patients. Prof John Collinge, director of the Medical Research Council prion unit at University College London, said that while Alzheimer's disease was not contagious, there was a slim risk that harmful proteins that drive the disease could spread through brain surgery and other rare procedures.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 22:30:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  5. EU General Court Refuses To Allow St. Andrews Links To Trademark 'St. Andrews' For All The Things

    For those of us who have fallen in love with the world's most personally infuriating sport, golf, the name The St. Andrews Links Golf Course is of course quite notable. The famed "Cathedral of Golf" also happens to be located in a town of the same name, St. Andrews in Scotland. St. Andrews is a fairly common term in the naming of locations and famous landmarks. Despite this, The Saint Andrews Links went to the EU's Intellectual Property Office to request it be granted a trademark for "St. Andrews" in roughly every category, including broadly in apparel and sports goods. When that request was denied in 2016 on grounds that location names have high bars to clear to get trademarks and are therefore relatively rarely granted, St. Andrews Links took its case to Luxembourg on appeal.

    There, the EU General Court dismissed the appeal, arguing again that "St. Andrews" is primarily a reference to the town of St. Andrews, not to any provider of the type of goods that St. Andrews Links wanted to hold trademarks for.

    But having had its application to the European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) turned down in 2016, an appeal against the decision has now been dismissed by the EU General Court in Luxembourg.  According to official documents, the appeal board argued “the expression ‘St Andrews’ referred above all to a town known for its golf courses though not particularly for the manufacturing or marketing of clothing, footwear, headgear, games and playthings.”

    The court said EU and UK law generally excludes the registration of geographical names as trade marks “where they designate specified geographical locations which are already famous, or are known for the category of goods or services concerned.”

    In other words, the town itself is also well known and, because the mark applied for consisted of the name of that famous town, St. Andrews Links can't lock up "St. Andrews" for itself in a bunch of categories not directly related to its business. Readers here will likely be nodding along, understanding that this all makes perfect sense. The reason I'm highlighting all of this is because of how frustratingly rare it is for an intellectual property office and appeals court to get this so, so right. Too often, corporate wishes are simply granted, especially when dealing with an entity like St. Andrews Links, which is itself rather famous and is a point of pride for the region.

    It sure would be nice if other IPOs applied the intent of the law this strictly.



    Permalink | Comments | Email This Story

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 22:23:57 De: Techdirt Easily digestible tech news... Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  6. Japan Plans For 100ft Tsunami

    schwit1 shares a report from The Times: It will shake houses and tall buildings, and unleash a 100ft tsunami on one of the most densely populated and industrialized coastlines in the world. It could kill and injure close to a million people. It will almost certainly come in the next few decades. Now, the Japanese government is making plans to evacuate millions of people in anticipation of what could be one of the worst natural disasters in history (Warning: source may be paywalled; alternative source). It is known as the Nankai Trough megaquake. The Japanese government has previously estimated that there is a 70 to 80 percent chance that such an event will take place in the next 30 years and that the earthquake, and subsequent tsunami, could kill 323,000 people and injure 623,000. Unfortunately, the report doesn't outline how the government plans to get people out of harm's way. The city with the most people in the danger zone is Nagoya, Japan's fourth largest city and home to 2.3 million people. "The home of the nation's industry Hamamatsu is also at risk and home to over 800,000 people," reports The Irish Sun.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 21:40:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  7. Microsoft Is Readying a Consumer Microsoft 365 Subscription Bundle

    Microsoft is working on a new "Microsoft 365 Consumer" bundle that "will be the consumer-focused complement to Microsoft's existing Microsoft 365 subscription bundle for business users," reports ZDNet. From the report: A couple of recent Microsoft job postings mention the consumer subscription bundle, which Microsoft has yet to announce publicly. One job posting for a Product Manager for the "M365 Consumer Subscription" notes: "The Subscription Product Marketing team is a new team being created to build and scale the Microsoft 365 Consumer Subscription." The job description says the product manager for this service will help "identify, build, position and market a great new Microsoft 365 Consumer Subscription." The job post notes that the team behind Microsoft 365 Consumer oversees the Windows platform, the Microsoft Surface device portfolio, Office 365 consumer plans, Skype, Cortana, Bing search, as well as the Microsoft Education team. If I were betting on what Microsoft 365 Consumer might include, I'd think some variant of Windows 10, Office 365 Home, Skype, Cortana, Bing, Outlook Mobile, Microsoft To-Do and maybe MSN apps and services could figure into the picture. Maybe this subscription will be tied to Surface devices only? Maybe a monthly leasing fee for Surfaces will be part of the bundle itself?

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 21:03:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  8. Mass email hoax causes closures across the US and Canada

    Enlarge / Police tape. (credit: Tony Webster / Flickr)

    A tsunami of emailed bomb threats is prompting closures at hospitals, schools, public transit agencies, and business across the US and Canada.

    Word of the emails surfaced Thursday morning in tweets such as this one:

    So I actually just got a bomb threat in my work email today ordering me to send the person $20,000 via bitcoin or they will blow up my place of work.... 2018 is wild pic.twitter.com/sn0vVLwe6v

    — Ryan William Grant (@TheeRyanGrant) December 13, 2018

    And this one:

    Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 20:45:54 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  9. Mars InSight lander seen in first images from space

    On Nov. 26, NASA's InSight mission knew the spacecraft touched down within an 81-mile-long (130-kilometer-long) landing ellipse on Mars. Now, the team has pinpointed InSight's exact location using images from HiRISE, a powerful camera onboard another NASA spacecraft, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO).

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 20:43:47 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  10. Amazon's $200 Echo Link is ready with streaming music for your hi-fi

    If you've bought into Amazon's ecosystem of smart home features and you have a high-end audio system, then the Echo Link is intended to bring those worlds together. Announced earlier this year alongside devices like the Echo Sub and Fire TV Recast, i...

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 20:42:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  11. Asian glaciers slowed by ice loss, NASA finds

    Asia's high mountain glaciers are flowing more slowly in response to widespread ice loss, affecting freshwater availability downstream in India, Pakistan and China, a new study finds.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 20:39:46 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  12. Qualcomm Asks China To Ban the iPhone XS and XR

    After securing a win in court earlier this week to ban Apple's older phones, Qualcomm is trying to get the newer iPhones banned too. "According to the Financial Times, Qualcomm has now asked Chinese courts to issue an injunction that bans Apple from selling the iPhone XS, XS Max, and XR within the country due to the same case of possible patent infringement," reports The Verge. From the report: The new filing will escalate the companies' legal conflict in China, where Apple has so far ignored a court-ordered sales ban. Apple claims the ban only applied to phones running iOS 11 and earlier. Since its phones have now been updated to iOS 12, Apple believes they can remain on sale, and so it has continued to sell them. According to the Financial Times, the Chinese court's order doesn't specifically mention any version of Apple's operating system. That doesn't necessarily mean Apple is wrong, but it does mean that there's more to be hashed out.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 20:25:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  13. Sidecar drags itself out the grave, sues Uber for putting it there

    Cab hailing app accuses rival of predatory prices and fake bookings

    An early entrant to the cab-hailing app market, Sidecar, has sued Uber claiming the cab giant used predatory pricing and fake bookings to put its rival out of business.…

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 20:09:30 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  14. A.I. Learns the Unique Human Pain of Getting Out of Bed in the Morning

    Machine learning algorithms are capable of performing millions of computations per second, but many of the simplest of human tasks remain incredibly difficult for our machined counterparts. Take putting on a t-shirt as an example: A team of computer scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology needed to go through hundreds of thousands of trials to develop an A.I. capable of getting an animated character to get dressed.

    This isn’t just a weird flex, the researchers hope that these insights could help lead to the design of assistive robots that can help take care of human beings young and old. Indeed, aging demographics are one of the key drivers of robotics innovation, according to a recent industry report, which notes that the global population over sixty will more than double from 962 million last year to more than 2.1 billion in 2050.

    Read More... A.I. Learns the Unique Human Pain of Getting Out of Bed in the Morning

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 20:00:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  15. US bitcoin bomb threat ransom scam looks like a hoax say FBI, cops

    Extortion scheme gets national attention but not much in the way of funds

    Police departments around the US say they've been apprised of emailed bomb threats seeking payment in cryptocurrency or else explosions will ensue.…

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 19:50:07 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  16. Iranian Phishers Bypass 2fa Protections Offered By Yahoo Mail, Gmail

    An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: A recent phishing campaign targeting U.S. government officials, activists, and journalists is notable for using a technique that allowed the attackers to bypass two-factor authentication protections offered by services such as Gmail and Yahoo Mail, researchers said Thursday. The event underscores the risks of 2fa that relies on one-tap logins or one-time passwords, particularly if the latter are sent in SMS messages to phones. Attackers working on behalf of the Iranian government collected detailed information on targets and used that knowledge to write spear-phishing emails that were tailored to the targets' level of operational security, researchers with security firm Certfa Lab said in a blog post. The emails contained a hidden image that alerted the attackers in real time when targets viewed the messages. When targets entered passwords into a fake Gmail or Yahoo security page, the attackers would almost simultaneously enter the credentials into a real login page. In the event targets' accounts were protected by 2fa, the attackers redirected targets to a new page that requested a one-time password. "In other words, they check victims' usernames and passwords in realtime on their own servers, and even if 2 factor authentication such as text message, authenticator app or one-tap login are enabled they can trick targets and steal that information too," Certfa Lab researchers wrote. "We've seen [it] tried to bypass 2fa for Google Authenticator, but we are not sure they've managed to do such a thing or not," the Certfa representative wrote. "For sure, we know hackers have bypassed 2fa via SMS."

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 19:45:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  17. Apple is quietly killing off Apple Music's Connect social features

    Apple Music Connect appears as though it's on its way out. Apple has started to notify artists that they will no longer have the ability to post content to the social network-style service build into Apple's streaming music platform, according to 9to...

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 19:31:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  18. Astroboffins spy a rare exoplanet evaporating before their eyes

    *Okay so it will be here for another billion years or so but it's shrinking faster than normal

    Somewhere in the Cancer constellation lies a mini-Neptune sized planet that is disappearing at rate faster than ever seen before, according to research published in Astronomy & Astrophysics on Thursday.…

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 19:10:49 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  19. Fitness instructors' comments shape women's body satisfaction

    A new study found that while exercise -- in this case, a 16-minute conditioning class -- generally improved women's mood and body satisfaction, women felt even better if the instructor made motivational comments that focused on strength and health instead of on losing weight or changing the appearance of one's body.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 19:06:29 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  20. Mass spectrometry sheds new light on thallium poisoning cold case

    In 1994, Chinese university student Zhu Ling began experiencing stomach pain, hair loss and partial paralysis. By the time doctors diagnosed Ling with thallium poisoning about four months later, she was in a coma. Two decades after the poisoning, mass spectrometry has been used to analyze several of Ling's hairs collected in 1994 and 1995 and established a timeline of her poisoning.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 19:06:19 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  21. Genetic marker, predictor of early relapse in pediatric ALL uncovered

    Researchers recently discovered that by testing the level of NER (nucleotide excision repair) gene expression, pediatric oncologists can determine the likelihood of early relapse (less than three years) in their acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 19:06:16 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  22. Protein involved in nematode stress response identified

    When humans experience stress, their inner turmoil may not be apparent to an outside observer. But many animals deal with stressful circumstances -- overcrowded conditions, not enough food -- by completely remodeling their bodies. These stress-induced forms, whether they offer a protective covering or more camouflaged coloration, can better withstand the challenge and help the animal survive until conditions improve.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 19:06:13 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  23. To repair DNA damage, plants need good contractors

    Researchers report which genes are turned on or off, and in which order, to orchestrate the cellular processes required to protect and repair the genome in response to DNA damage. The research reveals the genetic framework controlling a complex biological process that has broad implications for understanding how plants in particular, and organisms in general, cope with DNA damage to ensure long-term health and fitness.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 19:06:10 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  24. In older people, type 2 diabetes is associated with a decline in brain function over 5 years, study shows

    New research shows that in older people living in the community, type 2 diabetes is associated with a decline in verbal memory and fluency over five years.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 19:06:08 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  25. Cannabis-based drug in combination with other anti-spasticity

    Oral spray containing two compounds derived from the cannabis plant reduced spasticity compared with placebo in patients already taking anti-spasticity drugs.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 19:06:06 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  26. The Mars InSight Lander Has an Alien, Green Glow When Photographed From Space

    New images of the Mars Insight Lander, which hit the surface of the red planet on November 26, show it glowing bright green. Conspiracy theorists, fans of red-arrow investigations, and those Who Want to Believe shouldn’t get excited just yet, as NASA’s explanation for the images (see below) clears things up.

    But first, here’s how the photos of InSight released today were were shot from space: The HiRISE camera, one of six instruments on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter that circles the planet, captured the InSight Lander, its parachute, and the discarded heat shield that was used when InSight descended made its terrifying seven-minute descent into the Martian atmosphere, the riskiest moments of the mission. (HiRISE stands for “High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment.”)

    Read More... The Mars InSight Lander Has an Alien, Green Glow When Photographed From Space

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 19:06:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  27. Louisiana Adopts Digital Driver's Licenses

    Louisiana is rolling out a new digital driver's license app, called LA Wallet, that will let retailers digitally verify the age of their customers, if required. "According to IEEE Spectrum, Louisiana's Office of Alcohol and Tobacco Control is expected to announce that bars, restaurants, grocery stores and other retails are allowed to accept LA Wallet as proof of age, according to the app's developer, Envoc." From the report: The Baton Rouge-based company launched LA Wallet in June, after two years of collaboration with state officials. But so far only law enforcement officers making routine traffic stops are required to accept the digital driver's license. Next week's announcement would greatly broaden the scope of the app's use. About 71,000 people have downloaded LA Wallet so far, says Calvin Fabre, founder and president of Envoc. The app costs $5.99 in the Google Play and Apple App stores. Users buy it, create an account with some basic information from their physical driver's license, and create a password. That's it. No biometric security -- like iris scans or facial recognition -- required. The app links back to Louisiana's Office of Motor Vehicles database, which completes the digital license with the user's photo and additional information. Any changes to the license, like a suspension or renewal, are updated immediately in the app with a wireless network connection. To present the license -- say, to a cop during a traffic stop -- the driver (hoping his phone battery isn't dead) opens the app with a password, shows the cop the digital license image, and authenticates it by pressing and holding the screen to reveal a security seal. The license can be flipped over to show a scannable bar code on the back. There's also a handy security feature that allows anyone with the LA Wallet app to authenticate another person's Louisiana digital driver's license. It allows the bar patron to select which information she would like to reveal to the bartender -- in this case, simply the fact that she is over 21. That information is displayed on the phone with a photo and embedded QR code. The bartender scans the code with her app, which tells her that the woman seated on the other side of the bar is indeed over 21. None of the customer's personal information, such as her name, birth date, or address, is displayed or stored on the bartender's phone.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 19:03:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  28. Why 'Spider-Verse' Kingpin Is So Different From the Netflix Villain

    Pour one out for Daredevil. Fans of the expiring Marvel/Netflix franchise have the closest thing to a crossover in Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse. In the movie, Wilson Fisk (Liev Schreiber) tries to open up the multiverse, threatening the fabric of reality — and he does it all for a very personal reason.

    Because Into the Spider-Verse, directed by Bob Persichetti, Peter Ramsey, and Rodney Rothman, runs at a breathless hundred miles a minute, it can be a bit hard to grasp what Wilson Fisk was trying to accomplish. But if you know Fisk, be it from the comics or shows like Daredevil, you know that family is one of the most important things to him, and he’ll stop at nothing to protect them.

    Read More... Why 'Spider-Verse' Kingpin Is So Different From the Netflix Villain

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 19:00:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  29. Chargers at Chiefs Predictions: Full Preview of Rivers vs. Mahomes Match-Up

    We are in for a treat tonight. The battle for control of the AFC West rages when the Chargers square up against the Chiefs tonight on Thursday Night Football. At 11-2, Kansas City has already locked up a playoff spot, but at 10-3, the Chargers are just a game behind. Both of these teams come into this game on a hot streak, as the Chiefs rebounded from their Week 11 loss to the Rams by winning two in a row against the Raiders and the Ravens, while the Chargers have won three in a row after their own Week 11 loss to the Broncos.

    Read More... Chargers at Chiefs Predictions: Full Preview of Rivers vs. Mahomes Match-Up

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 19:00:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  30. Why That 'Spider-Verse' Post-Credits Scene Was So Damn Funny

    Even after boundary-pushing Marvel movies like Thor: Ragnarok and Black Panther, it’s not a controversial thing to say that Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse is one of the most unique superhero movies of all time. This movie goes hard even in the post-credits scene, which plays with the Spider-Man multiverse in ways you can’t even begin to fathom.

    For those who are just a little lost after seeing the post-credits scene of Spider-Verse, in theaters December 14, here’s what you actually saw.

    Spoilers for Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse post-credits scene ahead.

    After the Kingpin’s plans to open up the multiverse to replace his dead family were thwarted, Miles Morales accepts his new responsibility as the Spider-Man of his universe. But the uptick in spider activity and convergence of multiple spider heroes encourages one more “Spider-Man” of another dimension to begin recruiting across the multiverse.

    Read More... Why That 'Spider-Verse' Post-Credits Scene Was So Damn Funny

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 18:55:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  31. US elections watchdog says it's OK to spend surplus campaign cash on cybersecurity gear

    Congresscritters now have one less excuse for getting pwned

    The US Federal Election Commission has officially voted to allow members of Congress to use their campaign funds on cybersecurity protection.…

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 18:38:23 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  32. Once and for All, Scientist Determines Best Elite Running Shoe on the Market

    It’s not all marketing: A running shoe actually can make you faster, if it can strike the delicate balance between weight and comfort. Athletic giant Nike believes that it has perfectly cracked that code, though it took a study in Sports Medicine to convince scientists that its product really was the fastest shoe in the world.

    In 2017, Nike released the Zoom VaporFly 4%, a $250 shoe that boasted a specialized foam and somewhat contentious carbon footplate. At the time, Nike claimed that the VaporFly “redefined the feeling of fast,” supporting its claim with a sponsored scientific study showing that it reduced the effort that elite runners exerted by four percent — that’s why it’s called the VaporFly 4.

    Read More... Once and for All, Scientist Determines Best Elite Running Shoe on the Market

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 18:32:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  33. Big-Boned Chickens May Be Humans' Geologic Legacy

    Millions of years from now, the geologic record of the 'Anthropocene' will be littered with plastics, yes, but also chicken bones. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

    -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 18:30:00 De: Scientific American Science news and technology updates from Scientific American Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  34. PREDICTION: Microsoft's xCloud Launches, and It Blows Away PlayStation Now

    Microsoft could do the unthinkable: introduce a Netflix-like game streaming service with minimal lag.

    The company first announced its xCloud game streaming service in October, saying it will see the use of specially-designed server blades packed with Xbox hardware to stream games across the world. Microsoft claims its internal test version requires an internet connection of just 10 megabits per second. Reports suggest the follow up to the Xbox One, “Scarlett,” will offer a $150 version that only supports game streaming, with the heavy lifting done server side. If true, xCloud will play a key role in the next generation.

    Read More... PREDICTION: Microsoft's xCloud Launches, and It Blows Away PlayStation Now

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 18:30:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  35. Google Pledges To Hold Off On Selling Facial Recognition Technology

    In a blog post today, Google detailed how its facial recognition technology will and won't be used. Citing a number of risks associated with the technology, the company vowed to refrain from selling facial recognition products until it can come up with policies that prevent abuse. Engadget reports: "Like many technologies with multiple uses, facial recognition merits careful consideration to ensure its use is aligned with our principles and values, and avoids abuse and harmful outcomes," Google said. "We continue to work with many organizations to identify and address these challenges, and unlike some other companies, Google Cloud has chosen not to offer general-purpose facial recognition APIs before working through important technology and policy questions." "This is a strong first step," the ACLU's Nicole Ozer said in a statement about Google's announcement. "Google today demonstrated that, unlike other companies doubling down on efforts to put dangerous face surveillance technology into the hands of law enforcement and ICE, it has a moral compass and is willing to take action to protect its customers and communities. Google also made clear that all companies must stop ignoring the grave harms these surveillance technologies pose to immigrants and people of color, and to our freedom to live our lives, visit a church, or participate in a protest without being tracked by the government."

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 18:20:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  36. A Daily Dose of Viagra Gave Test Subjects a Valuable Health Benefit

    By sustaining erections where limpness once prevailed, Viagra has vastly improved the sex lives of many people. But the little blue pill, it turns out, may be useful outside the bedroom as well. In March, researchers discovered that the popular erectile dysfunction drug can play a potentially life-saving role in another body part — the colon.

    The scientists, publishing their findings in the journal Cancer Prevention Research, showed that a small daily dose of Viagra played a role in preventing colon cancer, at least in mice.

    This is #15 on Inverse’s 25 Most WTF Science Stories of 2018.

    Using mice engineered to be predisposed to growing colon polyps — abnormal cell clumps that can sometimes become cancerous — the scientists tested whether a small daily dose of Viagra could prevent the development of colon cancer in the mice. Specifically, they were looking at the effect of sildenafil, the active ingredient in Viagra, on the rate of polyp formation. The daily dose, administered through the drinking water of the mice, reduced polyp formation and colon inflammation by 50 percent.

    Read More... A Daily Dose of Viagra Gave Test Subjects a Valuable Health Benefit

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 18:11:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  37. Guillaume Langevin face à la justice en lien avec l’opération Oxyder

    Guillaume Langevin a comparu brièvement aujourd’hui au palais de justice de Val-d’Or. Ce dernier avait été appréhendé plus tôt ce matin en lien avec l’opération Oxyder. 

    https://dixquatre.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/VALDOR-Voieci-larriveee-de-Guillaume-Langevin-au-palais-de-justice-pour-sa.mp4  Retrouvé dans un camp de chasse

    Guillaume Langevin 30 ans a retrouvé vers 5 h 30 jeudi le 13 décembre dans un camp de chasse. Le camp en question se situe dans le secteur de Rapide-Sept du côté de Rouyn-Noranda.

    Arrestation et comparution

    Langevin a été arrêté dans le cadre de l’opération Oxyder. Ce dernier était recherché notamment  pour gangstérisme et trafic de drogues. Il a comparu brièvement cet après-midi. il a fait face à des accusations dont :

    • Trafic de stupéfiants
    • Avoir été associé à une organisation criminelle
    • Possession de deux armes prohibées ( poings américains)
    • Avoir en sa possession alors que cela lui était interdit, des munitions de calibre .12 et de .22

    Guillaume Langevin  demeurera détenu jusqu’à sa prochaine comparution pour son enquête de pro forma qui devrait se faire lundi 17 décembre. De plus, il ne doit en aucun cas communiquer directement ou indirectement avec les autres suspects dans ce dossier.

     

    L’article Guillaume Langevin face à la justice en lien avec l’opération Oxyder est apparu en premier sur DixQuatre.com. Autheur: La rédaction

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 17:50:11 De: 10-04 Blogue Média - Abitibi-Témiscamingue Média en Abitibi-Témiscamingue Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 12:50
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  38. Google opens virtual version of fire-ravaged Brazil museum

    A couple of years before a fire devastated the National Museum of Brazil in Rio de Janeiro in September, Google's Arts and Culture team started working with the museum to digitize the collection. Just a few months after the inferno, Google has reopen...

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 17:49:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  39. How This Forensic Scientist Used Blow Flies to Overturn a Murder Conviction

    On Jan. 2, 2018, Kirstin Blaise Lobato, who was charged and convicted of murder, walked free from a Nevada prison due entirely to forensic entomology.

    Forensic entomologists study the insects colonizing a dead body to estimate how long they have been active on the body and infer time of death. What was so unusual in Lobato’s case was not the presence of insects, but rather the absence of insects on the body.

    See also: Forensic Scientists Use Pigs to Simulate America’s Most Macabre Murders

    Yet neither defense nor prosecution lawyers queried this absence, an oversight that led to Lobato’s 16-year incarceration.

    Read More... How This Forensic Scientist Used Blow Flies to Overturn a Murder Conviction

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 17:49:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  40. Dozens of Bomb Threats Reported Across America In Apparent Bitcoin Ransom Scam

    An anonymous reader quotes a report from Gizmodo: On Wednesday afternoon, a wave of bomb threats were reported at various locations across the United States. On social media, numerous law enforcement departments issued alerts notifying citizens that they're looking into bomb threats targeting businesses, schools, government offices and even private residents. It appears the threats are being sent by email. NBC News said "dozens" of threats had been reported, but the full extent of these threats is not yet clear. A number of news organizations and law enforcement agencies report remarkably similar sounding emails mentioning a bitcoin ransom of $20,000. And some Twitter users have shared emails they've received demanding the cryptocurrency and warning that an explosion would only encourage others to pay up. NBC News quoted the NYPD's Counterterrorism Bureau's brief statement on the investigation: "We are currently monitoring multiple bomb threats that have been sent electronically to various locations throughout the city. These threats are also being reported to other locations nationwide and are not considered credible at this time."

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 17:40:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  41. No Agreement Made On EU Copyright Directive, As Recording Industry Freaks Out About Safe Harbors Too

    Today was the latest set of "Trilogue" negotiations for the EU Copyright Directive, between the EU Council, the EU Commission and the EU Parliament. When the trilogues were first scheduled, this was the final negotiation and the plan was to hammer out a final agreement by today. As we've been reporting lately, however, it still appeared that there was massive disagreement about what should be in Article 13 (in particular). And so, today's meetings ended with no deal in place, and a new trilogue negotiation set for January 14th. As MEP Julia Reda reports, most negotiators are still pushing for mandatory upload filters, so there's still a huge uphill battle ahead -- but the more regulators realize how disastrous such a provision would be for the public, the better.

    Also worrisome, Reda notes that after the Parliament rejected Article 13 back in July, MEP Axel Voss agreed to add an exception for small businesses that helped get the proposal approved in September. Yet, in today's negotiations, he agreed to drop that small business exception, meaning that if you run a small platform that accepts user generated content, you might need to cross the EU off your list of markets should Article 13 pass.

    One other important thing. Earlier this week, we noted that the TV, film and sports legacy companies were complaining that if Article 13 included a basic safe harbor (i.e., rules that say if you do certain things to remove infringing content, you won't be liable), then they no longer wanted it at all -- or wanted it to just be limited to music content. That suggested there might be some separation between the film/TV/sports industries and the music industries. But, no. Right before the trilogues, the legacy recording industries released a similar letter:

    The fundamental elements of a solution to the Value Gap/Transfer of Value remain, as acknowledged by all three institutions in their adopted texts, to clarify that UUC services now defined as Online Content Sharing Service Providers (“OCSSP”) are liable for communication to the public and/or making available to the public when protected works are made available and that they are not eligible for the liability privilege in Article 14 of the E-Commerce Directive as far as copyright is concerned. We continue to believe that only a solution that stays within these principles meaningfully addresses the Value Gap/Transfer of Value. Moreover, licensing needs to be encouraged where the rightsholders are willing to do so but at the same time not be forced upon rightsholders.

    Therefore, proposals that deviate from the adopted positions of the three institutions should be dismissed.

    Unfortunately, for a number of reasons, the text now put forward by the European Commission would need fundamental changes to achieve the Directive’s aim to correct the Value Gap/ Transfer of Value.

    For example, solutions that seek to qualify or mitigate the liability of Online Content Sharing Service Providers should be considered with an abundance of caution to avoid the final proposal leaving rightsholders in a worse position than they are in now. Any “mitigation measures”, should they be offered to OCSSPs, must therefore be clearly formulated and conditional on OCSSPs taking robust action to ensure the unavailability of works or other subject matter on their services.

    This is pretty incredible when you get passed the diplomatic legalese. These music companies are flat out admitting that the entire goal of this bill is to hit internet companies with crippling liability that makes it literally impossible for them to host any user generated content. This isn't -- as they claim -- about a "value gap" (a made up meaningless term). Rather this is the legacy entertainment industry going all in on an attempt to change the internet from a platform for the public, to a locked up platform for gatekeepers. In short, they want to take the internet and turn it into TV. Europe should not let this happen.



    Permalink | Comments | Email This Story

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 17:39:04 De: Techdirt Easily digestible tech news... Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  42. Major utility company Xcel Energy commits to go carbon-free by 2050

    A major utility company is making history. Xcel Energy, Colorado’s largest utility, has pledged to go completely carbon-free by 2050. The company serves eight states, and their new ambitious carbon reduction goal far exceeds their current target of a sixty percent reduction in Colorado by 2026. “Our biggest energy source in a few short years is going to be renewable energy. We’re going to absolutely integrate as much of that as we can into the grid,” said Xcel CEO Ben Fowke. The company...

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 17:30:32 De: Inhabitat Green design & innovation for a better world Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  43. Iranian phishers bypass 2fa protections offered by Yahoo Mail and Gmail

    Enlarge

    A recent phishing campaign targeting US government officials, activists, and journalists is notable for using a technique that allowed the attackers to bypass two-factor authentication protections offered by services such as Gmail and Yahoo Mail, researchers said Thursday. The event underscores the risks of 2fa that relies on one-tap logins or one-time passwords, particularly if the latter are sent in SMS messages to phones.

    Attackers working on behalf of the Iranian government collected detailed information on targets and used that knowledge to write spear-phishing emails that were tailored to the targets’ level of operational security, researchers with security firm Certfa Lab said in a blog post. The emails contained a hidden image that alerted the attackers in real time when targets viewed the messages. When targets entered passwords into a fake Gmail or Yahoo security page, the attackers would almost simultaneously enter the credentials into a real login page. In the event targets’ accounts were protected by 2fa, the attackers redirected targets to a new page that requested a one-time password.

    “In other words, they check victims’ usernames and passwords in realtime on their own servers, and even if 2 factor authentication such as text message, authenticator app or one-tap login are enabled they can trick targets and steal that information too,” Certfa Lab researchers wrote.

    Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 17:20:38 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  44. Sting on Amazon Booksellers Aims To Weed Out Counterfeit Textbooks, But Small Sellers Getting Hurt

    Amazon upended the book industry more than two decades ago by bringing sales onto the web. Now, during the heart of the holiday shopping season, the company is wreaking havoc on used booksellers who have come to rely on Amazon for customers. From a report: In the past two weeks, Amazon has suspended at least 20 used book merchants for allegedly selling one or more counterfeit textbooks. They all received the same generic email from Amazon informing them that their account had been "temporarily deactivated" and reminding them that "the sale of counterfeit products on Amazon is strictly prohibited." [...] The crackdown on textbook sellers stands out at a time when Amazon is dramatically stepping up its broader anti-counterfeiting efforts, suspending third-party sellers across all its popular categories. Unlike most suspensions, which tend to occur after complaints from consumers or from brand owners who are monitoring the site for counterfeits, these booksellers got caught up in what appears to be a coordinated sting operation.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 17:01:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  45. Marvel Was "Surprised" When Netflix Cancelled 'Daredevil,' Cast Member Says

    Netflix’s decision to cancel Daredevil after 3 Seasons didn’t exactly come as a surprise to fans after the rapid cancellation of Luke Cage and Iron Fist, but for the executives at Marvel, the news still came as a shock.

    In a phone interview, Amy Rutberg (Marci Stahl in Daredevil and The Defenders) tells Inverse that the news came as a total surprise to “people high up at Marvel,” pinning the blame on Netflix and adding that filming for Season 4 was expected to begin as early as February 2019.

    “My contacts at Marvel were very surprised,” Rutberg says. “Any of the rumors that it was a Marvel decision are wrong, I think it was purely a Netflix decision. That comes from personal conversations with people high up at Marvel. They were surprised.”

    Read More... Marvel Was "Surprised" When Netflix Cancelled 'Daredevil,' Cast Member Says

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 16:57:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  46. Konami launches free-to-play version of soccer sim 'PES 2019'

    Looking for some football action without forking out full price for FIFA? Konami announced today that it is releasing PES 2019 Lite, a stripped down and free-to-play version of its soccer simulator, for Xbox One, PS4 and PC. The focus of the "Lite" t...

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 16:56:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  47. This 3D Printed Smart Pill Can Live Inside Your Stomach for a Month

    People are very willing to get creative in the name of our health. We wear FitBits that count every single step we take. We snooze next to SleepScore Max sensors that monitor breathing patterns with echolocation. But would you swallow an ingestible, Bluetooth-enabled sensor that can stay in your stomach for weeks at a time and collect data from the depths of your stomach?

    In a study published today in Advanced Materials Technologies, a research team at MIT tells Inverse they have developed a prototype that does just that after two years of development.

    “It makes it easier for patients to be patients,” explains Giovanni Traverso, a senior author of the study.

    Read More... This 3D Printed Smart Pill Can Live Inside Your Stomach for a Month

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 16:56:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  48. Postmates plans rollout of autonomous delivery robots in US

    Wheeled robo-containers called Serve headed first to LA

    Delivery biz Postmates on Tuesday showed off a wheeled robotic box named Serve that should soon start showing up in cities around the US, carrying goods for customers.…

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 16:55:22 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  49. Québec: Un camion renversé dans le secteur d'Estimauville

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 16:38:33 De: Zone911 - Tout le Quebec ZONE911 est un média collaboratif de l'actualité et de l'information du domaine de l'urgence au Québec. Pompiers, policiers, paramédics, sécurité et plus. Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  50. Green-roofed eco resort on Easter Island designed to blend into the landscape

    Related: + Hangaroa eco village & spa Hangaroa eco village & spa,

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 16:30:24 De: Inhabitat Green design & innovation for a better world Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  51. Scientists Used Satellites to Spot Arctic Methane From Space

    A ticking time bomb of Arctic greenhouse gases is now visible from space.

    For the first time, scientists have used satellites to detect methane escaping into the atmosphere from melting permafrost. Data from a Japanese probe revealed an icy landscape transformed by “rising methane bubbles,” Nature reported.

    The project was presented this week at the American Geophysical Union meeting in Washington, DC.

    “It’s really exciting,” Melanie Engram, a remote-sensing scientist at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, told Nature. “We can see roughness in the ice—divots created by methane bubbles.”

    An example of Arctic lakes created by melting permafrost (not from the study). Image: NASA Earth Observatory

    Engram and a team of researchers tapped into radar measurements from Japan’s Advanced Land Observing Satellite. In the last decade, Japan has launched a fleet of satellites designed to monitor changes across Earth’s surface and atmosphere.

    The satellite measured fluctuations in ground height, which allowed the team to see how methane emissions were warping the icy surfaces of Arctic lakes.

    NASA scientists conducted similar research using geospatial data as part of its Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment.

    A major source of Arctic methane is the organic material trapped with permafrost. As that permafrost melts, so too does the organic matter, which can be transformed into methane or carbon dioxide by microbes in the soil.

    Low-oxygen, swampy areas are hotspots for methane, and scientists have documented streams of the gas seeping out of Arctic lakes formed by melting permafrost.

    Engram’s team compared their own data to methane measurements taken on the ground at 48 lakes. Then they extrapolated the results to estimate emissions at 5,000 lakes across Alaska, Nature reported.

    Their preliminary findings suggest that previous measurements have overestimated the amount of methane escaping large Arctic lakes. “Partly because scientists have spent more time studying smaller lakes with relatively high emissions,” Nature wrote.

    At lakes in Alaska’s Barrow Peninsula, for example, the team’s estimates were 84 percent lower than other previous ones.

    The study supports new techniques for detecting methane, but also provides more proof of climate change in the Arctic.

    In other parts of this region, melting permafrost has caused the ground to literally bubble and opened the massive Batagaika crater in northeastern Siberia.

    What’s more, the effect of methane is circuitous. More of it in the atmosphere could accelerate warming, which could in turn create even more permafrost lakes, and so on.

    Methane is considered an extremely potent greenhouse gas, with a short-term warming impact 28 to 36 times more powerful than carbon dioxide. Human activity, such as fossil fuel production and agriculture, are currently responsible for 64 percent of Earth’s methane emissions.

    One recent study looked at the consequences of the release of 50 gigatons of methane under the East Siberian Sea and estimated a cost of $60 trillion to the global economy.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 16:24:26 De: Motherboard RSS feed for https://motherboard.vice.com Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  52. Verizon cuts 10,000 jobs and admits its Yahoo/AOL division is a failure

    Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Spencer Platt)

    Verizon is parting ways with 10,400 employees in "a voluntary separation program," despite the Trump administration providing a tax cut and various deregulatory changes that were supposed to increase investment in jobs and broadband networks. The cuts represent nearly seven percent of Verizon's workforce and were announced along with a $4.6 billion charge related to struggles in Verizon's Yahoo/AOL business division.

    Verizon described the voluntary buyouts as well as ongoing Yahoo/AOL failures in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing on Tuesday. The buyouts affect "US-based management employees" in multiple business segments, not just Yahoo and AOL.

    Here's what Verizon says about its Yahoo/AOL problem:

    Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 16:24:01 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
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  53. Why Time Travel May Actually Be More Possible Than You Think

    The concept of time travel has always captured the imagination of physicists and laypersons alike. But is it really possible? Of course it is. We’re doing it right now, aren’t we? We are all traveling into the future one second at a time.

    But that was not what you were thinking. Can we travel much further into the future? Absolutely. If we could travel close to the speed of light, or in the proximity of a black hole, time would slow down enabling us to travel arbitrarily far into the future. The really interesting question is whether we can travel back into the past.

    Read More... Why Time Travel May Actually Be More Possible Than You Think

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  54. Windows Server 2019 Officially Supports OpenSSH For the First Time

    Microsoft said in 2015 that it would build OpenSSH, a set of utilities that allow clients and servers to connect securely, into Windows, while also making contributions to its development. Neowin: Since then, the company has delivered on that promise in recent releases of Windows 10, being introduced as a feature-on-demand in version 1803. However, Windows Server hadn't received the feature until now, at least not in an officially supported way -- Windows Server version 1709 included it as a pre-release feature. But that's finally changed, as Microsoft this week revealed that Windows Server 2019, which was made available (again) in November, includes OpenSSH as a supported feature.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 16:20:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  55. Apple snags JJ Abrams-produced drama starring Jennifer Garner

    Apple's slate of TV shows continues to grow and the company's latest acquisition is a JJ Abrams-produced limited series starring Jennifer Garner. My Glory Was I Had Such Friends is based on the Amy Silverstein memoir of the same name and it centers o...

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 16:12:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
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  56. Fraudster convicted of online banking thefts using… whatever the hell this thing is

    Ingenious device, or fake bomb from 1980s cop movie?

    Police in London have put away a fraudster who was using a bizarre homemade device to con people out of the contents of their bank accounts.…

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 16:05:13 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  57. Ohio Congressman: We can fund border wall with “WallCoin”

    Enlarge / Rep. Warren Davidson (R-Ohio) wants Americans, Mexicans, or just about anyone else to be able to donate cash to build a wall. And he thinks a "WallCoin" could help do that. (credit: Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images)

    As President Donald Trump threatened to allow a government shutdown if Congress did not provide funding for his proposed wall along the Mexican border, a Republican congressman from Ohio offered up alternative routes to getting the wall built: through Internet crowdfunding or through an initial coin offering.

    During an interview with NPR's Morning Edition on December 12, Rep. Warren Davidson said that he had offered what he referred to as a "modest proposal" in the form of his "Buy a Brick, Build a Wall Act." The bill, which he submitted on November 30, would authorize the Secretary of the Treasury to accept monetary gifts from anyone "on the condition that it be used to plan, design, construct, or maintain a barrier along the international border between the United States and Mexico." The funds would go into an account called the "Border Wall Trust Fund," and a public website would be set up to process donations electronically.

    Rep. Davidson told NPR's Steve Inskeep that the donations could come from anyone and be gathered in a number of ways."You could do it with this sort of, like, crowdfunding site," Davidson explained. "Or you could do it with blockchain—you could have Wall Coins."

    Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 16:03:25 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
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  58. 25 Amazon Items Everyone Is Buying This Year

    It’s easy to get lost searching though Amazon. This is especially true when you are looking at multiple versions of the same product or shopping for gifts. How do you know which robotic vacuum will be able to scoop up all the excess dog hair in your home? Or which pair of headphones your friend would love for Christmas? The list of questions goes on and on. We want to help.

    From a pressure cooker that replaces seven different kitchen appliances and a chic bamboo oil diffuser to an amazing laptop that costs less than $400 and a snug sherpa blanket that’ll keep you warm all winter long, take a look at 25 Amazon items everyone is buying this year. If these products keep flying off shelves, they must be top notch. Just don’t wait too long to take advantage of the deals, these gadgets could sell out at any minute.

    Read More... 25 Amazon Items Everyone Is Buying This Year

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  59. Computer chip vulnerabilities discovered

    A research team has uncovered significant and previously unknown vulnerabilities in high-performance computer chips that could lead to failures in modern electronics.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 15:56:17 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  60. Sewage bacteria lurking in Hudson river sediments, study finds

    A new study shows that fecal bacteria from sewage are living in far greater quantities in near-shore sediments of the Hudson River than in the water itself. The river's pollution levels are generally monitored based on samples of clear water, not sediments, so the findings suggest that people stirring up the bottom while wading, swimming or kayaking may face previously unrecognized health risks.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 15:56:14 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  61. Unpredictable food sources drive some bats to cooperatively search for food

    With the help of novel miniature sensors, biologists have found that bat species foraged socially if their food sources were in unpredictable locations, such as insect swarms or fish schools. In contrast, bats with food sources at fixed locations foraged on their own and did not communicate with one another while foraging or eating.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 15:56:10 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  62. Plants' defense against insects is a bouquet

    Researchers have revealed how the mixture of chemical weapons deployed by plants keeps marauding insects off base better than a one-note defense. This insight goes beyond the ecological convention of studying a single chemical compound a plant is packing and offers new ways to approach agricultural pest management.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 15:56:07 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  63. Genetically modified pigs resist infection with the classical swine fever virus

    Researchers have developed genetically modified pigs that are protected from classical swine fever virus (CSFV), according to a new study.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 15:56:04 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  64. Collagen nanofibrils in mammalian tissues get stronger with exercise

    A recent experimental study on nanoscale collagen fibrils sheds light on reasons why collagen is such a resilient material.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 15:56:01 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  65. Scientists Finally Understand the Relationship Between Insomnia and Depression

    People with insomnia are twice as likely to develop depression, compared to those without insomnia. Chronic insomnia, meanwhile, may increase a person’s risk for depression. In July, scientists discovered why these two states of being appear to be intrinsically connected: They are bonded by a neural link.

    Researchers announced in JAMA Psychiatry that individuals with insomnia and depression experience increased functional activity in regions of the brain associated with short-term memory, a sense of identity, and negative emotions. Functional activity — a term describing when separate parts of the brain are connected by patterns of active neurons — means that there’s a neural basis for the association of depression with poor sleep quality.

    Read More... Scientists Finally Understand the Relationship Between Insomnia and Depression

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  66. The fastest, most secure browser? Microsoft Edge apparently

    Well, in one respect anyway

    Microsoft may have taken the decision to ditch the Edge's browser engine for Google's Chromium too soon.…

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 15:51:34 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  67. ASUS CEO Resigns as Company Shifts Mobile Focus To Power Users

    Earlier today, ASUS announced that long-time CEO Jerry Shen is stepping down ahead of "a comprehensive corporate transformation" -- part of which involving a new co-CEO structure, as well as a major shift in mobile strategy to focus on gamers and power users. From a report: In other words, we'll be seeing more ROG Phones and maybe fewer ZenFones, which is a way to admit defeat in what ASUS chairman Jonney Shih described as a "bloody battlefield" in his interview with Business Next. During his 11 years serving as CEO, Shen oversaw the launch of the PadFone series, Transformer series, ZenBook series and ZenFone series. Prior to that, Shen was also credited as the main creator of the Eee PC, the small machine that kickstarted the netbook race in 2006.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 15:42:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  68. 'Star Trek: Discovery' season two trailer shows plenty of Spock

    Now that Star Trek: Discovery's second season is almost here, CBS All Access has released a full trailer to drum up hype -- and to no one's surprise, the stakes are high this time around. The season will see the Discovery crew partnering with Captai...

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 15:42:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
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  69. In China, a billion cockroaches are leading the fight against food waste

    Warning - This story could make your skin crawl. China’s cities continue to grow at a rapid pace, and it is causing problems with their food waste. The Chinese population is producing so much food waste that the landfills can’t keep up, and this has led to some out-of-the-box thinking - using a billion cockroaches. According to a new Reuters report, a plant outside of the city of Jinan - the capital of the eastern Shandong province - is disposing of the 55 tons of kitchen waste it receives...

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 15:30:41 De: Inhabitat Green design & innovation for a better world Dernière modification:
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  70. Target Fined $7.4 Million for Illegally Throwing E-Waste in the Trash

    The state of California slapped Target with a fine of $7.4 million for breaking state e-waste recycling laws and throwing 2,038 items of hazardous e-waste in the trash between 2012 and 2016, according to the Alameda County District Attorney’s Office.

    Per California’s Electronic Waste Recycling Act of 2003, which created the infrastructure and regulations for recycling e-waste in the state, businesses are required to dispose of hazardous e-waste, which could include laptops and TVs with LCD screens, computers or other devices with fluorescent cathode ray tubes, and miscellaneous electronic equipment like batteries and circuit boards. But according to a press release from the district attorney’s office, those weren’t the only items Target threw in the trash illegally.

    “The waste included items such as electronics, batteries, aerosol cans, compact fluorescent light bulbs, and medical waste including syringes, over-the-counter and prescribed pharmaceuticals, as well as confidential medical information from its customers,” the Alameda County District Attorney’s Office press release states.

    Target earned almost $72 billion in revenue last year, so a $7.4 million settlement won’t bankrupt the company. But it’s worth noting that this isn’t the first time Target has paid a fine for throwing e-waste in the trash. In 2011, Target had to pay a $22.5 million settlement, and agreed to train employees in hazardous waste handling and disposal methods.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 15:30:16 De: Motherboard RSS feed for https://motherboard.vice.com Dernière modification:
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  71. Netflix Is Testing an Instant Replay Feature & Users Are Cranky About It

    Let us set the scene: You’re lying in bed, half-watching that new Netflix movie that your friends keep bugging you to see. Suddenly, the movie music swells. Oh, a romantic moment! Between whats-her-name and that… guy! And then, in the corner of your screen, a pop-up. “Replay that scene?” it asks. If you’re feeling a little, uh, weird about your computer asking if you’d like to re-watch a steamy scene, well, welcome to the future: Netflix has started testing an instant replay feature, and people do not know how to feel.

    As early as Dec. 10, Netflix users began reporting on Twitter and Reddit that while watching several movies, including a couple of Netflix originals, they were prompted after particularly intense, emotional scenes with an option for instant scene-replay. Netflix has since confirmed they’ve begun user testing a replay-scene pop-up notification that appears in the same lower right-hand corner as the “skip intro” option for many TV shows.

    Read More... Netflix Is Testing an Instant Replay Feature & Users Are Cranky About It

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  72. We finally talked to an actual Waymo passenger—here’s what he told us

    Enlarge / Waymo signage is displayed on the open door of a Chrysler Pacifica autonomous vehicle in Chandler, Arizona, on Monday, July 30, 2018. (credit: Caitlin O'Hara/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

    For the last 18 months, Waymo vehicles have been ferrying passengers around the southeast corner of the Phoenix metropolitan area. The company has tightly controlled information about the project by contractually prohibiting passengers from discussing the experience.

    That was supposed to change last week when Waymo officially launched its commercial service, Waymo One. The company said it would lift its nondisclosure requirement for at least some passengers, allowing them to talk to the press about what it's like to be an ordinary passenger in a Waymo car.

    For the last week, reporters like me have been scouring the Internet to find Waymo One customers we can talk to—and coming up empty. Waymo One may have officially launched, but the program was still limited to people who were previously part of Waymo's earlier testing program. And so far none of these people had come forward to talk about the experience publicly.

    Read 32 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 15:29:32 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
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  73. 'Fortnite' Week 2 Snowfall Loading Screen Leads to a Hidden Banner

    Fortnite’s starting to get a little bit more creative with its secret clues in the ongoing Snowfall challenges because Week 2. At the very least, we’re happy the location doesn’t overlap with a specific challenge destination, like it did in Week 1.

    Week 2 in Fortnite: Battle Royale Season 7 kicked off Thursday morning, and for any players that complete all seven of the weekly challenges — including dance offs and piano-playing — they unlocked the secret Snowfall loading screen. That, in turn, offers a clue to either a secret battle star or a hidden banner. This being an even-numbered week, it’s the latter.

    Read More... 'Fortnite' Week 2 Snowfall Loading Screen Leads to a Hidden Banner

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  74. 'Sonic' and other Genesis classics come to Amazon Fire TV

    You won't have to shell out for a mini console to revel in Sega-style nostalgia. The gaming pioneer has released a Sega Classics collection for Fire TV devices that brings 25 of the developer's better-known Genesis games to Amazon's media players. Th...

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 15:09:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
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  75. Apple will spend $1 billion and hire up to 15,000 people for new Austin office

    Enlarge / Apple's existing campus in Austin, Texas. (credit: Apple)

    Earlier this year, Apple announced it would launch a major new campus in the US, its second largest behind the Cupertino headquarters. Now we know where.

    Apple announced this morning that it will spend $1 billion to open a new campus in the southern tech hub of Austin, Texas, and that it will open new offices and add 1,000 new jobs each to San Diego, Seattle, and Culver City, California, which is a municipality in the heart of Los Angeles. Further expansion is also planned in Pittsburgh, New York, Boston, Boulder, and Portland. It also plans to invest $4.5 billion in data centers like those in Nevada, North Carolina, and Arizona this year and next.

    The company has gone to great lengths to position this as part of a narrative about the vast number of people it currently employs and will employ in the future across the United States. Apple hopes this will counter criticisms about its manufacturing operations and partners in China. The industry giant says it is on track to create 20,000 new jobs in the US by 2023. It also plans to spend $30 billion on new facilities by that date. Apple currently employs about 90,000 people in the US.

    Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 15:08:34 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
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  76. FCC Says It Will Finally Investigate Nation's Bullshit Broadband Availability Maps. Maybe.

    For years we've noted how the FCC's broadband availability maps are just comically bad. If you'd like to confirm that take, you can just plug your home address into the agency's $350 million broadband availability map and watch as entire ISPs and speed availability are largely hallucinated. This is a problem that never gets fixed, largely because the nation's entrenched broadband providers (and the politicians paid to love them) have a vested interest in pretending that the US broadband industry isn't just an aggressive hodge-podge of broken monopolies and duopolies nickel-and-diming the hell out of captive customers.

    Senators have been bitching about the maps a little more lately as states vie for FCC Mobility Fund Phase II Auction subsidies, which will dole out $4.5 billion to under-connected states over the next decade. Back in August, Montana Senator Jon Tester went so far as to suggest that said maps "stink" and that somebody should have their "ass kicked" for the terrible data the FCC uses for both subsidies and policy.

    Last Friday the Sisyphean quest to stop our maps from sucking turned an interesting corner, when the FCC announced (pdf) it was finally launching an investigation into whether "one or more" mobile carriers submitted false coverage data to the FCC. The FCC appears to be responding to a complaint (pdf) filed earlier this year by the Rural Wireless Association (RWA), which stated that Verizon was "grossly overstating" the company's 4G LTE broadband coverage in its filings with the FCC.

    FCC boss Ajit Pai likes to talk a lot about how he's "closing the digital divide," despite the fact his policies (like killing net neutrality or weakening the very definition of the word "competition") generally tend to make problems of broadband availability and affordability worse. But the pressure coming from states as they clamor for their chunk of subsidies appears to have finally forced Pai (whose post-FCC political aspirations are fairly obvious) to take action:

    "My top priority is bridging the digital divide and ensuring that Americans have access to digital opportunity regardless of where they live, and the FCC’s Mobility Fund Phase II program can play a key role in extending high-speed Internet access to rural areas across America,” said Chairman Pai. “In order to reach those areas, it’s critical that we know where access is and where it is not. A preliminary review of speed test data submitted through the challenge process suggested significant violations of the Commission’s rules. That’s why I’ve ordered an investigation into these matters. We must ensure that the data is accurate before we can proceed."

    Those concerns were mirrored by Pai's fellow Commissioner Brendan Carr:

    "It is deeply concerning that FCC staff's preliminary analysis of the challenge data shows that one or more major carriers potentially violated the Commission's MF-II mapping rules and submitted incorrect maps. Today's announcement aligns with concerns I shared with Chairman Pai, and I look forward to working with him and our able staff to complete this investigation."

    A big part of the Mobility Fund Phase II subsidy process involves incumbent carriers like Verizon providing accurate broadband availability maps to determine which areas are in most dire need of subsidized help. But because companies like Verizon don't want to both advertise their network shortcomings or help drive funds to would-be competitors, they tend to overstate coverage of both mobile and fixed-line networks. Last August, Verizon denied to Ars Technica that its broadband availability data was inaccurate after the data was called a "sham" by the RWA.

    This rose-colored glasses approach to broadband mapping is decades old, so any surprise you're hearing from government probably isn't all that authentic. As such, any applause should be held until actual action is taken and the companies involved are adequately punished (especially given Verizon used to be Pai's employer). Still, it's great to see Pai and the FCC at least pay some attention to a problem that has plagued the telecom sector for years, allowing it to paint an inaccurate picture of broadband availability and competition, thereby hampering any efforts to actually do something about it.



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    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 15:03:45 De: Techdirt Easily digestible tech news... Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:03
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  77. The Oil Industry's Covert Campaign To Rewrite American Car Emissions Rules

    When the Trump administration laid out a plan this year that would eventually allow cars to emit more pollution, automakers, the obvious winners from the proposal, balked. The changes, they said, went too far even for them. But it turns out that there was a hidden beneficiary of the plan that was pushing for the changes all along: the nation's oil industry. From an investigation by The New York Times: In Congress, on Facebook and in statehouses nationwide, Marathon Petroleum, the country's largest refiner, worked with powerful oil-industry groups and a conservative policy network financed by the billionaire industrialist Charles G. Koch to run a stealth campaign to roll back car emissions standards, a New York Times investigation has found. The campaign's main argument for significantly easing fuel efficiency standards -- that the United States is so awash in oil it no longer needs to worry about energy conservation -- clashed with decades of federal energy and environmental policy. "With oil scarcity no longer a concern," Americans should be given a "choice in vehicles that best fit their needs," read a draft of a letter that Marathon helped to circulate to members of Congress over the summer. Official correspondence later sent to regulators by more than a dozen lawmakers included phrases or sentences from the industry talking points, and the Trump administration's proposed rules incorporate similar logic. The industry had reason to urge the rollback of higher fuel efficiency standards proposed by former President Barack Obama. A quarter of the world's oil is used to power cars, and less-thirsty vehicles mean lower gasoline sales.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 15:01:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
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  78. How Cute, Sensor-Filled Backpacks for Bees Can Help Feed the Planet: Video

    In the latest example of Black Mirror episodes come to life, a group of researchers at the University of Washington are equipping bees with a tiny backpack full of sensors to help farmers grow their crops. In yet another example of roboticists looking to the efficiency of nature for solutions to man-made problems, these cyborg bees could hold the key to improving crop yields to feed a ballooning global population.

    Lead author Vikram Iyer and his colleagues glued a 102 milligram chipboard to the back live bees. The tiny component is made up of a battery, antenna, a tiny processor, temperature and humidity sensors, and components to receive and send radio signals. Iyer tells Inverse that the device would only cost a couple of dollars to make at a large scale and it could give farmers access to the kind of nuanced data current agricultural tech can’t provide.

    Read More... How Cute, Sensor-Filled Backpacks for Bees Can Help Feed the Planet: Video

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  79. Here's How to Compete in a Dance Off in an Abandoned Mansion in 'Fortnite'

    Dancing has officially become a weekly challenge staple in the world of Fortnite. After last week’s forbidden dance locations, now we’re all getting down in a basement dance club located in an abandoned mansion of all places.

    Week 2 for Fortnite: Battle Royale Season 7 began Thursday morning, and along with some festive piano playing, a new challenge has players compete in a dance off at an abandoned mansion.” Conceptually, this one’s pretty similar to May’s “raise the disco ball at Loot Lake” challenge. Players have to go to a specific location and dance on special panels to do a certain thing.

    Read More... Here's How to Compete in a Dance Off in an Abandoned Mansion in 'Fortnite'

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  80. Big data reveals hints of how, when and where mental disorders start

    The first wave of data from the PsychENCODE project holds new clues to how and when psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia emerge.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:49:10 De: Science News Daily news, blogs and biweekly magazine articles from Science News. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 18:27
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  81. Microsoft is putting together a Microsoft 365 subscription for home users

    Enlarge (credit: Patty's Photos / Flickr)

    Microsoft has had success in the enterprise space with its Microsoft 365 subscription, which bundles Office 365, Windows 10, and remote management with Enterprise Mobility + Security. Its home-oriented Office 365 subscriptions have also been growing steadily, with 32.5 million subscriptions as of the company's most recent financial reports. And now Microsoft is planning to bring these things together with a Microsoft 365 subscription aimed at non-corporate users, reports Mary Jo Foley.

    Microsoft 365 Consumer would be a subscription bundle with a consumer focus. Foley notes that there have been job advertisements alluding to such a product, and the move would seem to be consistent with the company's plan to re-engage with consumers. At its Inspire partner event earlier this year, the company said that it wanted to target "professional consumers" by offering software and services to enhance their "Modern Life and Devices." The meaning of this is not entirely clear, but it seems to mean that the company will continue to make its services work better wherever you use them (greater support for iOS and Android phones). Syncing and replication will ensure that your work and current context moves seamlessly between devices.

    Less clear is what a Microsoft 365 Consumer bundle would actually include. Office 365 is an obvious component; it's already being sold to consumers, and it remains the heart of Microsoft's productivity vision. But beyond that? Windows 10 is, for home users, functionally free already. There have long been fears/rumors/speculation that Microsoft will move to a monthly Windows subscription model for consumers, but there are no signs that this is happening. Given the way Windows 10 has been positioned—the "last version" of Windows that will be updated and upgraded indefinitely—it's hard to imagine it ever happening.

    Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:45:44 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
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  82. People Living on Mountains Face Avalanche of Climate Risks

    As higher elevations warm, melting glaciers and disappearing snow will create major challenges

    -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:45:00 De: Scientific American Science news and technology updates from Scientific American Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
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  83. Qualcomm wants China to ban the iPhone XS and XR

    As part of an ongoing patent dispute, chipmaker Qualcomm is asking Chinese courts to ban sales of Apple's iPhone XS, XS Max and XR within the country, according to the Financial Times. The request comes just days after the company won an injunction t...

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:30:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
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  84. Meet the Students Trying to Make the Dream of a Hyperloop a Reality

    This video was created with GEICO.

    It’s the 21st century and we’re still traveling like it’s the 20th. Cars and trains shaped the modern world, but we can do better. The hyperloop, in particular, could connect the world and allow people to make trips between major cities in a fraction of the time.

    EPFLoop, an international team of 25 students working out of the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland, are trying to make that dream a reality. The group is building hyperloop pods for SpaceX’s annual competition. This year, they took third place, but they’re already working on 2019.

    “The hyperloop combines all of the advantages of our current modes of transport that we know today—it’s on demand, it’s direct, it’s energy efficient, it’s emission free, it would shrink distances between cities, between countries, between continents, in a way that has never been done before,” Karine Chammas, business lead for EPFLoop told Motherboard.

    The hyperloop would be a train-style transportation system that connects distances through a series of pressurized tubes. The pods in those tubes would travel along a magnetized track that hurls objects along at high speeds. If it works, passengers could travel from Los Angeles to San Francisco in 40 minutes. It’s the speed of flight for the cost of trucking. If the loops get built, it could revolutionize travel.

    “Imagine a world in the future that is smaller, greener, and connects people in a way that we’ve never witnessed before,” Chammas said.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:30:00 De: Motherboard RSS feed for https://motherboard.vice.com Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  85. Data-Wiping Malware Shamoon Destroys Files At Italian Oil and Gas Company; Other Energy Companies Operating in the Middle East Warned of Cyber Attacks

    An anonymous reader writes: A new variant of the Shamoon malware was discovered on the network of an Italian and UAE oil and gas companies. While the damage at the UAE firm is currently unknown, the malware has been confirmed to have destroyed files on about ten percent of the Italian company's PC fleet. Shamoon is one of the most dangerous strains of malware known to date. It was first deployed in two separate incidents that targeted the infrastructure of Saudi Aramco, Saudi Arabia's largest oil producer, in 2012 and 2016. During those incidents, the malware wiped files and replaced them with propaganda images (burning US flag, body of Alan Kurdi). The 2012 attack was devastating in particular, with Shamoon wiping data on over 30,000 computers, crippling the company's activity for weeks. Historically, the malware has been tied to the Iranian regime, but it's unclear if Iranian hackers were behind this latest attacks. This new Shamoon version was revealed to the world when an Italian engineer uploaded the malware on VirusTotal, triggering detections at all major cyber-security firms across the globe.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:26:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  86. Peeling off slimy biofilms like old stickers

    Slimy, hard-to-clean bacterial mats called biofilms cause problems ranging from medical infections to clogged drains and fouled industrial equipment. Now, researchers have found a way to cleanly and completely peel off these notorious sludges.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:22:13 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  87. Origins of Pain

    Research in mice identifies a set of neurons responsible for sustained pain and resulting pain-coping behaviors Findings point to the existence of separate neural pathways that regulate threat avoidance versus injury mitigation Study can inform new ways to gauge the efficacy of candidate pain therapies by assessing behaviors stemming from different pathways.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:22:09 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  88. Biologists turn eavesdropping viruses into bacterial assassins

    Researchers have found a bacteria-killing virus that can listen in on bacterial conversations -- and then they made it attack diseases including salmonella, E. coli and cholera.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:22:06 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  89. How the brain tells you to scratch that itch

    It's a maddening cycle that has affected us all: it starts with an itch that triggers scratching, but scratching only makes the itchiness worse. Now, researchers have revealed the brain mechanism driving this uncontrollable itch-scratching feedback loop. Researchers showed that the activity of a small subset of neurons, located in a deep brain region called the periaqueductal gray, tracks itch-evoked scratching behavior in mice.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:22:03 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  90. Exercise-induced hormone irisin triggers bone remodeling in mice

    Exercise has been touted to build bone mass, but exactly how it actually accomplishes this is a matter of debate. Now, researchers show that an exercise-induced hormone activates cells that are critical for bone remodeling in mice. A study identifies a receptor for irisin, an exercise hormone, and shows that irisin impacts sclerostin in mice, a major cellular regulator of bone structure in humans.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:21:58 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  91. Neanderthal genes give clues to human brain evolution

    A distinctive feature of modern humans is our round (globular) skulls and brains. Researchers report that present-day humans who carry particular Neanderthal DNA fragments have heads that are slightly less rounded, revealing genetic clues to the evolution of modern brain shape and function.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:21:53 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  92. Whether a urinary tract infection recurs may depend on the bacterial strain

    Genetically diverse bacterial strains that cause urinary tract infections differ in their ability to trigger protective immune responses in mice, potentially explaining why these infections frequently recur in many patients, according to a new study.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:21:48 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  93. Scientific basis for EPA's Endangerment Finding is stronger than ever

    The evidence used to support the EPA's 2009 Endangerment Finding on greenhouse gases is even stronger and more conclusive now. This finding comes three months after a senior Republican senator said that the Trump Administration might still try to repeal the landmark decision.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:21:41 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  94. Shrinking objects to the nanoscale

    Researchers have invented a new way to fabricate nanoscale 3D objects of nearly any shape. They can also pattern the objects with a variety of useful materials, including metals, semiconducting quantum dots, and DNA.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:21:28 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  95. New interactions between Ebola virus and human proteins discovered

    Several new connections have been discovered between the proteins of the Ebola virus and human host cells, a finding that provides insight on ways to prevent the deadly Ebola virus from reproducing and could lead to novel ways to fight these lethal viral infections, according to a new study.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:21:25 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  96. Novel mechanisms of dengue and Zika virus infections and link to microcephaly

    New insights into how dengue and Zika viruses cause disease reveal strategies the viruses use to successfully infect their host and a link to microcephaly.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:21:23 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  97. CRISPR joins battle of the bulge, fights obesity without edits to genome

    A weighty new study shows that CRISPR therapies can cut fat without cutting DNA. Researchers describe how a modified version of CRISPR was used to ramp up the activity of certain genes and prevent severe obesity in mice with genetic mutations that predispose them to extreme weight gain. Importantly, the researchers achieved long-lasting weight control without making a single edit to the genome.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:21:17 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  98. Noncoding mutations contribute to autism risk

    A whole-genome sequencing study of nearly 2,000 families has implicated mutations in 'promoter regions' of the genome -- regions that precede the start of a gene -- in autism. The study is the first genome-wide analysis to uncover a role for mutations in the noncoding portion of the genome in any human condition.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:21:15 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  99. YouTube removed 58 million videos last quarter for violating policies

    YouTube has been publishing quarterly reports that detail how many videos it removes for policy violations and in its most recent report, YouTube has also included additional data regarding channel and comment removals. Between July and September, th...

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:21:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  100. Could Medical Procedures Transmit Alzheimer's?

    A protein associated with the degenerative disease was passed to eight patients decades ago in contaminated growth hormones

    -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:20:00 De: Scientific American Science news and technology updates from Scientific American Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  101. Parker Solar Probe Snaps Hellscape Photo From Inside the Sun's Corona

    In August, NASA launched the Parker Solar Probe with a lofty goal: to touch the sun. Okay, “touch” is a bit of an overstatement, but they are getting close. In November, the probe actually got close enough to snap a photo from within a particularly hellish portion of the sun’s atmosphere. The first time you see it, it looks like a hot mess, but if you look more closely, there’s actually a distinguishable feature or two.

    Eventually, the Solar Probe will get within 4 million miles of the sun. This photo was taken on November 8 at 1:12 a.m. Eastern about 16.9 million miles from the sun itself, which is within the solar corona — the outermost area of the sun’s atmosphere that’s actually hundreds of times hotter than the sun itself. This is by far the closest a human-made object has ever gotten to the sun, says Russ Howard, Ph.D., the principal investigator behind the Wide-field Imager for Solar Probe (WISPR), the instrument that captured the image. But he also tells Inverse that this photo is really just a taste of way more interesting things to come. In the near future, the probe is going to fly right into the heart of the structure seen in this picture.

    Read More... Parker Solar Probe Snaps Hellscape Photo From Inside the Sun's Corona

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:19:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  102. Scientists maximize the effectiveness of platinum in fuel cells

    Scientists have identified a new catalyst that uses only about a quarter as much platinum as current technology by maximizing the effectiveness of the available platinum.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:15:37 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  103. Age-related immunity loss

    Research in mouse cells identifies defective metabolic pathway in aging immune T cells. The pathway is critical for switching T cells from dormancy into illness-fighting mode. In experiments, researchers restored lagging T-cell function by adding small-molecule compounds. Findings suggest possible mechanism behind weakened immunity common in the elderly.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:15:34 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  104. Scientists overhaul corn domestication story with multidisciplinary analysis

    Scientists are revising the history of one of the world's most important crops. Drawing on genetic and archaeological evidence, researchers have found that a predecessor of today's corn plants still bearing many features of its wild ancestor was likely brought to South America from Mexico more than 6,500 years ago. Farmers in Mexico and the southwestern Amazon continued to improve the crop over thousands of years until it was fully domesticated in each region.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:15:24 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  105. Parents' brain activity 'echoes' their infant's brain activity when they play together

    Research shows for the first time that when adults are engaged in joint play together with their infant, the parents' brains show bursts of high-frequency activity, which are linked to their baby's attention patterns and not their own.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:15:19 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  106. Machine learning to speed chemical discoveries, reduce waste

    Researchers have combined artificial neural networks with infrared thermal imaging to control and interpret chemical reactions with new precision and speed. Novel microreactors allow chemical discoveries to take place quickly and with far less environmental waste than standard large-scale reactions. The system can reduce the decision-making process about certain chemical manufacturing processes from one year to a matter of weeks, saving tons of chemical waste and energy in the process.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:15:17 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  107. Wirecutter's best deals: Save $40 on Sennheiser HD 600 headphones

    This post was done in partnership with Wirecutter. When readers choose to buy Wirecutter's independently chosen editorial picks, it may earn affiliate commissions that support its work. Read Wirecutter's continuously updated list of deals here.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:01:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  108. Corn domestication took some unexpected twists and turns

    A DNA study challenges the idea people fully tamed maize in Mexico before the plant spread.

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:00:05 De: Science News Daily news, blogs and biweekly magazine articles from Science News. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 18:27
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  109. Screen Time for Kids Might Not Be Such a Bad Thing

    Every generation faces disruptive technologies, yet many see today’s version as the end of civilization

    -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:00:00 De: Scientific American Science news and technology updates from Scientific American Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  110. Incredible shrinking 3D printer can make really tiny objects

    A method for 3D printing minuscule objects produces them at a larger size and then shrinks them to one thousandth of the original volume

    Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:00:00 De: New Scientist New Scientist - News Dernière modification:
    Article complet à lire: Ici
  111. Super Luxe 6-Piece Towel Set Is Over 60 Percent Off

    The Details:

    • Set includes 2 bath towels, 2 hand towels, & 2 washcloths
    • Luxurious 2-ply construction ensures above-average softness.
    • Made from highly absorbent 100% heavyweight 650GSM combed zero-twist cotton.
    • High-grade cotton loops—extremely durable and fast drying.
    • Why You Want It: When it comes to bath towels, most of us get used to what happens to be there. But if you venture out on the market to see how much better other products can be, you’ll likely be very surprised. This 6-Piece Towel Set from Bibb is far more soft, absorbent, and durable than the average, and right now it’s on serious discount. So if you’re looking to try out a new drying experience, take a look.

      Read More... Super Luxe 6-Piece Towel Set Is Over 60 Percent Off

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 14:00:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
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    • IPCC to take greater account of carbon storage by agroforestry systems

      Researchers have established coefficients for carbon storage in the soil and aboveground and belowground biomass of different agroforestry systems.

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:57:06 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Megacity traffic soot contributes to global warming

      Soot from road traffic in emerging countries can reach high altitudes, where it can be transported over long distances and thus contributes to global warming. The reduction of pollutants from road traffic such as soot particles from diesel cars should therefore have high priority in order to both protect the health of the population in the growing conurbations of emerging countries and reduce global warming.

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:57:03 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Accident mortel à Beauceville

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:54:20 De: Zone911 - Tout le Quebec ZONE911 est un média collaboratif de l'actualité et de l'information du domaine de l'urgence au Québec. Pompiers, policiers, paramédics, sécurité et plus. Dernière modification:
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Volvo will demo an all-electric semi in 2019, put it into production in 2020

      Volvo

      On Wednesday, Volvo Trucks North America announced that in 2019 it will demonstrate an all-electric Volvo semi truck, which it expects to go into production in 2020.

      The semi will be an all-electric VNR, similar to Volvo's current diesel VNR model, and it will be used for regional-haul operations as well as drayage (that is, transporting shipping containers from barges to their next mode of transport).

      Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:52:39 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Swarms of Sensor-Wearing Bees Could Monitor Crops Better Than Drones

      Even the most expensive, powerful drones can’t beat the humble bumblebee. Bumblebees can fly carrying almost their whole body weight, and can fly as far as 12 miles at a time, whereas even the best long-range drones can only fly up to four miles from their operators.

      To compete with commercial drones in applications like crop monitoring, a team of students and research faculty at the University of Washington strapped sensors onto bumblebees, to create a “living internet of things.”

      The bees’ little backpacks feature backscatter communication, low-power self-localization hardware, sensors, and a rechargeable battery that can last up to seven hours while sampling location once every four seconds, according to their paper, to be presented at MobiCom 2019. They fit all this onto a 102 milligram package that fits on the bees’ backs.

      When they come back to the hive, they upload the data and get a battery recharge before heading back out.

      The researchers say they envision their bee swarm someday being used on farms to collect humidity and temperature data across a field to help farmers better understand their crops. Agricultural drones are already a big market for data collection and optimization of crop fields; using bees instead could pinpoint data down to a much smaller, more specific scale, according to the researchers.

      There are a few drawbacks to using bees instead of drones to collect data, the researchers note. If the bees happen to die while in the field (their lifespans are about a month), the waste from their electronic backpacks will end up as litter, so the people operating them would need to carefully time their flights around their deaths. Also, making and attaching the electronics to the bees is currently done manually—not a very efficient way to scale to monitor a whole farm with dozens or hundreds of bees.

      Not listed in the researchers’ paper is the risk of creating a sentient bug botnet that launches the end of civilization.

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:49:12 De: Motherboard RSS feed for https://motherboard.vice.com Dernière modification:
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Quantum Network Joins Four People Together For Encrypted Messaging

      An anonymous reader shares a report: The quantum internet is starting small, but growing. Researchers have created a network that lets four users communicate simultaneously through channels secured by the laws of quantum physics, and they say it could easily be scaled up. Soren Wengerowsky at the University of Vienna and his colleagues devised a network that uses quantum key distribution (QKD) to keep messages secure [the link is paywalled]. The general principle of QKD is that two photons are entangled, meaning their quantum properties are linked. Further reading: Nature.

      Read more of this story at Slashdot.

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:46:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Arkansas Politician Introduces Bill To Make It Illegal For Social Media Companies To Block Content He Likes

      Arkansas state rep Johnny Rye is in galaxy mind mode. He's introduced a bill that aims to stop "censorship" by social media platforms by allowing the government to compel speech. I'm sure the irony is lost on Rye. But it's probably not the only thing sailing over Rep. Rye's head. (h/t Sarah McLaughlin)

      What Rye is trying to stop is social media companies moderating their own platforms. He appears to feel conservatives are being "censored" by Facebook, Twitter, etc. and thinks rolling over the First Amendment and Section 230 immunity is going to cure this perceived ill.

      Holy hell, the bill [PDF] is a mess. I'm going to have to quote from it at length because it's the only way any discussion of it can achieve semi-coherence. Here's the gist of it, from David Ramsey of the Arkansas Times:

      The bill would allow plaintiffs to seek damages of a minimum of $75,000 "per purposeful deletion or censoring of the social media website user's speech" plus actual damages and punitive damages if aggravating factors are present. Only social media companies with at least 75 million subscribers would be subject to Rye's bill.

      Slightly more specifically, the "Stop Social Media Censorship Act" says this:

      The owner or operator of a social media website who resides in this state is subject to a private right of action by a social media website user if the social media website purposely:

      (i) Deletes or censors a social media website user's religious or political speech; or

      (ii) Uses an algorithm to suppress religious or political speech.

      How does Rep. Rye get around the fact that private companies can moderate content on their platforms however they'd like without it being "censorship?" Easy. He just unilaterally declares Facebook, et al to be "public utilities." Problem solved.

      A social media website is considered a public utility under this section.

      Pretty cool. I didn't know writing worked that way. Let me see if I've got the hang of this…

      Rep. Rye is considered a nuisance and threat to public safety under this section.

      Now I just need to send the cops around to restore public safety by taking Rep. Rye out of the rotation.

      The good news is social media companies can limit the monetary damages by restoring/uncensoring posts a user complains about. (Presumably using an in-court complaint form, rather than the site's online forms.) There's your compelled speech, which is just another misshapen cherry on the top of shit sundae.

      Here's Rye's tiny concession to the First Amendment, which isn't really a concession, nor even compliant with the First Amendment. This must be Rye's idea of "narrow crafting."

      A social media website is immune from liability under this section if it deletes or censors a social media website user's speech or uses an algorithm to disfavor or censure speech that calls for immediate acts of violence, is obscene, or pornographic in nature.

      Rye is generously allowing platforms to engage in the sort of moderation they already engage in. They're free to moderate certain kinds of speech, just not the kind of speech Rye likes. And if users aren't willing to sue over "censorship" themselves, the state is empowered to draw inferences on their behalf.

      The Attorney General may bring a civil cause of action under this section on behalf of social media website users who reside in this state whose religious speech or political speech has been censored by a social media website.

      If you're wondering why Rep. Rye has crafted this monument to his own stupidity, David Ramsey has your answer:

      Rye's bill comes in the same week that Sen. Jason Rapert vociferously complained about being temporarily barred from sending tweets by Twitter. A tweet that Rapert sent out regarding Muslims was found by the company to violate its "hateful conduct policy." The company imposed a timeout that lasted at least 12 hours, according to a printout of Twitter's communication that Rapert held up to the camera in a Facebook Live post. The offending tweet has apparently been removed.

      Here are a couple other things Rye is pitching this legislative session:

      Make it a felony to relocate, alter, remove, rename, rededicate or otherwise disturb historical monuments on public property without the permission of the Arkansas History Commission.

      Create a special license plate for members of the Arkansas Masonic Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons.

      So, a "no tearing down Confederate war hero statues" bill, and a special license plate for himself. From Rye's bio:

      He is active in the Lions Club and Masonic Lodge.

      This wave of proposed legislation follows last year's failed attempt to repeal the state's recognition of same-sex marriages.

      And he's looking for even more internet regulation, this time under the guise of fighting sex trafficking. This bill [PDF] would ban anyone from selling any devices that access the internet without pre-installed "blocking software." This is at least as batshit as his social media censorship proposal.

      A distributor shall not in this state manufacture, sell, offer for sale, lease, or distribute a product that makes content accessible on the internet unless the product:

      (A) Contains active and properly operating blocking software that renders obscene material inaccessible;

      (B) Prohibits access to content that is prohibited under this chapter;

      (C) Prohibits access to revenge pornography;

      (D) Prohibits access to a website that facilitates prostitution; and

      (E) Prohibits access to a website that facilitates human trafficking.

      The list of "prohibited content" includes revenge porn, "specified anatomical areas," and obscene material. The reseller or manufacturer violating this law is subject to a $500 fine… wait for it:

      ...for each prohibited image, video or audio depiction, or website found to be accessible at the time of the offense.

      On top of adding new software to their devices, resellers and manufacturers will also foot the bill for a 24/7 complaint hotline to report overblocking/underblocking.

      The good news (I guess) is that Arkansans still have the option to see turgid penises and whatnot. All they have to do is pay $20 and state, in writing, that they're above the age of 18 and definitely want to see as many "specified anatomical areas" as possible. Proof of age must also be submitted. The bill does not specify whether this will restore access to revenge porn or trafficked humans, but one would assume it's an all-inclusive fee.

      Sex trafficking will somehow be prevented by the state AG dumping collected fines into a strongbox marked "for the children," because nothing's too on the nose for Johnny Rye:

      Fines levied by a court under subdivision (a)(2)(A) of this section shall be deposited into the Safe Harbor Fund for Sexually Exploited Children.

      Whew. What a time to be alive. And in Arkansas. And knowing you still have two more years before you can unceremoniously return Johnny Rye to the private sector he so very badly wants to harm.



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      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:44:00 De: Techdirt Easily digestible tech news... Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:03
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    • Daily Deal: The Complete Productivity Booster Bundle

      The Complete Productivity Booster Bundle has 8 courses designed to help you get more done in a day more efficiently. You'll learn how to develop razor-sharp focus, and how to use some of the most up to date advancements in productivity, motivation, and self-improvement. Other courses cover time management, habit building, creating a successful environment, and more. The bundle is on sale for $29.

      Note: The Techdirt Deals Store is powered and curated by StackCommerce. A portion of all sales from Techdirt Deals helps support Techdirt. The products featured do not reflect endorsements by our editorial team.



      Permalink | Comments | Email This Story

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:41:00 De: Techdirt Easily digestible tech news... Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:03
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    • NASA Works Out "Visit Details" After Steph Curry Admits Moon Landing Gaffe

      Golden State Warrior star Steph Curry has had some dumb takes lately, but at least he’s smart enough to acknowledge his missteps. Curry was recently blasted by critics for stating on a podcast that he didn’t believe the United States had actually landed on the moon. Clapping back, NASA offered to give the star a tour of its Lunar Lab. On Thursday, Curry claimed his conspiracy theory was all a joke — and now NASA’s ready to make good on its offer.

      NASA Public Relations head Allard Beutel, who first extended Curry the invitation to the Lunar Lab, tells Inverse he’d heard about “Mr. Curry taking us up on our offer,” noting that “We still need to work out all the visit details.”

      Read More... NASA Works Out "Visit Details" After Steph Curry Admits Moon Landing Gaffe

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:40:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
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    • Virgin Galactic Achieves Major Milestone With Its Futuristic Spaceplane

      Richard Branson’s space tourism venture finally accomplished what it has been trying to do since 2004: Send an aircraft to the edge of space. Virgin Galactic successfully conducted a crewed test flight of its SpaceShipTwo, aka VSS Unity, its suborbital spaceplane Thursday. This is a major stride toward extending its futuristic service to paying customers. You can check out some of the footage it captured in the video above.

      Two pilots fired the VSS Unity’s rocket motors for one minute, longer than ever before to take the vessel exactly 51.4 miles (82.7 kilometers) above the Mojave Desert. That’s just above the United States Air Force’s 50-mile space boundary, meaning Virgin Galactic has beat SpaceX to crewed space travel. The spaceplane was released from its carrier aircraft — WhiteKnightTwo — at roughly 10:35 a.m. Eastern and reached a peak speed of Mach 2.9, or about 2.9 times the speed of sound (2,225 mph). In a statement to Inverse, Branson said Virgin Galactic will be further pushing its VSS Unity to new heights in the future.

      Read More... Virgin Galactic Achieves Major Milestone With Its Futuristic Spaceplane

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:38:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
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    • The Painful, Costly Journey of Returned Goods -- and How You End Up Purchasing Some of Them Again

      Buyers return a huge number of packages they buy from Amazon and other e-commerce sites, so much so that retailers are sometimes left with little choice but to get rid of large swaths of inventory at a cost. Last year, customers in the U.S. returned about $351 billion worth of items that they had purchased from brick-and-mortar retailers and online stores, according to estimates by National Retail Federation. CNBC: There's a good chance that the $100 printer, the $300 wide-screen monitor, or the $170 router you recently bought from Amazon weren't supplied to the e-commerce giant by their original manufacturers. In fact, the order may have been fulfilled by someone like Casey Parris, who resells items that customers previously returned to retailers. Based in Florida, Parris spends about five hours each day visiting thrift stores and scanning auction and liquidation websites for interesting items, he told CNBC. Sometimes he finds auto parts, other times it's a pair of sneakers, and occasionally he purchases printer cartridges -- all with the goal of reselling them. Walter Blake, who lives in Michigan, does the same. For years, he's been selling electronic items on Amazon that he acquires from a network of places. Blake and Parris are part of a growing cottage industry where dealers acquire discarded items at very low prices, only to resell some of them back on Amazon and eBay at a premium.

      Read more of this story at Slashdot.

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:32:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Spock smiles in the face of danger in new trailer for Star Trek: Discovery S2

      Enlarge / Spock relishes the prospect of danger. "Are you smiling, Spock?" "Yes, Captain, I believe I am." (credit: CBS All Access)

      Everyone's favorite sober-minded Vulcan, Spock, cracks a rare smile in a new, action-packed trailer for Star Trek: Discovery's upcoming second season. This go-round, the crew of the USS Discovery will be facing its greatest threat yet: a being or entity intent on wiping out all sentient beings in the Universe.

      Discovery is a prequel to the original Star Trek, set roughly 10 years before Captain Kirk and his crew took over the USS Enterprise and boldly went where no man had gone before. The first trailer debuted at New York Comic Con back in October. That's when we learned that last season's Captain Gabriel Lorca has been replaced by iconic character Christopher Pike (Anson Mount). The Klingons have hair again (fans did not care for the bald look), and Michelle Yeoh returns as the former ruler of the Terran Empire, Philippa Georgiou.

      We also saw the debut of Rebecca Romijn as Number One and got our first glimpse of a young, bearded Spock (now played by Ethan Peck). His appearance is linked to the mysterious vision of a "red angel" experienced by his adoptive sister, Science Specialist Michael Burnham (Sonequa Martin-Green). Spock also had recurring visions of such a creature, but the first trailer was coy about what it might mean.

      Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:31:55 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Stunning eco-resort in Colombia built out of compressed-earth blocks and bamboo

      Related: + Hotel Cannúa

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:30:17 De: Inhabitat Green design & innovation for a better world Dernière modification:
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Data use draining your battery? Tiny device to speed up memory while also saving power

      Millions of new memory cells could be part of a computer chip and save power for smart devices, thanks to the discovery of a previously unobserved functionality in a super thin material.

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:25:09 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo reaches space for the first time

      Virgin Galactic has come a long way since its tragic 2014 crash. The company's SpaceShipTwo has reached space after months of testing, flying to an altitude of 271,268 feet before returning to Earth. The stay was brief (SST fired its rocket for all...

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:24:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Kid Scientists Capture Rare Footage of Endangered Animals on Camera Traps

      It’s not every day that school projects get to live on forever at the Smithsonian Institution. But that’s exactly what happened when students around the world created a network of wildlife camera traps—at times capturing more photos of rare and endangered species, such as Bengal tigers, than researchers in dedicated preserves.

      Children from 28 schools in the US, Mexico, India, and Kenya were recently part of an experimental push to transform students into citizen scientists.

      Outfitted with camera traps and a bit of help from professionals, the students collected 13,710 detections of 83 native mammal species, including six endangered animals such as the black rhinoceros, Bengal tiger, and the newly endangered beisa oryx.

      Grevy's zebra, black rhinoceros, Bengal tiger, dhole, jaguarundi, dog chasing a hare. Image: eMammal

      The project was helmed by Stephanie Schuttler, a research associate at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. Schuttler and an international team of authors published their findings to the journal BioScience on Wednesday.

      Eventually, the program grew to include schools in Maharashtra, India; Jalisco, Mexico; and Laikipia County, Kenya.

      “I was nervous we would just get [photos of] stray cats and dogs,” Schuttler told Motherboard, “but the diversity that we captured” was a pleasant surprise.

      The students at a school in India who captured more photos of Bengal tigers than researchers were “super proud” of their footage,” Schuttler said. “I still get tiger photos from some of them because they live really close to tigers—literally in their backyards.”

      Kenya’s schools stood out for having the highest species richness, the study notes, logging a total of 37 native species. Their traps also included footage of two animals not captured by cameras at local conservancies, namely the endangered African wild dog and critically endangered black rhinoceros.

      Even students in North Carolina saw some exciting predators. Several urban coyotes, which only recently moved into North Carolina and are thriving there, were caught on their cameras.

      The expansive effort started in North Carolina where select teachers in five counties were trained on camera trap protocols. The team also showed educators how to use eMammal, a software built by the Smithsonian Institution that lets people upload and identify camera trap photos.

      “The most important thing is set [the traps] at knee height on a tree,” Schuttler explained, “making sure they’re low enough to capture little animals on the ground as well as big animals.”

      Each school was provided with motion-activated cameras that were placed around the campus according to protocol. For the most part, Schuttler said, the children were as adept at setting up their traps as adult citizen scientists. There was some concern about theft—for example, "issues with drug cartels” in Mexico—but not enough to deter the project, Schuttler said.

      The students’ findings were then reviewed by experts and stored for perpetuity at a Smithsonian Data Repository.

      “Yes, they see cool animal photos but ownership of data is important and so is contributing to real scientific study,” Schuttler said.

      “Scientists hundreds of years from now might even be looking at your photos so they really have purpose and meaning.”

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:21:01 De: Motherboard RSS feed for https://motherboard.vice.com Dernière modification:
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    • Australia's Ancient 'Marsupial Lion' Was Absolutely Terrifying

      Australia is famous for producing nightmare-inducing animals, from birds that break and enter to deadly funnel-weaving spiders. So it should be no surprise that the extinct marsupial lion (Thylacoleo carnifex), the biggest meat-eating mammal ever known to roam Australia, is one of the gnarliest animals in the fossil record.

      For the first time, scientists have reconstructed the entire skeleton of this 200-pound marsupial, which died out some 46,000 years ago. The results, published Wednesday in PLOS One, are based on newly discovered fossils and comparisons to extant relatives.

      Mounted display of Thylacoleo carnifex at the Wonambi Fossil Centre, Naracoorte Caves National Park, South Australia. Image: William Harris

      This killer bite wasn’t the only weapon in the marsupial lion’s arsenal. T. carnifex was also built like a Mack Truck, differentiating it from the sleek big cats that it’s nicknamed for (the marsupial lion was not a close relative of lions, but was about the same size as modern lionesses). Lions are built for speed and endurance, but marsupial lions were bodyslammers that leveled prey like Diprotodon, the biggest marsupial known to walk planet Earth.

      Read More: This Extinct Wolf-Sized Otter Demolished Prey With Its Forceful Bite

      “The powerful forelimbs equipped with grasping hands and slashing first digit would amply serve to both to restrain a victim or a carcass,” Wells and Camens said in the study. “Their ability to anchor the hind quarters using the tail as a brace freed the [limbs and hands] to hold, lacerate, or eviscerate struggling prey and/or to hold a carcass while severing limb elements, flesh, and hide with a rearwards pull of the shoulders, neck, and thorax.”

      Given how utterly badass these predators sound, it’s a wonder they went extinct. The reasons why T. carnifex died out are not fully understood, but likely culprits are long-term climate change and anthropogenic pressures, as humans arrived in Australia at least 65,000 years ago.

      Though the marsupial lion is long gone, its legacy as one of Australia’s most terrifying killing machines—a competitive category—lives on.

      Get six of our favorite Motherboard stories every day by signing up for our newsletter.

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:20:41 De: Motherboard RSS feed for https://motherboard.vice.com Dernière modification:
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Virgin Galactic Successfully Reaches Space

      The latest test flight by Sir Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic successfully rocketed to space and back. From a report: The firm's SpaceShipTwo passenger rocket ship reached a height of 82.7km, beyond the altitude at which space is said to begin. It marked the plane's fourth test flight and followed earlier setbacks in the firm's space programme. Sir Richard is in a race with Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos to send the first fee-paying passengers into space. He founded the commercial spaceflight company in 2004, shortly after Mr Musk started SpaceX and Jeff Bezos established Blue Origin. In 2008, Virgin Galactic first promised sub-orbital spaceflight trips for tourists would be taking place "within 18 months". It has since regularly made similar promises to have space flights airborne in the near future.

      Read more of this story at Slashdot.

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:19:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Look Up! Gleaming Geminid Meteor Shower of 2018 Peaks Tonight

      The celestial display is expected to be the best meteor shower of 2018

      -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:15:00 De: Scientific American Science news and technology updates from Scientific American Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Early animals: Death near the shoreline, not life on land

      Our understanding of when the very first animals started living on land is helped by identifying trace fossils -- the tracks and trails left by ancient animals -- in sedimentary rocks that were deposited on the continents.

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:12:51 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Tangled magnetic fields power cosmic particle accelerators

      Magnetic field lines tangled like spaghetti in a bowl might be behind the most powerful particle accelerators in the universe. That's the result of a new computational study that simulated particle emissions from distant active galaxies.

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:12:42 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • How particles arrange themselves into complex structures

      Complexity in nature, whether in chlorophyll or in living organisms, often results from self-assembly and is considered particularly robust. Compact clusters of elemental particles can be shown to be of practical relevance, and are found in atomic nuclei, nano particles or viruses. Researchers have decoded the structure and the process behind the formation of one class of such highly ordered clusters. Their findings have increased understanding of how structures are formed in clusters.

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:12:39 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • How teens deal with stress may affect their blood pressure, immune system

      Most teens get stressed out by their families from time to time, but whether they bottle those emotions up or put a positive spin on things may affect certain processes in the body, including blood pressure and how immune cells respond to bacterial invaders, according to researchers.

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:12:36 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Molecular causes of brain injury associated with gut condition uncovered

      Using a mouse model of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), researchers have uncovered the molecular causes of the condition and its associated brain injury.

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:12:33 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Monitoring the environment with artificial intelligence

      Microorganisms perform key functions in ecosystems and their diversity reflects the health of their environment. Researchers use genomic tools to sequence the DNA of microorganisms in samples, and then exploit this considerable amount of data with artificial intelligence. They build predictive models capable of establishing a diagnosis of the health of ecosystems and identify species that perform important functions. This new approach will significantly increase the observation capacity of large ecosystems.

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:12:29 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Neuroscientists uncover sensory switches controlling infanticide and parental behavior

      Many species of mammals have evolved what appear to be paradoxical behaviors towards their young. Like humans, most exhibit nurturing, protective behaviors, and in some circumstances even act as surrogate parents. However, virgin males often engage in infanticide as a strategy to propagate their own genes. How are these conflicting social behaviors controlled?

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:12:26 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Watching brain cells fire

      Brain scientists have plenty of ways to track the activity of individual neurons in the brain, but they're all invasive. Now, researchers have found a way to literally watch neurons fire -- no electrodes or chemical modifications required.

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:12:21 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Chemical biologists unearth cause of a rare brain disorder

      In pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1b, two key biological structures are blocked from binding to one another -- which ultimately stunts critical brain growth.

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:12:13 De: Sciencedaily Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:03
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • The UN Is Now Working Directly With Companies to Fight Climate Change

      H&M, Zara, Levi’s, and Gap are among some of the big name signatories of a new climate change pledge under the United Nations that aims to reduce the fashion industry’s impact on the climate.

      The document, called the Fashion Industry Charter for Climate Action, includes concrete goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. It also marks the first time that the UN has created an industry-specific charter, signalling a shift in how the intergovernmental agency plans fight climate change.

      “They haven’t done this type of industry charter before,” Nate Aden, a senior fellow at the World Resources Institute, an environmental research nonprofit, said in a phone call. “Generally, the UN focuses on working with countries and all the negotiations are with governments. But there’s clearly a need to work directly with companies, stakeholders, and emissions producers, too, so this is a really good development.”

      Despite a worldwide commitment under the Paris Climate Agreement to prevent global temperatures from surpassing two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial temperatures, national governments have been slow to implement change. The United States withdrew from the Paris Climate Agreement altogether and when governments do make changes, it can backfire. The massive “yellow vest” protests in France this month were initially sparked by outrage over a carbon tax on gas, for example.

      Aden said that this novel charter indicates a new tactic: working directly with the industries that are producing the greenhouse gases, rather than waiting on governments to enact laws that regulate these industries.

      “It's much more effective than waiting on policymakers to do the right thing because obviously that’s not going to happen any time soon,” Aden said, adding that the fashion industry was probably the first choice because it’s an industry that’s particularly sensitive to consumer demands, which have been swaying towards pro-climate decisions in recent years.

      The charter includes a commitment from all signatories to reduce their individual greenhouse gas emissions 30 percent by 2030, against a 2015 baseline. For example, H&M reported that it emitted 151,753 tonnes of carbon dioxide in 2015, so by 2030 it aims to produce no more than 106,227 tonnes of CO2, under the charter.

      The charter also puts in place a goal for all the companies to achieve net-zero emissions—meaning for every ounce of carbon they produce, they balance it by investing in carbon sequestering, like planting forests—by 2050. There is no enforcement of these goals from the UN, but Abel said pressure from financial institutions and consumers to meet the targets will help keep the industry in check.

      The fashion industry, while not the worst polluter, is notoriously hard on the environment, contributing an estimated 5 percent of the total global emissions every year. It takes 10,000 liters of water to grow the cotton needed for just one pair of jeans, for example, and textile production produces 1.2 billion tonnes of CO2 a year, more than international flights.

      By working directly with major companies, as well as lesser-known entities along the industry’s complex supply chain, the UN may have found a more effective strategy for creating real impact, especially when such a public pledge will likely be carefully policed by consumers who want to support green companies.

      “It’s demonstrating that companies can not only survive economically, but survive economically by doing the right thing,” Aden said. “This presents example for other sectors that this kind of sector-wide approach can be effective, and we really need that now because a lot of companies are dropping the ball.”

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:08:29 De: Motherboard RSS feed for https://motherboard.vice.com Dernière modification:
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    • Hiding in plain sight: The YouTubers crowdfunding piracy

      I never imagined I would be watching Kitchen Nightmares, starring the world renowned chef Gordon Ramsay, in my downtime on YouTube. I knew of Ramsay and his ruthlessness from shows like Hell's Kitchen, but I had never heard of Kitchen Nightmares unti...

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 13:00:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Modern Neanderthal Genes Are Linked to the Evolution of Modern Human Skulls

      A burgeoning body of research suggests that, in many ways, we Homo sapiens are not so different from our close relative Homo neanderthalensis. Like living humans, Neanderthals created art, expressed culture, and cared for members of their community. But we do differ from them in two, possibly connected, ways — the shape of our skulls and the fact that we haven’t gone extinct.

      That’s because skulls, crucially, hold brains. Modern human skulls have a round, globular shape, whereas Neanderthals skulls are elongated. In a study released Wednesday in Current Biology, an international team of scientists became the first to identify the genetic factors that likely led to these compelling differences in shape. In turn, they’ve inched us one step closer to an understanding of what it means to be a member of our distinct species.

      Read More... Modern Neanderthal Genes Are Linked to the Evolution of Modern Human Skulls

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 12:37:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Hip Stocks App Robinhood Rolls Out Pretty Good Checking & Savings Accounts

      Since its arrival on the financial tech scene five year ago, the stock trading app Robinhood has lived up to its name, seemingly delighting in disrupting the online stock trading game. Now, the startup’s vastly popular “no fee” policy has been extended to other financial services like checking and savings accounts.

      Today, Robinhood introduced “Robinhood Checking & Savings,” an online banking structure with no account minimums, no overdraft charges and no ATM fees - really, truly, like, no fees. And there’s more: a three percent interest rate on both checking and savings accounts, high enough to make it one of the most competitive rates on the market. Is this the future? Is this heaven? Is this a business suit full of mice whispering, “Come bank with us, millennials?”

      Read More... Hip Stocks App Robinhood Rolls Out Pretty Good Checking & Savings Accounts

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 12:37:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • If You're Worried About Bad EU Internet Regulation, Just Wait Until You See The New Terrorist Regulation

      This seems to be the year for awful internet regulation by the EU. At least there were some redeeming qualities in the GDPR, but they were few and far between, and much of the GDPR is terrible and is creating real problems for free speech online, while simultaneously, undermining privacy and giving repressive governments a new tool to go after critics. Oh, and in the process, it has only made Google that much more dominant in Europe, harming competition.

      And, then, of course, there's the still ongoing debate about the EU Copyright Directive, which will also be hellish on free speech. The entire point of Article 13 in that Directive is to wipe away the intermediary liability protections that enable websites to host your content. Without such protections, it is not difficult to see how it will lead to a widespread stifling of ideas, not to mention many smaller platforms for hosting content exiting the market entirely.

      But here's the thing: both of those EU regulations are absolutely nothing compared to the upcoming EU Terrorist Regulation. We mentioned this a bit back in August, with the EU Commission pushing for the rule that all terrorist content must be taken down in an hour or face massive fines and possible criminal liability. Earlier this year, Joan Barata at Stanford wrote a compelling paper detailing just how extreme parts of the proposed regulation will go.

      Among the many questionable bits of the Terrorist Regulation are that it will apply no matter how small a platform is and even if they're not in the EU, so long as the EU claims they have a "significant number" of EU users. Also, if a platform isn't even based in the EU, part of the proposal would require the companies to hire a "representative" in the EU to respond to these takedown demands. If the government orders a platform to take down "terrorist" content, a platform has to take it down within an hour and then set up "proactive measures" to stop the same content from ever being uploaded (i.e., mandatory filters).

      Oh, and of course, this mechanism for rapid and permanent censorship based solely on the government's say so, has... a ridiculously vague "definition" of what counts as "terrorist content."

      'terrorist content' means one or more of the following information:

      (a) inciting or advocating, including by glorifying, the commission of terrorist offences, thereby causing a danger that such acts be committed;
      (b) encouraging the contribution to terrorist offences;
      (c) promoting the activities of a terrorist group, in particular by encouraging the participation in or support to a terrorist group within the meaning of Article 2(3) of Directive (EU) 2017/541;
      (d) instructing on methods or techniques for the purpose of committing terrorist offences.

      There are all sorts of problems with this, and as the IP-Watch site notes, this appears to be a recipe for private censorship on the internet.

      Recently, a large group of public interest groups sent a letter to EU regulators laying out in great detail all of the problems of the regulation. I'm going to quote a huge chunk of the letter, because it's so thorough:

      Several aspects of the proposed Regulation would significantly endanger freedom of expression and information in Europe:

      • Vague and broad definitions: The Regulation uses vague and broad definitions to describe ‘terrorist content’ which are not in line with the Directive on Combating Terrorism. This increases the risk of arbitrary removal of online content shared or published by human rights defenders, civil society organisations, journalists or individuals based on, among others, their perceived political affiliation, activism, religious practice or national origin. In addition, judges and prosecutors in Member States will be left to define the substance and boundaries of the scope of the Regulation. This would lead to uncertainty for users, hosting service providers, and law enforcement, and the Regulation would fail to meet its objectives.
      • ‘Proactive measures’: The Regulation imposes ‘duties of care’ and a requirement to take ‘proactive measures’ on hosting service providers to prevent the re-upload of content. These requirements for ‘proactive measures’ can only be met using automated means, which have the potential to threaten the right to free expression as they would lack safeguards to prevent abuse or provide redress where content is removed in error. The Regulation lacks the proper transparency, accountability and redress mechanisms to mitigate this threat. The obligation applies to all hosting services providers, regardless of their size, reach, purpose, or revenue models, and does not allow flexibility for collaborative platforms.
      • Instant removals: The Regulation empowers undefined ‘competent authorities’ to order the removal of particular pieces of content within one hour, with no authorisation or oversight by courts. Removal requests must be honoured within this short time period regardless of any legitimate objections platforms or their users may have to removal of the content specified, and the damage to free expression and access to information may already be irreversible by the time any future appeal process is complete.
      • Terms of service over rule of law: The Regulation allows these same competent authorities to notify hosting service providers of potential terrorist content that companies must check against their terms of service and hence not against the law. This will likely lead to the removal of legal content as company terms of service often restrict expression that may be distasteful or unpopular, but not unlawful. It will also undermine law enforcement agencies for whom terrorist posts can be useful sources in investigations.

      The European Commission has not presented sufficient evidence to support the necessity of the proposed measures. The Impact Assessment accompanying the European Commission’s proposal states that only 6% of respondents to a recent public consultation have encountered terrorist content online. In Austria, which publishes data on unlawful content reports to its national hotline, approximately 75% of content reported as unlawful were in fact legal. It is thus likely that the actual number of respondents who have encountered terrorist content is much lower than the reported 6%. In fact, 75% percent of the respondents to the public consultation considered the internet to be safe.

      And that's not all. The UN's Special Rapporteur on the Promotion and Protection of the Right to Freedom of Opinion and Expression (yup, that's the title), David Kaye, has also sent a letter warning of the problems of such a regulation on free speech. It's 14 pages long, but the key point:

      ...we wish to express our views regarding the overly broad definition of terrorist content in the Proposal that may encompass legitimate expression protected under international human rights law. We note with serious concern what we believe to be insufficient consideration given to human rights protections in the context of to the proposed rules governing content moderation policies. We recall in this respect that the mechanisms set up in Articles 4-6 may lead to infringements to the right to access to information, freedom of opinion, expression, and association, and impact interlinked political and public interest processes. We are further troubled by the lack of attention to human rights responsibilities incumbent on business enterprises in line with the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights.

      In other words, yet another European regulation targeting internet companies (many of whom are not based in Europe) that will ultimately lead to (1) greater censorship (2) more consolidation by internet giants, as smaller platforms won't be able to compete, and (3) massive "unintended" consequences for the internet as a whole.

      Maybe it's time we just kick the EU off the internet. Let them build their own.



      Permalink | Comments | Email This Story

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 12:33:08 De: Techdirt Easily digestible tech news... Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:03
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    • Zero-waste kit ensures reusable essentials are always nearby

      The zero-waste movement has consistently gained momentum over the past ten years with many millennials focusing on minimalistic lifestyles and conservation of natural resources. More than any generation in nearly a century, attitudes towards lower consumption, conscientious purchasing, and limited waste are a big part of societal discussion and awareness. One advocate who has practiced a zero-waste lifestyle for several years has taken the next step in helping others do the same. <!--more--> Marina...

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 12:30:04 De: Inhabitat Green design & innovation for a better world Dernière modification:
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    • Google adds screen time management to Chromebooks

      When Google brought its Family Link parental controls to Chromebook, they weren't all that useful because there were limited options available. Now, Google is offering parents more tools to supervise how their offspring use their laptops.

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 12:30:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
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    • Heart Rate Variability (HRV): What It Is and How to Improve It

      Researchers at Harvard University have gone as far as to say that measuring your Heart Rate Variability is “a visual insight into the most primitive part of your brain”

      -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 12:30:00 De: Scientific American Science news and technology updates from Scientific American Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Hands-on: Switch’s NES controllers offer unmatched old-school authenticity

      Enlarge / Now you're playing with power.

      Playing old-school games on the Switch thus far has been a choice between various control compromises. You can use two Joy-Cons held in two hands, but the tiny buttons and lack of a true d-pad make this setup less than ideal. Holding a single Joy-Con sideways eliminates the d-pad completely and forces you to curve your grip around a hand-crampingly small control surface. A Switch Pro Controller or various third-party solutions can solve these problems, but they come with relatively high prices and some added features you don't need for classic games.

      Enter Nintendo, which is offering subscribers to its new Online service the ability to buy two wireless, Switch-compatible replica NES controllers for $60 (on top of the $20 a year subscription). After spending a few hours testing the little guys (just before pre-orders start shipping out) we found them to be competent, authentic throwbacks with some important limitations.

      Truly authentic

      Anyone with fond memories of gripping an NES controller in their youth will be happy to hear that Nintendo got the authenticity darn-near perfect with these replicas. Everything from the sizing to the tactile feel to the springiness of the buttons and the d-pad is practically indistinguishable from a brand-new NES controller you might have bought three decades ago. This isn't that surprising, since the wired NES Classic Edition controllers had the same level of fidelity, but it's still nice to see.

      Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 12:28:27 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Apple to splash $10bn raisin' American bit barns

      Cupertino pats own back for forking over dollars in home country

      Apple has said it will spend $10bn on data centres in the US over the next five years, and will set up a new $1bn campus in Texas.…

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 12:23:05 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Sortie de route sur la rue Saguenay à Rouyn-Noranda

      Une sortie de route est survenue peu après 11h, sur la rue Saguenay à la hauteur du chemin England à Rouyn-Noranda. 

      DixQuatre.com Véhicule impliqué dans la sortie de route rue Saguenay Perte de contrôle

      Le conducteur aurait perdu le contrôle de son  véhicule qui s’est par la suite retrouvé hors de la route. À première vue, le conducteur qui était seul à bord n’aurait pas subi de blessures. Il a tout de même été conduit au centre hospitalier étant donné qu’il y a eu déploiement des coussins gonflables.

      Circulation entravée

      La circulation a quelque peu été entravée sur la rue Saguenay le temps des manœuvres de remorquage.

      L’article Sortie de route sur la rue Saguenay à Rouyn-Noranda est apparu en premier sur DixQuatre.com. Autheur: La rédaction

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 12:21:55 De: 10-04 Blogue Média - Abitibi-Témiscamingue Média en Abitibi-Témiscamingue Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 12:50
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • ASUS CEO resigns as company shifts mobile focus to power users

      Earlier today, ASUS announced that long-time CEO Jerry Shen is stepping down ahead of "a comprehensive corporate transformation" -- part of which involving a new co-CEO structure, as well as a major shift in mobile strategy to focus on gamers and pow...

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 12:20:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
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    • The Next Country to Send a Human to the Moon Probably Won't Be the U.S.

      The next country to send a human to the moon will be China, according to a panel of experts that debated the future of space travel this week. Morgan Stanley held its inaugural “Space Summit” in New York City to discuss the big issues surrounding the industry, featuring speakers from 12 companies, and during a discussion 10 of the representatives claimed the country would beat the United States to a return lunar visit.

      The declaration is perhaps no surprise, as China has been gradually stepping up preparations to visit the moon since it announced its intention in 2016. Yang Liwei, deputy director general of China Manned Space Agency, confirmed in June 2017 that teams were making preliminary preparations for a visit. In April 2018, the China National Space Administration unveiled a bold vision of a lunar base comprised of tube-shaped cabins as early as 2030. At Morgan Stanley’s event, the experts predicted that the next human would visit the moon somewhere between 2022 and 2030, averaging out to an answer of 2025.

      Read More... The Next Country to Send a Human to the Moon Probably Won't Be the U.S.

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 12:20:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
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    • Google pledges to hold off on selling facial recognition technology

      Today, Google shared information about some of the AI work it's doing in Asia, but in a blog post about the work, it also made a pretty clear statement about how its facial recognition technology will and won't be used for the time being. The company...

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 12:09:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
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    • To Get His Border Wall, the President May Have to Go Through Elon Musk

      The aspirations of SpaceX CEO Elon Musk and President Donald Trump have inadvertently crossed have reportedly collided: The plot of land where the billionaire entrepreneur is constructing SpaceX’s South Texas launch site to launch the future Starship rocket stands in the way of where Trump wants to build his proposed border wall. You can check out some footage of the Texas facility in the footage above.

      Musk is the landowner of the roughly 57-acre stretch of rural area in the Boca Chica Village found at the southernmost tip of Texas. Construction has been ongoing since September 2014 with the launch site scheduled to be completed sometime in 2019. But The New York Times reported Thursday that Trump’s plans would impede Starship’s future launch site if the President ever gets the project off the ground. The result would most likely result in both projects being stalled indefinitely.

      Read More... To Get His Border Wall, the President May Have to Go Through Elon Musk

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 12:08:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
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    • Virgin Galactic just flew to 82.68 kilometers—is this space?

      Enlarge / The VSS Unity spacecraft returns to Earth on Thursday. (credit: Virgin Galactic)

      On a clear and cold Thursday morning in the Mojave Desert, Virgin Galactic's White Knight Two aircraft took off. It carried the VSS Unity spacecraft, which on its fourth powered flight, sought to make the company's highest and fastest flight ever. It succeeded.

      With Mark "Forger" Stucky and C.J Sturckow piloting the vehicle, VSS Unity was dropped from White Knight Two before burning its rocket motor for 60 seconds, reaching a velocity of Mach 2.9 and soaring to an altitude of 82.68km. These were records for the company, which may begin flying space tourists in 2019.

      How big of a deal is suborbital flight?

      On one hand, it's difficult to get any rocket to fly high and true. Consider that Virgin Galactic was founded in 2004. It had a basic architecture at that time—an air-launched, rocket-powered spaceship based upon a proven design—and ample funding from a British billionaire. It still took 14 years for the company to make its first spaceflight.

      Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 12:06:41 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Apple Watch Saved Man From “Silent" Heart Issue That May Affect Many Others

      Ed Dentel was chasing his seven-year-old daughter around the slides at Pennsylvania’s Great Wolf Lodge water park when his heart started pounding. The 46-year-old taekwondo enthusiast from outside Richmond, Virginia wasn’t feeling quite like himself in the days before Thanksgiving, but he wrote it off at the time. His watch would later tell him that his heart was trying to send him a message.

      Weeks after Dentel returned from the Great Wolf Lodge, Apple released an update to his Apple Watch that would change his life. The update allowed Apple Watch Series 4 users to take an electrocardiogram — a medical grade heart rate reading — and run it through an algorithm that detects atrial fibrillation, a potentially disastrous fluttering of the heart.

      Read More... Apple Watch Saved Man From “Silent" Heart Issue That May Affect Many Others

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 12:03:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
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    • World's Best 'Melee' Player Reveals His Early 'Smash Ultimate' Tier List

      It’s been less than a week since Super Smash Bros. Ultimate arrived on Nintendo Switch, but the first preliminary tier lists have already hit the internet from some of the world’s best Smashers. We previously discussed the Smash Bros. Ultimate tier list from ZeRo — considered to be the best at the previous iteration of Smash for Wii U — but depending on who you ask he’s still not the best player on Earth.

      For some die-hard Smash fans, Melee (the GameCube edition) is the only game that really counts, and from that perspective, William Peter Hjelte (aka, Leffen) is actually the best player around. So when Leffen offers up his own early Smash Bros. Ultimate tier list, it’s worth paying attention.

      Read More... World's Best 'Melee' Player Reveals His Early 'Smash Ultimate' Tier List

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 12:03:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
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    • YouTube Music offers charts for the hottest songs and videos

      If you thought YouTube's music video charts would be a logical fit for YouTube Music, you guessed correctly. The streaming media giant is rolling YouTube Charts into its Music service as playlists that you can find either on the app's home screen or...

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 12:00:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Google Assistant can now speak with an Australian or English accent

      Google Assistant hasn't been traveling, but it has picked up some new accents. The voice assistant now has the ability to speak in an Australian or English accent (though Google calls it British). The feature is available across all devices including...

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 12:00:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
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    • Kartridge is a curated game store, now with more Indie Megabooth

      With the surprise launch of the Epic Games Store last week, followed by scores of news articles and tweets proclaiming war between Steam and Epic, it might be shocking to hear that there are other digital video game marketplaces on the internet. Kart...

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 12:00:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
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    • Here's Exactly Where and How to Play Sheet Music on Pianos in 'Fortnite'

      One of Fortnite: Battle Royale’s most annoying Season 6 challenges is back for Season 7, but thankfully it’s given a festive twist and made just a little bit easier. Here’s what you need to know to find and play the piano sheet music in Fortnite Season 7 Week 2.

      Fortnite’s latest challenges hit on Thursday morning and the playing of giant pianos is back in festive fashion. Except it’s a Christmas miracle that we don’t actually have to find the sheet music first like in Season 6. These days, players can head straight to the pianos to play beautiful renditions of “Jingle Bells” and “The Twelve Days of Christmas.”

      Read More... Here's Exactly Where and How to Play Sheet Music on Pianos in 'Fortnite'

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 11:46:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
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    • T-Mobile lied to the FCC about its 4G coverage, small carriers say

      Enlarge (credit: Getty Images)

      T-Mobile lied to the Federal Communications Commission about the extent of its 4G LTE coverage, according to a trade group that represents rural wireless providers.

      T-Mobile claimed—under penalty of perjury—to have coverage in areas where it hadn't yet installed 4G equipment, the Rural Wireless Association (RWA) said in an FCC filing Monday. The same group previously reported to the FCC that Verizon lied about its 4G coverage, leading to the FCC starting an investigation and announcing that at least one carrier exaggerated its 4G coverage.

      Inaccurate coverage maps could make it difficult for rural carriers to get money from the Mobility Fund, a government fund intended to build networks in unserved areas. The FCC last year required Verizon and other carriers to file maps and data indicating their current 4G LTE coverage with speeds of at least 5Mbps. Carriers must provide "a certification, under penalty of perjury, by a qualified engineer that the propagation maps and model details reflect the filer's coverage as of the generation date of the map in accordance with all other parameters," the FCC order said.

      Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 11:45:12 De: Arstechnica Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis. Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 16:11
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    • 6 Big Easter Eggs in the Final ’Star Trek: Discovery’ Season 2 Trailer

      Earlier this year, the showrunner of Star Trek: Discovery — Alex Kurtzman — said that every new episode of Discovery would be conceived on a cinematic scale — “We endeavor every week to make it a movie,” he explained — and the final trailer for Season 2 delivers on that promise. Is Discovery trying to act a little cooler and more lighthearted than its first season? That’s a big yes, and it’s not necessarily a bad thing.

      Not only will the next season explain the Season 1 cliffhanger involving the USS Enterprise, but the latest trailer reveals more, even deeper cuts referencing the sprawling Trek canon. And, these wouldn’t be Trekkie easter eggs if we weren’t talking about some space-age costumes.

      Read More... 6 Big Easter Eggs in the Final ’Star Trek: Discovery’ Season 2 Trailer

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 11:45:00 De: Inverse articles Feed Dernière modification:
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    • Ranks of Crypto Users Swelled in 2018 Even as Bitcoin Tumbled

      It turns out that cryptocurrency enthusiasts were committed well beyond the HODL rallying call that urged them to hold on during this year's digital-asset market collapse. From a report: The number of verified users of cryptocurrencies almost doubled in the first three quarters of the year even as the market bellwether Bitcoin tumbled almost 80 percent, according to a study from the Cambridge Centre for Alternative Finance. Users climbed from 18 million to 35 million this year. The figures may provide a silver lining. If user numbers continue to increase even in a deep market downturn, that could signal that an eventual recovery could be coming -- a crucial finding at a time when some critics predict that the value of cryptocurrencies will go down to zero.

      Read more of this story at Slashdot.

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 11:41:00 De: Slashdot News for nerds, stuff that matters Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 20:01
      Article complet à lire: Ici
    • Virgin Galactic test flight reaches space for the first time, lugging NASA cargo in place of tourists

      SpaceShipTwo goes faster and higher than ever before

      Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo took its first trip into space today as the company launched the reusable rocket-powered craft on its fourth test flight above the Mojave desert in southern California.…

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 11:38:40 De: The Register Biting the hand that feeds IT Dernière modification: Vendredi, 14 décembre, 2018 - 19:55
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    • Can a Green New Deal boost the US economy and save the planet?

      Politicians like the newly-elected Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez are now taking climate change seriously, but even an ambitious plan to remake the economy may not be enough

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 11:30:00 De: New Scientist New Scientist - News Dernière modification:
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    • Netflix will stream Taylor Swift’s tour film on December 31st

      Taylor Swift announced today that a film of her Reputation stadium tour is headed to Netflix and a new trailer is giving us a peek at what's in store. The trailer begins with Swift saying "When she fell, she fell apart. When she finally rose, she ros...

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 11:29:00 De: Engadget Dernière modification:
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    • Virgin Galactic claims its first successful flight to edge of space

      Richard Branson's space tourism firm says it has finally made a flight to the edge of space - though the craft did not reach the currently accepted definition of 100 kilometres up

      Jeudi, 13 décembre 2018 11:27:00 De: New Scientist New Scientist - News Dernière modification:
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